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DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 




DIVINITY SCHOOL 
LIBRARY 



NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 



ONE-RUNDRED-THIRTEENTH 
YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
WINSTON-SALEM 



1943 



Annual 

of the 

North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention 

One Hundred Thirteenth Annual Session 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Winston-Salem 
November 16-18, 1943 



Edited by 
Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The next Session will be held 

November 21-23, 1944 

First Baptist Church, Charlotte 



Dm a 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 3^ //^ 

ll T 3" SECTION PAGE 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statements, Institutions 128 

Baptist Book Store, executives of 5 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 6 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of 6 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 7 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 5 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 10 

Biblical Recorder, directors of 7 

Campbell College, trustees of 8 

Charity and Children, directory of 7 

Chowan College, trustees of 8 

Committees : 

Allied Church League (14) 26 

Committee on Committees (5) 21 

Constitutional Changes (14) 26 

Enrollment (3) 21 

General Board, to report on report of (14) 25 

General Secretary, to purchase home for (14) 26 

Historical Commission (14) 26 

Music (14) 26 

Non-Resident Church Members (14) 26 

Order of Business (1944) (14) 25 

Place and Preacher (14) 25 

Publicity (14) 25 

Resolutions (14) 25 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness : (14) 26 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (14) 26 

Constitution 11 

Clarification (34) 39 

Convention : 

Audit — Income and Disbursements (74) 76 

Directory 5 

Associational 221 

Historical Table 223 ■ 

Institutions . . . .- 6, 9 

Officers, executive and administrative 5 

Officers elected: 

General Secretary (4) 21 

President (67) 55 

Vice Presidents (67) 55 

Recording Secretary (4) 21 

Statistical Secretary (4) 21 

Proceedings of (1) 21 

Sermon — Oscar Creech, Ahoskie (16) 27 

General Board: 

By-Laws 16 

Officers and organizations 5 

Report (71) 69 

Greetings (10) 24 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 7 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 8 

Meredith College, trustees of 9 

Messengers 60 

Ministers : 

Winston-Salem and Neighboring Ministers recognized (7) 23 

New Ministers recognized (8) 24 

Ordained, active in pastorate 235 

Ordained, not active in pastorate 248 

Ordained, now serving as chaplains in Armed Services 234 

Ministerial Students in colleges and seminaries 230 

Missionaries, North Carolina, on foreign field 229 

"Our Dead" 58 

Pastors' Conference : 

Officers 1944 9 

Program 1943 59 

Reports : 

American Bible Society (69) 56 

Baptist Book Store _.yjj ^ <r> J . j|. (101) 122 



4 Contents 

SECTION PAGE 

Baptist Colleges 

General Statistics 113 

Baptist Foundation (103) 123 

Baptist Hospital (49) (99) 45, 117 

Audit Summary 120 

Baptist Training Union (86) 98 

Biblical Recorder (19) 27 

Campbell College (52) (89) 45, 108 

Church Extension (78) 86 

Committee on Committees (14) 25 

Cooperative Program (100) 122 

Education Commission (53) 45 

Education, Department of Christian (56) (84) 48, 94 

Enrollment 21 

Foreign Mission (31) 38 

Gardner-Webb College (52) 45 

General Board : 

Advance Report (13) 25 

Committee, to report on report of (62) 49 

Huggins, Maloy A., Report General Secretary (71) 69 

Meetings (75) 79 

Recommendations (104) 126 

General Missionaries (76-1) 83 

Historical Commission (45) (102) 43, 123 

Home Missions (37) 41 

Indian Work (79) 87 

Mars Hill College (52) (92) 45, 109 

Meredith College (52) (93) 45, 110 

Missions, Department of (76) 82 

State (35) (76) 40, 82 

Negro Baptists, work of (80) 88 

North Carolina Baptist Orphanage (48) (98) 44, 116 

Audit Summary 133 

Order of Business 1943 (6) 21 

Oteen Mission (81) 91 

Pastoral Assistance (77) 86 

Place and Preacher ', (44) 43 

Publicity Committee (63) 51 

Radio (64) 52 

Resolutions Committee (66) 54 

Relief and Annuity (97) 115 

Sanatoriums and Samarcand (82) (83) 92, 93 

Seminaries (40) 43 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (22) 31 

Student Work (87) 101 

Sunday Schools (85) 95 

Sunday School Board (27) 37 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (65) 52 

Trustees of Convention (46) 43 

Wake Forest College (52) (94) 45, 110 

Chapel (38) 42 

Wingate Junior College (52) (95) 45, 112 

Woman's Missionary Union (21) 30 

Resolutions Approved: 

In Re, Baptist Hospital, to increase trustees (49) 45 

In Re, General Secretary, to purchase home (39) 42 

Ridgecrest, directory of 9 

Southern Baptist Convention, directory of 10 

Statistical Data : 

Associational 138 

Recapitulation 217 

General Church Activities 218 

Statistical Summary 226 

Southern Baptist Convention 1942 220 

Student Secretaries 5 

Sunday School, executives of 5 

Visitors Recognized (9) 24 

Wake Forest College, trustees of 9 

Woman's Missionary Union: 

Directory 228 

Executives 5 

Statistical Summary 228 



DIRECTORY OF THE CONVENTION 
I. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem President 

Perry Crouch, Asheville 1st Vice President 

Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh 2nd Vice President 

J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount 3rd Vice President 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Charles B. Deane, Rockingham Recording Secretary 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Statistical Secretary 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh Trustee 

P. H. Wilson, Raleigh Trustee 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield Trustee 

II. OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Headquarters: 200-216 Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh, N. C. 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Esther Ivey, Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Bookkeeper Debt Service Fund 

Miss Lottie Tucker, Raleigh Bookkeeper Ministers' Retirement Fund 

DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

W. H. Moore, Raleigh General Missionary 

J. C. Pipes, Route 1, Asheville General Missionary 

E. L. Spivey, 220 W. Kingston Ave., Charlotte General Missionary 

Division of Sunday Schools 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Joy Wood, Raleigh Office Secretary 

John B. Lane, Lexington Field Worker 

Mrs. John B. Lane, Lexington Field Worker 

Division of Baptist Training Union 

W. Wilbur Hutchins, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Margaret Sparks, Raleigh Intermediate Worker 

Miss Mary Lou Wall, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Division of Student Activities 

R. T. Howerton, Jr., Raleigh State Student Secretary 

Miss Adelaide Charles, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence, Greensboro \ Campus Secretary 

Miss Mary Lee Ernest, Greenville Campus Secretary 

Miss Louise Green, Boone Campus Secretary 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Raleigh Manager 

Mrs. John M. Link, Raleigh Associate 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh Associate 

Miss Iva Sue Maddry, Raleigh Associate 

Mrs. Mary Mangum, Raleigh Clerk 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh President 

Miss Mary Currin, Raleigh Executive Secretary 

Miss Ora Alf ord, Raleigh Treasurer 

Miss Kathryn Abee, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

Mrs. Edna Buffaloe. Raleigh Stenographer 

Miss Ruth Keller, Raleigh Field Worker 

A. T. Greene, Jr., Raleigh Royal Ambassador Secretary 

III. THE GENERAL BOARD AND ORGANIZATION 

E. N. Gardner, President, Henderson 
Clyde E. Baucom, Vice President, Wilson 
Charles B. Deane, Secretary, Rockingham 

Term Expiring 1944 — W. A. Ayers, Shelby; J. Winston Pearce, Durham; Mrs. J 
T. Alderman, Henderson; Nane Starnes, Asheville; W. B. Carr, Mooresville; L ' M 
Davis, Beaufort; S. M. Robinson, Canton; G. H. Ferguson, Raleigh; R. C. Foster, Leaks- 



575814 



6 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

ville; B. D. Burin, Oxford; Y. C. Elliott, Lincolnton; J. A. Neilson, Thomasville; J. B. 
Turner, Laurinburg; Roy D. Campbell, Bakersville; W. L. Warfford, Carthage; A. B. 
Cash, Murphy. 

Term Expiring 1945— Claude F. Caddy, Raleigh; S. C. Eggers, Boone; T. W. Fryer, 
New Bern; M. L. Banister, Oxford; Hubert M. Craig, Stanley; J. D. McCready, Mor- 
ganton; W. W. Jones, Kannapolis; James H. Smith, Greensboro; A. J. Whitley, Jr., 
Smithfield; H. M. Hocutt, Biltmore; Donald G. Myers, Mount Olive; E. N. Gardner, 
Henderson; A. B. Wood, Charlotte; Mrs. R. K. Redwine, Mt. Airy; John R. Link, Apex; 
J. R. Morgan, Waynesville. 

Term Expiring 19J6— Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson; J. B. Efird, Charlotte; T. L. Cash- 
well, Gastonia; N. D. Fox, Sparta; A. B. Alderman, Snow Hill; Carey P. Herring, Fair- 
mont; Earle L. Bradley, Wilmington; W. E. Stanley, Durham; Lloyd Griffin, Edenton; 
C. F. Gore, Weldon; S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; B. G. 
Henry, Tryon; Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville; Harry Y. Gamble, Statesville; J. E. Baker, 
Burlington. 

Executive Committee: E. N. Gardner, Chairman; R. C. Foster, Vice Chairman; M. 
L. Banister, Secretary ; J. Winston Pearce, Claude F. Gaddy, Louis S. Gaines, W. E. 
Stanley, Ralph A. Herring, ex. of. 

Committee on Missions: Clyde E. Baucom, Chairman; T. W. Fryer, Secretary; M. 
L. Banister, S. C. Eggers, M. Leslie Davis, Nane Starnes, A. B. Wood, Hubert M. 
Craig, J. B. Efird, Carey P. Herring, Harry Y. Gamble, James B. Turner. 

Committee on Training Activities: L. S. Gaines, Chairman; Y. C. Elliott, Secretary; 
H. M. Hocutt, A. B. Cash, Mrs. R. K. Redwine, W. B. Carr, J. Winston Pearce, C. F. 
Gore, M. D. Fox, B. G. Henry, Lloyd Griffin, J. E. Baker. 

Committee on Education: Claude F. Gaddy, Chairman ; Donald G. Meyers, Secretary ; 
J. D. McCready, J. R. Morgan, John R. Link, Mrs. J. T. Alderman, B. D. Bunn, G. H. 
Ferguson, R. C. Foster, James H. Smith, Santford Martin, A. B. Alderman. 

Committee on Benevolence: W. A. Ayers, Chairman; W. W. Jones, Secretary ; Walter 
L. Warfford, Roy D. Campbell, J. A. Neilson, S. M. Robinson, A. J. Whitley, T. L. 
Cashwell, Earle L. Bradley, W. E. Stanley, S. L. Morgan, Jr., E. N. Gardner. 

IV. THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 
BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 12, 1919 

Organized December IS, 1919 

First meeting of Directors, November 17, 1920 

T. S. Johnston, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1944- J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; J. Ray Morgan, Waynesville; E. M. 
Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1945— T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; Clarence Howell, Raleigh; Mrs. R. M. 
Squires, Wake Forest. 

Term Expiring 1946— Earl C. James, Elkin; Joe S. Correll, Raleigh; George Pennell, 
Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1947 — R. L. Patton. Morganton; Bruce Benton, Rockingham; *Oscar 
Haywood, Mt. Gilead. 

Term Expiring 1948— W. F. Marshall, Walnut Cove; Guy Carswell, Charlotte; W. E. 
Goode, Scotland Neck. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 17, 1920 

Chartered December 27, 1922 

Began Operations, May 28, 1923 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent, Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 

J. S. Lynch, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 194<i — Coy C. Carpenter, Winston-Salem; R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy; 
B. F. Bray, Marion; W. K. Rand, Durham; J. S. Lynch, Winston-Salem; A. D. Kinnett' 
Burlington. 

Term Expiring 1945 — E. F. Tullock, Winston-Salem; W. K. McGee, Thomasville- 
Irving E. Carlyle, Winston-Salem; O. M. Mull. Shelby; B. B. Dougherty Boone- R 1 
Wall, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1946 J. Wilbur Crews, Winston-Salem; E. L. Davis, Winston-Salem- 
Don C. Young, Asheville; Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; J. A. Naylor Winston- 
Salem; T. W. Baker, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1947 — Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem; G. E. Tucker, Winston- 
Salem; W. Grady Southern, Winston-Salem; John R. Knott, Charlotte; E. L. Layfield, 
Raleigh ; B. A. Bowers, Gastonia. 

* Deceased. 



Annual of Session 1943 7 

baptist orphanage of north carolina 
mills home 

General Managership began January 12, 1885 
First orphan, Mary Presson, received November 11, 1885 
Ike G. Greer, General Superintendent, Thomasville 
R. D. Covington, Treasurer, Thomasville 

CHARITY AND CHILDREN 

John Arch McMillan, Editor, Thomasville 

C. M. Howell, Plant Superintendent, Thomasville 

Published every Thursday by the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolinj 

Orphanage Journal of the Baptists of North Carolina 

Founded in 1887 by John H. Mills 

Former Editors 

♦ John H. Mills, July 14, 1887 to July 27, 1888; J. W. Oliver, August 3, 1888 to August 

24, 1888; John H. Mills, August 31, 1888 to August 30, 1895; Vacant, 

September 6, 1895 to October 4, 1895; Archibald Johnson, October 

11, 1895 to January 10, 1935; John Arch McMillan, Associate 

Editor, October 31, 1929 to Tanuary 10, 1935. Acting 

Editor January 17, 1935 to May 9, 1935; 

Editor May 16, 1935 — 
Circulation, 28,756 — Price, $1.00 per year 

KENNEDY HOME BRANCH 

Transfer of property, April 26, 1912 

First group admitted, June 5, 1914 

W. C. Reed, Superintendent, Kinston 

Board of Trustees 

Zeno Wall, President, Shelby 

Term Expiring 1944— Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Robert A. 
Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

Term Expiring 1945— Charles Shields, Scotland' Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; T. H. 
Broyhill, Lenoir; W. M. York, Greensboro; Carroll C. Wall, Lexington. 

Term Expiring 1946- Carl Hood, Asheville; J. H. Canaday, Kinston; John T. Coley, 
Rocky Mount; H. W. Baucom, Sr., Wake Forest. 

Term Expiring 1947— Homer Andrews, Burlington; W. T. Love, Jr., Elizabeth City; 
T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. F. A. Bower, Morganton; Mrs. E. B. Gentry, Charlotte. 

BIBLICAL RECORDER 

L. L. Carpenter, Editor, Raleigh 

Published every Wednesday in Raleigh, ^ as the Journal of the Baptist State Convention 

ot North Carolina 

Founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith in Edenton. Moved to New Bern in 1835, then to 

Raleigh in 1838. Publication suspended in 1841, but resumed in 1843. Originally 

incorporated 1901 and owned by the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company until 

purchased by The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina in 1938. 

On January 4, 1939 the first issue was published by the Convention. 

Former Editors 

Thomas Meredith, 1833-51; T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; J. J. James, 1854-61; J. D. Hufham, 

1861-67; J. H. Mills, 1867-73; A. F. Redd and J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; C T 

Bailey, 1875-95; Josiah W. Bailey, 1895-1907; C. W. Blanchard, 1907; Hight 

C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston Johnson, 1917-31; J. S. Farmer, 1931-38; 

George W. Paschal, Contributing Editor, 1938-39; and Acting Editor, 

1939; John Calvin Slemp, 1939-41; Eugene I. Olive, 

1941-42; L. L. Carpenter, 1942. 

Circulation, 14,434 — Price, $2.00 a year 

Board of Directors 

Eugene I. Olive, Chairman, Wake Forest 

Term Expiring 1944 — L. R. Harrill, Raleigh; R. E. Price, Rutherfordton; Eugene I. 
Olive, Wake Forest; O. R. Mangum, Lenoir. 

Term Expiring 1945— J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; W. Perrv Crouch, Asheville; Lee 
C. Shepherd, Raleigh; Marshall L. Mott, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1946— E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; J. Glenn Blackburn, Lumberton; John 
T. Wayland, Durham; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex. 

Term Expiring 1947— Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; Carl M. 
Townsecd, Ralsigb; Henry B. Anderson, Durham. 



8 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

V. TRUSTEES OF VARIOUS COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened as Buie's Creek Academy, January S, 1887 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College, August 31, 1926 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 

Board of Trustees 

B. F. McLeod, Chairman, Buie's Creek 

Term Expiring 1944 — James I. Miller, Wilson; D. T. Dickie, Henderson; D. H. 
Senter, Chalybeate Springs; W. H. Upchurch, Oxford; W. C. Lucas, Asheboro. 

Term Expiring 1945— S. F. Teague, Raleigh; G. F. Pope, Dunn; Mrs. W. M. Morgan, 
Angier; Mrs. Eugene I. Olive, Wake Forest; H. B. Taylor, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1946— B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; A. Lincoln Fulk, Washington; 
Jere D. Freeman. Wilmington; Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington; J. E. Lanier, Winton. 

Term Expiring 1947— George W. Davis, Farmville; Henry B. Day, Sr., Raleigh; R. B. 
Wilkins, Durham; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville; W. C. Downing, Fayetteville. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 18S1 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868 

Became Chowan College, May 17, 1910 

Changed to a Junior College, September 1937 

Board of Trustees 

Mayon Parker, President, Ahoskie 

Term Expiring 1944— Mrs. R. P. Morehead, Weldon; George W. Underwood, Murfrees- 
boro; P. J. Long, Jackson; W. D. Boone, Winton; B. H. Ward, Sunbury. 

Term Expiring 1945 — W. J. Rountree, Hobbsville; John O. Askew, Harrellsville; W. 
Harry Stephenson, Pendleton; W. T. Love, Jr., Elizabeth Ctiy; J. W. Holmes, Farmville. 

Term Expiring 1946— J. H. Matthews, Windsor; A. L. Lassiter, Potecasi; R. R. Jack- 
son, Harrellsville; J. T. Bolton, Rich Square; S. P. Winborne, Como. 

Term Expiring 1947— *J. P. Holoman, Weldon; tj. J. White, Greenville; Bailey Barnes, 
Ahoskie; J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro; J. Mayon Parker, Ahoskie. 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857 

Chartered Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 14, 1922 

Hoyt Blackwell, President, Mars Hill 

Board of Trustees 

E. F. Watson, President, Spruce Pine 

Term Expiring 1944 — Wm. Marvin Scruggs, Charlotte; W. T. Duckworth, Asheville; 
C. M. Wall, Lexington; E. F. Watson, Spruce Pine; W. H. Wray, Gastonia; Mrs. Rush 
Stroup, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1945 — J. Ben Eller, Greensboro; D. C. Bryson, Sylva; W. Locke 
Robinson, Mars Hill; C. E. Blackstock, Asheville; W. R. Chambers, Marion; Emory 
C. McCall, Lenoir; Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville. 

Term Expiring 1946 — Julian A. Glazener, Brevard; Roy Wall, Mars Hill; A. W. 
Whitehurst, Marshall; Mrs. C. M. Palmer, Albemarle; Robert O. Huffman, Morganton; 
fMrs. Carl Bamford, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1947— J. R. Owen, Asheville; Mrs. W. E. Logan, West Asheville; 
J. B. Grice, West Asheville; W. II. Hipps, Asheville; James B. Keith, Asheville; Horace 
G. Hammett, Waynesville. 



* Deceased. 

f Declined to serve. 



Annual of Session 1943 9 

meredith college 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina, February 27, 1891 

Opened for Students, September 27, 1899 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women, January 20, 1905 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment, January 24, 1911 

Carlyle Campbell, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 

W. H. Weatherspoon, President, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1944 — Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh; Z. M. Caveness, Raleigh; 
C. T. Council, Durham; J. Y. Joyner, La Grange; LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; Mrs. Anna 
Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

Term Expiring- 1945 — E. J. Britt, Lumberton; William Harrison Williams, Charlotte; 
Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington; R. N. Simms, Raleigh; W. A. Thomas, Statesville; 
Henry Edwards, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1946 — Mrs. Mabel Claire Hoggard Maddrey, Ahoskie; Mrs. Margaret 
Shields Everett, Greenville; Mrs. Beth Carroll Taylor, Charlotte; J. R. Hunter, Raleigh; 
J. E. Broyhill, Lenoir; Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton. 

Term Expiring 1947— W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; Mrs. 
Maude Davis Bunn, Raleigh; L. A. Martin, Lexington; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; 
A. J. Smith, Goldsboro; James M. Hayes, Winston-Salem. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834 

Chartered as Wake Forest College, December 28, 1838 

Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College 

Officially opened July 1, 1941 

The first Class of Students began work, September 10, 1941 

Thurman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 

John A. Oates, President, Fayetteville 

Term Expiring 1944 — Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro; A. J. Hutchins, Canton; John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; H. A. Helms, Greensboro; R. P. 
Holding, Smithfield; B. M. Watkins, Durham; T. C. Watkins, Winson-Salem; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1945 — Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; C. R. Hamrick, Shelby; W. J. 
Conrad, Winston-Salem; Claude Gore, Rockingham; E. B. Josey, Wilmington; G. E. 
Lineberry, Raleigh; W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; C. Ray Sharpe, Lexington; C. N. Peeler, 
Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1946— J. E. Allen, Warrenton ; A. Y. Arledge, Raleigh; J. M. Brough- 
ton, Raleigh; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee; T. H. King, Wake Forest; W. H. Early, Windsor; 
E. Y. Webb, Shelby; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; D. R. Perry, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1947— J. B. Wyche. Hallsboro; C. H. Durham, Lumberton; D. E. 
Buckner, Greensboro; G. A. Norwood, Goldsboro; J. Bivens Helms, 'Morganton; S. Wait 
Brewer, Wake Forest; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville; Clarence H. Poe, Raleigh; 
Percy B. Upchurch, Monroe; Germain Bernard, Durham. 

VI. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTORS' CONFERENCE 
Officers for 1943 

J. W. Kincheloe, Jr., President, North Wilkesboro 

E. R. Stewart, Vice President, Windsor 

Zeb A. Caudle, Secretary, Lenoir 

VII. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907 

Southern Baptist Convention Summer Assembly Grounds 

Ridgecrest, North Carolina 

GOVERNING BOARD 

Executive Com-mittee Southern Baptist Convention 

Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 

Perry Morgan, Manager, Ridgecrest 



10 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in Augusta, Ga. 

The 1942 Convention was held in San Antonio, Texas. 

The 1943 Convention was deferred by Executive Committee in view of war restrictions on 

travel. 
The next Convention will be held May 16-18, 1944, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Officers of the Convention: 

President: Pat M. Neff, Waco, Texas. 

First Vice President: J. Dean Crain, Greenville, South Carolina. 
Second Vice President: Robert Emmett Guy, Jackson, Tennessee. 

Secretaries: Hight C. Moore, Nashville, Tenn.; Joseph Henry Burnett, Hendersonville, 
North Carolina. 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., Charles E. Maddry, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina member: Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 
Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga., J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary-Treasurer. 

North Carolina member: R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy. 
Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn. T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary. North 

Carolina member: B. A. Bowers, Gastonia. 
Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, T. J. Watts, Executive Secretary. North 

Carolina member: E. Norfleet Gardner, Henderson. 

Institutions of the Convention: 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Ellis A. Fuller, President, Louisville, Ky. 

North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; 

Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, E. D. Head, President, Seminary Hill, 

Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: A. P. Stephens, Burlington. 
Baptist Bible Institute, Duke K. McCall, President, New Orleans, La. North Carolina 

member of Board of Trustees: Wilson W. Woodcock, Greensboro. 
American Baptist Theological Seminary, E. P. Alredge, Chairman, Nashville, Tenn. 
Southern Baptist Hospital, Louis J. Bristow, Secretary, New Orleans, La. North 

Carolina director: S. H. Templeman, Winston-Salem. 

Commissions of the Convention: 

Education Commission — Chas. D. Johnson, Chairman, Waco, Texas. North Carolina 

member : W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest. 
Social Service Commission — J. B. Weatherspoon, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. North 

Carolina member: I. G. Greer, Thomasville. 

Standing Committees of the Convention : 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, Lawson H. Cooke, General Secretary, Memphis, 
Tenn. North Carolina member: C. R. Browning, Jr., Bryson City. 

Executive Committee, Austin Crouch. Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. North 
Carolina member: William Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Order of Business next Session, R. Keely White, Chairman, Tenn. North Carolina 
member: J. Winston Pearce, Durham. 

Special Committees of the Convention to Report in 1943 : 

(North Carolina Member.) 

Baptist History: George W. Paschal, Wake Forest. 

Baptist Papers: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest. 

Baptist Papers Circulation Campaign: Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh. 

Boards: J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro. 

Calendar of Co-ordinated Denominational Activities: None. 

Call to Prayer for a Just and Righteous Peace: J. Henry Burnett, Hendersonville. 

Centennial Session Program: None. 

Church Music and Worship: None. 

Conference with State Department: None. 

Evangelism: Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

Luther Rice Memorial: Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Negro Ministerial Education: None. 

Post-War Program: J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro. 

Public Relations: None. 

Radio: W. Perry Crouch, Asheville. 

Revision of Constitution and By-Laws: J. Ben Eller, Greensboro. 

Statement of Principles, 1943: 0. T. Binkley, Wake Forest. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. Head- 
quarters, Birmingham, Alabama. Miss Kathleen Mallory, Executive Secretary. 
North Carolina Vice President, Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh. 

BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

Headquarters: 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

First Session, Loudon, July 10-17, 190S 

Last Session, Atlanta, Georgia, August 1939 

James Henry Rushbrooke, President, 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

W. O. Lewis, General Secretary, 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

Next meeting: Year and place of meeting to be determined. 



V 



CONSTITUTION 

I. NAME AND OBJECT 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina. 

The object of the Convention shall be to promote Missions, Education, 
Social Service, the distribution and study of the Bible and sound religious 
literature ; and to cooperate with the Southern Baptist Convention in its 
work. 

II. MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be 
composed of not more than three representatives from each white asso- 
ciation in the State and not more than one representative from each co- 
operating church for every fifty members or fraction thereof and of the officers 
and members of the General Board of the Convention and of the Life Members 
so declared under the previous Constitution : Provided, that no church have 
more than ten representatives and no one shall be a member of the Convention 
who is not a member in good standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co- 
operating with the Convention. 

III. MEETINGS 

Section 1. The Convention shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
third Sunday in November, except in those years when the meeting date will 
fall in Thanksgiving week ; in which case the Convention shall meet annually 
on Tuesday after the second Sunday in November. 

IV. OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers of the Convention shall be a President, a First 
Vice President, a Second Vice President, a Third Vice President, a Record- 
ing Secretary, a General Secretary, a Treasurer (the General Secretary may 
be elected as Treasurer at the discretion of the Convention), three Trustees 
of the Convention, and five Directors of the North Carolina Baptist Founda- 
tion. The President, Vice Presidents, Recording Secretary, General Secretary, 
and Treasurer shall be elected as the Convention may determine, the Trustees 
of the Convention and Directors of the Baptist Foundation in the manner pro- 
vided by their respective charters. The terms of office of President and Vice 
Presidents commence at the conclusion of the session at which they are elected 
and continue until the close of the next Convention. 

Sec. 2. The President shall preside over the deliberations of the Conven- 
tion and discharge such other duties as are imposed upon him by the Con- 
vention or as are incumbent on the presiding officer of a deliberative body. 
*He shall in advance of the meeting of the Convention appoint a committee on 
Enrollment consisting of nine members, and a Committee on Committees con- 
sisting of fifteen members. He may appoint other committees zvhen so directed 
by the body. In case of his absence or incapacity the Vice Presidents shall 
act in his stead. In case of his death the Vice Presidents shall succeed to the 
office in the order of their rank. 



* Clarification by Convention. (See Section 34, page 39.) 



12 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve the proceedings 
of the Convention and have the same printed and distributed. 

Sec. 4. The General Secretary of the Convention shall have administrative 
supervision of the work of Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other 
general training activities of the Convention. He shall work under the direc- 
tion and be subject to the authority of the General Board. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent to him for the objects 
of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once a month in the 
Biblical Recorder or the then recognized denominational organ, give a bond 
to the Trustees of the Convention in such amount as they may determine for 
the faithful performance of his duties and prescribe the terms and condi- 
tions of said bond. The Treasurer shall sign all checks, which shall be 
countersigned by the General Secretary, or in case the office of Secretary 
and the office of Treasurer shall be filled by one man, then checks shall be 
countersigned by the bonded bookkeeper, or any other bonded officer or em- 
ployee at the discretion of the Board, which shall indicate its decision and 
will by filing formal resolutions with the depository bank. 

He shall also forward at least once a month all contributions to their 
destination ; at every meeting of the Convention he shall make a full report 
of his receipts and disbursements, and upon retiring from his office, deliver to 
his successor all moneys, papers, books and other property belonging thereto. 

Sec. 6. The Trustees shall take and hold the title to any and all property 
acquired by and belonging to the Convention. They shall require a sufficient 
bond from the Treasurer. In case he shall refuse or neglect to give satis- 
factory bond within thirty days after his election the Trustees shall have 
power to elect a successor. The said Trustees shall elect a chairman and 
secretary and report annually to the Convention the work done by them. They 
shall receive and make such conveyances of the properties of the Convention 
as directed by the Convention. During the interim between sessions of the 
Convention the said Trustees may receive and convey the property of the 
Convention upon the advice and direction of the General Board. 

*V. DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Enrollment to provide 
registration cards for messengers, and have them in a suitable place several 
hours before the time set for the opening session of the Convention. This 
committee shall make a report to the assembled messengers upon the call of 
the President. 

Sec. 2. The Committees of the Convention shall be grouped into two 
categories: 

(A) Those appointed to serve during the scssio>i of the Convention by 
which they are appointed, and 

(B) Those appointed to report at a subsequent meeting of the Convention; 
and both (A) and (B) shall be named by the Committee on Committees. 
Those in group (A) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee to Report on General Board's Report. 

(2) Committee on Place and Preacher for the next Convention. 

(3) Committee on Resolutions. 



* New article added by Convention. (See section 34, page 39), thereby changing 
Articles V through VII to Articles VI through VII. 



Annual of Session 1943 13 

Those in group (B) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee on Order of Business for the subsequent Convention. 

(2) Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its Institutions 
and Members of the General Board. 

(3) Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. 

(4) The Historical Commission. 

(5) Committee on Publicity. 

Sec. 3. The Committee on Committees shall report to the Convention as 
soon after the organisation of the Convention as may be practicable. 

VI. GENERAL BOARD 

Section 1. The General Board of the Convention shall consist of the 
President and Recording Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, and forty- 
eight members from the State at large. The Convention shall elect one-third 
of the members from the State at large to hold office for one year, one-third 
for two years, and one-third for three years, but as the terms expire the 
successors shall serve .for terms of three years. That retiring members of 
the Board be ineligible for reelection until the following meeting of the 
State Convention. No one in the employment for pay of any Institution or 
Board fostered by this Convention shall be eligible to membership on this 
Board, except as an ex officio member. The General Board shall fill all 
vacancies in its membership between the session of the Convention until the 
session of the next Convention, when the vacancies shall be filled by the 
Convention itself in the manner provided by its laws. 

Sec. 2. The General Board shall have charge and control, except when 
otherwise directed by the Convention, of all work of the Convention, including 
Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other general activities, in the 
interim between the sessions of the Convention. Any action by the General 
Board during the interim between the sessions of the Convention vitally related 
to the work of the Convention shall be binding upon the Convention. Provided: 
the Board shall not act upon any matter previously committed to some other 
agency of the Convention ; and provided that the Board shall not launch any 
new institution or enterprise until the Convention shall have considered and 
approved such action; and that all actions of the Board during the interim of 
the session shall be reported fully to the Convention at its next session. 

Provided, further that the limitation of the powers of the General Board 
herein provided shall not at any time be interpreted as prohibiting any 
expansion in any phase of work already established which the Board may 
consider expedient, and which its income and resources may make possible. 

Sec. 3. The General Board or the Executive Committee shall employ a 
certified public accountant each year to make a complete audit of the books 
and accounts of the treasurer and bookkeeping department and report to the 
General Board, which shall receive said report and bring it in printed form 
to the Convention for the Convention's consideration and action, and after 
action by the Convention shall have it published in the Minutes of the Con- 
vention and in the Biblical Recorder, or the then recognized denominational 
organ. 

Sec. 4. The General Board shall report to each session of the Convention 
upon the work done in each department, viz. : Missions, Education, Benevo- 



14 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

lences and all other general activities. The Board shall have its report printed 
and ready for distribution at the first session of the Convention; all reports 
from Educational Institutions, Hospitals, Orphanages, Baptist Foundation, and 
all other institutions or agencies of the Convention shall report to the Conven- 
tion through the General Board. 

Sec. 5. The General Board of the Convention shall meet in regular session 
in January and June of each year, and in cases of emergency at the call of the 
President and General Secretary of the Board or any five members. 

Sec. 6. At the annual January meeting of the General Board, there shall 
be elected the following officers who shall serve for one year, and until their 
successors are elected and qualified : President, Vice President and Recording 
Secretary. 

At the same time the Board shall elect all Departmental Heads and such 
other assistants as may from time to time be deemed necessary, and shall fix 
compensation of its Secretaries and other employees, and all salaried officers 
of the Convention ; provided that at any other meeting of the General Board, 
or at any meeting of the Executive Committee, such other departmental heads 
or assistants may be elected as may be deemed necessary, and, in case of 
election by the Committee, the Committee shall have power to fix compensations 
up to the next meeting of the General Board. 

Sec. 7. At the January meeting of the General Board the work of the 
Convention shall be divided as follows : Missions, Education, Benevolences and 
Training Activities. The membership of the General Board shall be divided 
into four committees of twelve each and the work as above outlined shall be 
assigned to these committees. Each committee shall organize itself by the 
selection of a chairman and a recording secretary. All appropriations for the 
work of the various departments of the General Board shall be made by the 
General Board; but each committee shall make to the General Board definite 
and specific recommendations as to all appropriations. 

Sec. 8. The General Board shall elect an Executive Committee consisting 
of the Chairman of the Board, ex officio, and six other members of the Board 
at large, the members being chosen because of their recognized fitness and 
ability to render the services to be expected of them, and with some reference 
to their proximity to Raleigh, the headquarters of the Board ; and that the 
President of the Convention shall be ex officio member of the Executive Com- 
mittee. The Executive Committee shall meet at the call of the General Sec- 
retary and shall have general direction and oversight of all the work of the 
General Board in the interim between the sessions of the Board and such other 
matters as shall be assigned to it by the General Board. 

Sec. 9. The General Board shall be successor in law to all legal obliga- 
tions heretofore incurred by the Board of Missions and by the Board of 
Education. 

Sec. 10. At each January meeting the General Board may select such 
other departmental assistants as may be needed. 

VII. TRUSTEES OF CONVENTION'S INSTITUTIONS 

Section 1. The charters of all institutions owned and supported by the 
Convention shall contain the following provisions as nearly as may be and 
conformable to the number of trustees to be elected, that is to say: 



Annual of Session 1943 15 

a. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect the trustees 
of said corporation and their regular term of office shall be four years. At 
the first election by the Convention one-fourth of the board of trustees shall 
be elected to serve for one year, one-fourth for two years, one-fourth for three 
years and the remaining one-fourth for four years. At each subsequent regular 
annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina one-fourth 
of the members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be elected 
by the Convention to succeed the members of said Board retiring. 

b. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be 
residents of the State of North Carolina and members in good and regular 
standing of a Missionary Baptist Church cooperating with the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina. 

c. Removal from the State or ceasing for any reason to be a member in 
good and regular standing of a Missionary Baptist Church cooperating with 
the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be equivalent to a 
resignation from said Board of Trustees. Any vacancy on the Board shall be 
filled by the remaining members until the next regular annual session of the 
Convention and the Convention shall at its next regular annual session fill the 
vacancy for the unexpired term. 

d. The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, become dis- 
qualified, or been removed shall not expire until his successor shall have been 
duly elected and qualified. 

e. The Board of Trustees of said corporation by the affirmative vote of 
three-fourths of its entire membership given in regular annual meeting or in 
a special meeting duly called for the purpose, shall have power to remove from 
office any trustee of such corporation for cause considered sufficient by such 
Board, but only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity to him 
to be heard by the Board. 

f. The Baptist State Convention shall have the right at any time to remove 
from office any trustee for cause considered sufficient by the Convention, but 
only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity for him to be 
heard by the Convention. Notice of such contemplated action and hearing by 
the Convention may be given by the Executive Committee of the Convention. 

g. That no individual shall serve on any Board, or Institution, who is at 
the same time holding membership on any other Board or Institution. 

Sec. 2. The Trustees of all institutions, benevolent, educational or other- 
wise under the control of the Convention shall be elected by the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina and shall hold office for the term to which 
elected, unless sooner terminated. When any vacancy shall occur in any Board 
of any institution a nominating committee elected by the Convention shall 
nominate to the Convention Baptists to fill such vacancy. The Trustees of all 
institutions owned and supported by the Convention shall make annual report 
to the nominating committee of any vacancies. Each Board shall have the right 
to make any suggestion to the nominating committee it may see fit regarding 
such nominations, and all nominations made by the committee shall be passed 
upon by the Convention. The Convention shall have the right to adopt the 
report of the nominating committee and elect the trustees thus nominated, or 
to substitute the name of other trustee or trustees in lieu thereof, or recommit 
said report for further consideration as the case may be. 



16 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VIII. GENERAL ITEMS 

Section 1. Individuals, churches, and associations, or others desiring the 
assistance and cooperation of the Baptists of the State in any work not already 
fostered by the Convention should present the question to the agency under 
which it should be properly placed. If the agency should refuse to take it up, 
it may be presented to the Convention under miscellaneous business or a 
special order. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Boards of the Convention and Institutions 
affiliated with the Convention shall be distributed as widely as practicable, 
both as to territory and individuals. 

Sec. 3. The Convention year shall close December 31 of each year. 

Sec. 4. No institution or agency affiliating with the Convention shall 
encumber its property or change its status with respect to the Convention 
without authority of the Convention or its General Board. 

That except as may be necessary in the reasonable anticipation of current 
revenues and payable out of the same, or for the purpose of funding or 
refinancing any indebtedness of the Convention now outstanding, neither the 
Convention nor its General Board shall have the power to create any debt or 
obligation binding on the Convention ; and no other board, agency or institu- 
tion of, or affiliated with the Convention, shall have the power at any time 
to create any debt or obligation binding on the Convention. 

Sec. 5. If for any reason, it shall be necessary to select a place or to 
change the time or place of the meeting of the Convention after the Conven- 
tion adjourns, the President, Recording Secretary and the General Secretary 
of the Convention shall be a committee with power to make necessary change 
or changes. 

*Sec. 6. Any and all resolutions presented to the Convention shall be 
referred to the Committee on Resolutions, except that by a tivo-thirds vote of 
the messengers then present the rules may be suspended and a resolution placed 
upon its immediate consideration. 

Sec. 7. This constitution may be changed or amended on any day of any 
annual session of the Convention by two-thirds vote of the members present 
when the vote is taken, provided notice of the contemplated amendment or 
change shall have been announced on a previous day of the convention. 

*RULES FOR OPERATION OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

I. THE PRESIDENT AND RECORDING SECRETARY 

The President of the General Board, in addition to the regular duties 
incumbent upon such officers, shall appoint special committees to investigate 
and report upon any matters which concern equally all departments of the 
work of the Convention. The Secretary shall record all proceedings in cor- 
rect form and preserve the same. 

II. QUORUM 

Seventeen members shall be required to constitute a quorum of the Board. 
Five shall be required to constitute a quorum of any department. Four shall 
constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee of the General Board. 



Clarification by Convention. (See Section 34, page 39.) 



Annual of Session 1943 17 

III. THE WORK OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

The work of the General Board shall be apportioned among its four 
divisions, in so far as may be practicable, as indicated below. The General 
Board, the Executive Committee of the General Board and the General Sec- 
retary (48 members exclusive of the President and Secretary of the Con- 
vention, who are ex officio members) : 

1. ^Committee on Missions — (12) — Division of (1) Field Work; (2) 
Evangelism; (3) Negro Work. 

2. ^Committee on Training Activities — (12) — Division of (1) Sunday 
schools — Secretary; (2) B.Y.P.U. — Secretary; (3) Student Activities. 

3. ^Committee on Benevolences — (12) — Division of (1) Orphanage; (2) 
Hospital; (3) Ministers' Relief. 

4. ^Committee on Education — (12) — Division of (1) Educational Institu- 
tion ; (2) Ministerial Education. 

5. Department of Woman's Missionary Union. 

The Executive Committee shall have power in its discretion, to modify, 
enlarge, diminish, or otherwise alter the divisions of the work of the Board 
as it may from time to time deem advisable or necessary, the changes so made 
to be reported to the next regular meeting of the General Board for its 
consideration. 

IV. UNDESIGNATED GIFTS 

The General Board at its annual meeting shall determine the percentage 
of undesignated gifts that each object of the Convention shall receive, includ- 
ing State and South-wide, provided always that any allocation of such funds 
shall not violate any order with respect to the same previously made by the 
Baptist State Convention. 

V. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee shall have power to borrow money and execute 
notes on behalf of the General Board for the purpose of meeting the obligations 
of said Board, and to do and perform any act incidental or necessary in the 
execution and discharge of the work of the General Board : Provided, the 
Executive Committee shall not incur obligations for any object in excess of 
the budget fixed by the General Board. Notes may be executed in the name 
of the General Board and on its behalf by the Chairman of the Executive 
Committee attested by the General Secretary, and when so executed by author- 
ity of the Executive Committee duly given, shall be the binding obligation of 
the General Board. 

The Executive Committee of the General Board shall meet upon the call 
of the General Secretary, or any four members. If practicable, at least one 
meeting shall be held each month. 

VI. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION 

His duties, together with all other Departmental Heads, or Assistants, shall 
be determined from time to time by the General Board. 



Clarification by Convention. (See Section 34, page 39.) 



18 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VII. EXECUTIVE SESSION 

The General Board may by a majority vote of the number present, go into 
executive session at any time for the purpose of considering such matters as 
may claim the consideration of said Board. 

VIII. AMENDMENTS 

These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting by a majority vote 
of the members attending said meeting. 

IX. PUBLICATION 

These by-laws, together with any amendments that may be made thereon, 
from time to time, shall be printed in the Minutes of the Baptist State 
Convention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



PROCEEDINGS 

TUESDAY MORNING, November 16, 1943 

1. With Horace Easom, Shelby, Director of Music for the Sessions, leading, 
assisted by Miss Mary Humphrey, Fayetteville, Convention pianist, a service 
in praise opened the One Hundredth Thirteenth Annual Session of the Baptist 
State Convention of North Carolina, meeting with the First Baptist Church, 
Winston-Salem, November 16-18, 1943. 

2. After the singing of "Trust and Obey," "When I Survey the Wondrous 
Cross," and prayer by J. B. Grice, Asheville ; I. G. Greer, Thomasville, Presi- 
dent, called the Convention to the transaction of business at 10:00 o'clock A.M. 

3. The President announced the appointment of the Committee on Enroll- 
ment, composed of Marshall L. Mott, Chairman, Mrs. J. M. Kesler, Avery 
Church, John R. Link, Charles H. Stevens, Miss Pauline Perry, and Mrs. G. 
G. Lanter. Chairman Mott announced at this time that 453 Messengers were 
registered and his motion carried recognizing these Messengers and all others 
who may register during the Sessions as the duly constituted organization for 
the transaction of all Convention matters. 

4. Upon the perfection of the Convention organization, and following a 
prayer by O. R. Mangum, Lenoir, the following Convention Officers were 
re-elected to serve for their twelfth consecutive year : 

General Secretary and Treasurer M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, N. C. 

Recording Secretary C. B. Deane, Rockingham, N. C. 

Statistical Secretary L. L. Morgan, Raleigh, N. C. 

5. President Greer released through the Recording Secretary the Commit- 
tee on Committees : Talmage C. Johnson, Chairman, J. L. Jenkins, E. H. Potts, 
Mrs. Homer Andrews, C. N. Royal, J. Ben Eller, L. L. Hatfield, W. S. John- 
son, Mrs. L. S. Gaines, P. A. Hicks, Trela Collins, W. K. McGee, J. C. 
Canipe, W. A. Stephenson, E. S. Summers, Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, C. L. Gillespie. 

6. The Committee on Orders of Business, consisting of W. Perry Crouch, 
Chairman, J. Winston Pearce, Olin T. Blinkley, J. Glenn Blackburn, Donald 
G. Myers, A. D. Kinnett, J. B. Willis, S. L. Morgan, Jr., and R. E. Wall, 
presented the Order of Business for the sessions, and upon the motion of 
Chairman Crouch, the Order was approved as follows : 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

General Theme: Christianity and the Nezv World Order 
Tuesday Morning, November 16 
10:00 — Praise and Prayer 
10:10 — Enrollment and Organization 

Report of Committee on Order of Business 

Appointment of Committees 
10 :35 — Presentation of Winston-Salem Pastors, New Pastors and Visitors 



22 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

10:50 — Scripture Reading and Prayer J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro 

11:00 — Presentation of Reports 
11:50 — Music and Miscellaneous 

12 :00 — Convention Sermon Oscar Creech, Ahoskie 

Alternate E. F. Sullivan, Hickory 

Tuesday Afternoon I 

2 :30 — Praise and Prayer 

2 :40 — Biblical Recorder L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh 

3 :05 — Scripture Reading and Prayer Bruce Benton, Rockingham 

3:10 — Woman's Missionary Union 

3 :45 — Music 

3 :50 — Report of Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness 

4:10 — Message — The Christian Message and the New World Order 

J. B. Weatherspoon, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Tuesday Evening 

7 :30 — Praise and Prayer 

7:40 — Sunday School Board B. A. Bowers, Gastonia, Presiding 

Report 

Message Hight C. Moore, Nashville, Tennessee 

8 :05 — Scripture Reading and Prayer C. H. Durham, Salisbury 

8 :15 — Relief and Annuity Board E. N. Gardner, Henderson, Presiding 

8 :40 — Foreign Missions Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, Presiding 

Report 

Greetings from Missionaries 

Message — Christianity Permeating the New World Order 

George W. Sadler, Richmond, Virginia 

Wednesday Morning, November 17 

9 :00 — Praise and Prayer 
9:10 — Report of Committees 
9:20 — State Missions 

10:00 — Scripture Reading and Prayer J. W. Kincheloe, Sr., Rocky Mount 

10 :10 — Home Missions R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy, Presiding 

Report 

Address Alfred E. Carpenter, Atlanta, Georgia 

10 :50— Music 

11:00 — Baptist Foundation 

U :25 — Seminaries E. D. Head, President, Southwestern Baptist 

Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas 
11 :55 — Music 
12:00 — Message — Christian Youth and the New World Order 

J. W. Marshall, Richmond, Virginia 

Wednesday Afternoon 
2 :30 — Praise and Prayer 
2 :45 — Baptist Historical Commission 

Report of Trustees of the Convention 



Annual of Session 1943 23 

3 :00 — Scripture Reading and Prayer C. W. Durden, Charlotte 

3 :05 — Orphanage 

3 :30— Hospital 

4:00 — Adjourn — Visit to the Hospital and Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Wednesday Evening 

7 :30 — Praise and Prayer 

7:40 — Reports from the Colleges 

8 :00 — Report on Wake Forest Chapel 

8:10 — Report of Education Commission 

8 :20 — Scripture Reading and Prayer A. B. Conrad, High Point 

8 :25 — Christian Education in the Churches 

Sunday School L. L. Morgan, Raleigh 

Training Union W. Wilbur Hutchins, Raleigh 

Student Union R. T. Howerton, Jr., Raleigh 

8:55 — Special Music 

9:00 — Message — Christian Education in North Carolina. . .Zeno Wall, Shelby 

Thursday Morning, November 18 
9 :00 — Praise and Prayer 
9:10 — Reading of Journal 
9 :20 — Report of Committees 

Publicity 

Place and Preacher 

To Report on General Board's Report 

To Nominate Trustees 

Radio 

Music 

9 : 50— Election of Officers 

10 :20 — American Bible Society 

10 :35 — Miscellaneous 
10:50 — Special Music 

11 :00 — Message — Spiritual Foundations for the New World Order 

Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh 
Committee : 

W. Perry Crouch, Chairman S. L. Morgan, Jr. 

Olin T. Binkley J. Winston Pearce 

J. Glenn Blackburn R. E. Wall 

A. D. Kinnett J. B. Willis 
Donald G. Myers 

7. Host Pastor Ralph A. Herring was recognized and he welcomed the 
Convention Messengers on behalf of his Church, and the other Baptist Churches 
of Winston-Salem. He was followed by Tom S. Lawrence, Winston-Salem, 
full-time associational missionary in the Pilot Mountain Association, who pre- 
sented the following Baptist Pastors of Winston-Salem and environs : Malvin 
Swicegood of Clemmons ; James E. Swinson of Hanes ; Burley S. Turner of 
Forest Hill ; Avery M. Church of Waughtown ; Marshall L. Mott of Ardmore ; 
R. E. Adams of Mineral Springs ; James M. Hayes of North Winston ; T. C. 
Keaton of Temple ; and L. C. Hall of Mayodan. 



24 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

8. General Secretary Huggins was recognized, who took charge of the 
service welcoming the following new pastors into the Convention and the Bap- 
tist Ministry of North Carolina: 

R. Lane Akins, Hayes ville ; C. B. Atkinson, Erlanger ; Das Kelley 
Barnett, Chapel Hill ; R. Knolan Benfield, Hickory ; D. Palmer Brooks, 
Elizabeth City; Charles P. Burchette, Jr., Gastonia; Edward C. Cham- 
blee, Farmville ; H. E. Cherry, Raleigh ; James H. Christie, Waynesville. 

L. S. Clark, Mount Holly; Edward G. Cole, Winterville; Paul E. 
Crandall, Charlotte, J. W. Cummins, Oxford; J. T. Davis, Concord; 
Alfred F. Gibson, Siler City ; L. C. Hall, Mayodan ; George D. Heaton, 
Charlotte ; C. H. Hornsby, Clinton. 

J. Samuel Johnson, Durham ; Bruce B. Littleton, Lincolnton ; Hugh 
T. McElrath, Statesville ; C. W. Mainwaring, Hendersonville ; James F. 
Marchman, Franklin ; F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh ; C. B. Peacock, Cas- 
talia; O. M. Seigler, Hendersonville; David K. Shelton, Jacksonville; 
B. S. Turner, Winston-Salem; James B. Turner, Laurinburg ; J. B. 
Couch, Valdese. 

9. President Greer noted the presence of C. H. Durham, J. Clyde Turner, 
Zeno Wall, R. N. Simms, and Wm. Harrison Williams, former presidents of 
the Convention, and then welcomed the large group of visitors (see page 65) 
in attendance. He next called attention to the presence of J. B. Grice, Leslie 
H. Campbell, and J. W. Suttle, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Vice Presidents of the Con- 
vention. Because of outstanding work as Royal Ambassadors the following 
pages for the Convention were selected by the State Woman's Missionary 
Union and they were at this time presented by President Greer, namely : Frank 
Tatum, Cooleemee; Pat Murphy, Wallace; Nolan Teague, Lexington; Mor- 
ton Miles, Jr., Henderson, and Leonard Crotts, Clemmons ; who served the 
Convention Officers throughout the Convention. 

10. Special Messages were dispatched through the mails to the following 
by order of the Convention: 

Mrs. W. N. Jones, Raleigh ; Rev. Nane Starnes, Mission Hospital, Ashe- 
ville ; Chaplain Ottis Hagler, Mission Hospital, Asheville ; Rev. Wayne Wil- 
liams, Moore General Hospital, Swannanoa ; Dr. Casper Warren, Little Rock, 
Ark.; Rev. N. C. Brooks, Jr., Waynesboro, Georgia; Rev. Douglas M. Braunch, 
Shepherdsville, Ky. ; Dr. W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest; Rev. Reid R. Harris, 
Cumberland County Sanitorium, Fayetteville ; Mr. Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest ; 
Dr. Forrest C. Feezer, Fort Worth, Texas ; Dr. John W. Inzer, Sylacauga, 
Ala; Dr. B. W. Spilman, Kinston. 

Greetings were also forwarded to the following Baptist State Conventions 
now in Annual Meeting : 

The Mississippi Baptist State Convention, Jackson, Mississippi State Con- 
vention of the Baptist Denomination in South Carolina, Columbia, South 
Carolina; The Alabama State Convention, Montgomery, Alabama; The Baptist 
Convention of New Mexico, Portales, New Mexico; The Baptist General Con- 
vention of the State of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ; The Arkansas 
Baptist State Convention, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

11. Messages were received from: Rev. Nathan C. Brooks, Jr., Waynes- 
boro, Georgia; Dr. B. W. Spilman, Kinston; North Carolina Group at Train- 



Annual of Session 1943 25 

ing School and Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky; Mr. Perry Morgan, Ridge- 
crest; Dr. Forrest C. Feezor, Fort Worth, Texas. 

12. At this and similar periods during the sessions special emphasis was 
placed upon the reading of the scripture and in prayer. J. Clyde Turner, 
Greensboro, led in this opening period. 

13. The special order claiming the attention next was the consideration of 
the Advance Report of the General Board (see section 71, page 69), with J. 
Winston Pearce, Durham, President of the General Board presiding. He 
recognized General Secretary Huggins who called attention to the main fea- 
tures of the Report which revealed outstanding gains in all departments over 
the previous year. The financial gains indicated that if the present trends 
continue upward the total receipts should be 30% over that of last year. And 
last year the gain was 30% over the preceding year, and in 1941 the gain was 
some 20% above 1940. Last year the income of the Convention was $1,100,000.00. 
This year it should reach $1,400,000.00. The report was happily received as 
a matter of information and referred to the Committee to report on the General 
Board's report. 

14. The Committee on Committees through the Chairman, Talmage C. 
Johnson, Kinston, released the following Committees, and upon his motion 
they were approved. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Committee to Report on the Report of the General Board: 

John T. Wayland, Durham, Chairman; Oscar Creech, Ahoskie ; J. Ned 
Taylor, Bessemer City; Irby Jackson, High Point; D. M. Edmisten, New- 
land; Miss Myrtle Zentmeyer, Salisbury; E. L. Bradley, Wilmington; Mrs. 
T. L. Caudill, Raleigh, RFD ; W. P. Biggerstaff, Shelby; J. Louis Price, 
Hickory; H. G. Hammett, Waynesville. 

Committee on Place and Preacher: 

Oscar R. Mangum, Lenoir, Chairman; John H. Bunn, Morehead City; Z. 
W. Rotan, Concord; B. G. Henry, Tryon; Boyd Cannon, Shelby; J. S. 
Hopkins, High Point ; C. H. Norris, Wake Forest ; Mrs. Wm. Harrison 
Williams, Charlotte ; Carey P. Herring, Fairmont ; Mrs. Neal Davis, 
Winston-Salem. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

Louis S. Gaines, Lexington, Chairman; R. E. Wall, Elizabeth City; E. V. 
Hudson, Cramerton; Howard Ford, Wilkesboro ; C. A. Rhyne, Salisbury; 
Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro ; W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh ; J. B. 
Grice, Asheville ; S. N. Lamb, Whiteville. 

Committee on Publicity: 

L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, Chairman; R. E. Price, Rutherfordton, J. A. 
McMillan, Thomasville; C. B. Deane, Rockingham; C. R. Austin, Char- 
lotte; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem. 

Committee on Order of Business 1944: 

B. E. Morris, Durham, Chairman; W. F. West, Roxboro ; C. E. Baucom, 
Wilson ; A. C. Reid, Wake Forest ; A. P. Stephens, Burlington ; Eph 
Whisenhunt, Claytnn ; A. B. Wood, Charlotte; Mrs. Carl M. Townsend, 
Raleigh ; Miss Wynona Chaney, Durham. 



26 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Committee on Music: 

Horace B. Easom, Shelby, Chairman; A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek; L. C. 
Pinnix, Jacksonville ; C. S. Hodge, Greensboro ; Mrs. Alice Berman, Char- 
lotte. 

Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its Institutions and Mem- 
bers of the General Board: 

M. L. Banister, Oxford, Chairman; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; Sankey 
L. Blanton, Wilmington ; L. Grady Burgiss, Greensboro ; E. S. Elliott, 
Cherryville ; Wade E. Brown, Boone ; Mrs. C. R. Hinton, Albemarle ; E. 

F. Hardin, Morganton; Mrs. Earl James, Elkin; Harry Y. Gamble, States- 
ville ; Mrs. R. Bruce Wilkins, Durham ; R. P. Hamby, Swannanoa ; Percy 
B. Upchurch, Monroe ; W. T. Baucom, Spruce Pine ; Tom M. Freeman, 
Rt. 1, Selma. 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness: 

A. D. Kinnett, Burlington, Chairman; J. Glenn Blackburn, Lumberton ; 
Marshall L. Mott, Winston- Salem ; E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; B. A. Bowers, 
Gastonia ; E. Y. Webb, Shelby ; Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh ; Charles B. 
Howard, Buie's Creek; J. Roy Clifford, Wilmington; Mrs. J. S. Farmer, 
Raleigh; John W. Holmes, Farmville; Mrs. Nettie Hoge, Greensboro; 
Mrs. R. L. Councilman, Windsor; Smoot Baker, Spencer; Mrs. W. C. 
Reed, Kinston. 

Historical Commission: 

G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest, Chairman; J. W. Whitley, Albemarle; Mrs. 
E. T. Crittenden, Wake Forest ; Thad F. Deitz, Sylva ; L. R. Pruitt, Char- 
lotte; B. W. Spilman, Kinston; L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh; Miss Flossie 
Martin, Winston-Salem ; Willis G. Briggs, Raleigh. 

Non-resident Church Members: 

A. Paul Bagby, Louisburg, Chairman; E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; Miss 
Thelma Patrick, High Point ; Miss Ua L. Hensley, Lexington. 

Committee of Seven — Purchase Home For General Secretary: 

W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh, Chairman; J. M. Broughton, Raleigh ; Mrs. 

B. A. Hocutt, Clayton; J. Winston Pearce, Durham; Louis S. Gaines, Lex- 
ington; Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn, Raleigh; A. D. Kinnett, Burlington. 

Committee on Constitutional Changes: 

Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte, Chairman; R. N. Simms, Sr., Raleigh ; 
J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; C. B. Deane, Rockingham; E. S. Summers, 
Concord ; LeRoy Martin, Raleigh ; L. R. Varser, Lumberton. 

SUGGESTED LIST OF NOMINEES REPRESENTING NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION FOR MEMBERSHIP ON BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES FOR ALLIED CHURCH LEAGUE 

R. E. Price, Rutherfordton ; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; E. B. Goodin, Lincoln- 
ton; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; T. H. Barker, Leaksville; R. C. Foster; Leaks- 
ville; Grover H. Jones, High Point; L. E. Andrews, Lexington; J. H. Early, 
Winston- Salem; J. G. Pritchard, Windsor; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; T. E. 
Story, North Wilkesboro ; Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro. 



Annual of Session 1943 27 

LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; R. S. Averett, Winston- Salem ; Carey B. Taylor, 
Winston-Salem ; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem ; E. Yates Webb, Shelby ; 
E. C. Roach, Kannapolis ; F. H. Brooks, Smithfield; C. M. Beach, Leaksville ; 
A. Lincoln Fulk, Washington ; B. A. Bowers, Gastonia ; M. Leslie Davis, 
Beaufort; Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; 
C. H. Durham, Salisbury. 

John A. Oates, Fayetteville, Clarence Poe, Raleigh; I. G. Greer, Thomas- 
ville ; J. A. McMillan, Thomasville ; L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; M. A. Huggins, 
Raleigh; Bruce H. Price, Asheboro ; B. M. Covington, Wadesboro ; A. Paul 
Bagby, Louisburg ; C. B. Deane, Rockingham, E. N. Johnson, Fair Bluff, M. 
L. Banister, Oxford. 

Walt N. Johnson, Salisbury ; E. F. Sullivan, Hickory ; James M. Hayes, 
Winston-Salem; J. Y. Joyner, La Grange; Don C. Young, Asheville ; W. H. 
Weatherspoon, Raleigh ; J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro ; M. M. Jernigan, Dunn ; 
H. B. Anderson, Durham; Theo B. Davis, Zebulon ; L. R. Varser, Lumberton ; 
E. N. Gardner, Henderson ; Mrs. T. H. Plemmons, Charlotte ; Mrs. W. E. 
Goode, Scotland Neck; Miss Alma Moose, Charlotte; Mrs. T. L. Cashwell, 
Gastonia. 

15. Marshall L. Mott, Chairman announced for the Committee on Enroll- 
ment that 694 messengers and visitors had registered. 

16. After the singing of "Jesus Paid it All" and "O Master Let Me Walk 
with Thee," the Convention Sermon was preached by Oscar Creech, Ahoskie, 
upon the theme, "Hear Him," based upon scripture passages in the 9th Chap- 
ter of Luke read by E. F. Sullivan, Hickory. 

17. The session adjourned following prayer by J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky 
Mount. 

TUESDAY— Afternoon Session 

18. A service of praise with the hymns "Sing Them Over Again to Me" 
and "Pass Me Not, O Gentle Saviour" and a prayer by Luther Little, Char- 
lotte, opened the Tuesday afternoon session. 

19. The Directors of Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, submitted the re- 
port that follows, which was read by Perry Crouch, Fayetteville, and following 
a discussion by Editor L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, he moved and the report was 
adopted. 

REPORT OF DIRECTORS OF BIBLICAL RECORDER, 
INCORPORATED 

The Directors of Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, in compliance with 
the requirements of their Certificate of Incorporation and By-laws, sub- 
mit herewith to the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina their 
report for the year ended September 30, 1943. 

The directors met in the editor's office, Biblical Recorder Building, 
Raleigh, on January 19, 1943. At this time organization was perfected 
as follows : Eugene Olive, Wake Forest, chairman ; Perry Crouch, Fay- 
etteville, vice-chairman ; Lee C. Sheppard, Raleigh, secretary ; members 
of the executive committee, Eugene Olive, Perry Crouch, Lee C. Shep- 
pard, L. R. Harrill, and John Wayland. L. L. Carpenter, editor and 
business manager, discussed with the directors some of his plans for 
the paper. Upon his recommendation, it was decided to make a sub- 



28 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

scription rate of $1.20 a year, or ten cents a month, to churches agreeing 
to send the paper to every resident family. 

The executive committee met on May 5, 1943. Among matters 
claiming their attention was the employment of an additional worker in 
the business office, made necessary by the growing circulation, and the 
adoption of a motion requesting the General Board to provide one more 
room for office space. We are glad to report that this request has been 
granted, making working conditions much more satisfactory. 

A second meeting of the directors was held on October 19 for the 
purpose of reviewing reports for the year ended September 30, preparing 
a report to the Convention, and transacting other items of business. 
The directors are pleased to report a gradual and substantial growth 
in the Biblical Recorder's circulation, as indicated in the month by month 
record appearing below : 

September 30, 1942 .... 11,264 April 30. 1943 16,141 

October 31, 1942 11,878 May 31, 1943 17,018 

November 30. 1942 .... 12,437 June 30, 1943 17,460 

December 31, 1942 .... 12,974 July 31, 1943 17,830 

January 31, 1943 13,058 August 31, 1943 18,315 

February 28, 1943 13,849 September 30, 1943 .... 18,447 

March 31, 1943 14,842 October 31, 1943 19,135 

Of the number of subscriptions on October 31, 1943, approximately 
1,208 are at the individual rate of $2.00; 14,801 are at the club rate of 
$1.50; 2.925 are at the budget rate of $1.20. 

The balance of the total circulation represents exchanges, compli- 
mentary subscriptions, copies sent to advertisers, etc. 

A. T. Allen & Company, certified public accountants, have made a 
complete audit of the books and records of the Biblical Recorder, In- 
corporated, covering the period of this report, and have found them to 
be in excellent condition. From the full report of the auditors, we pre- 
sent herewith a statement of cash receipts and disbursements : 

STATE OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

12 Months Ended September 30. 1943 
Receipts : 

Advertising $ 3,126.34 

Circulation 26,391.12 

Sale of Cuts 177.98 

Withholding Tax Deducted From 

Employees' Pay 258.30 

Miscellaneous 63.25 

Baptist State Convention 7,200.00 

Total Receipts $37,216.99 

Bank Balance September 30, 1942 130.46 



Total Receipts and Bank Balance $37,347.45 



Annual of Session 1943 29 

Disbursements : 

To Increase Petty Cash $ 25.00 

To Increase Postage Deposit 25.00 

Advertising 348.60 

Insurance 56.44 

Miscellaneous 851.07 

News Correspondents 66.00 

Office Expense 300.47 

Postage 2,051.99 

Printing Contract 14,566.22 

Print Paper Purchased 6,739.15 

Rent ' 540.00 

Retirement Annuity 294.40 

Salaries 10,343.77 

Stationery 178,31 

Telephone 109.87 

Travel 491.25 

Furniture and Fixtures Purchased 77.25 

Drayage and Packing Paper 144.11 

Total Disbursements $37,208.90 



Bank Balance September 30, 1943 $ 138.55 

In our report to the Convention one year ago, we expressed the belief 
that we would not need to call upon the Convention for an appropriation 
in excess of $10,000 to help finance the paper. The records indicate that 
we have received from the Convention during the past year $7,200.00, 
which amounts to an investment of about one cent per copy. We are 
hopeful that a continued growth in circulation will make it unnecessary 
for us to call upon the Convention for an amount this large next year, 
but we are aware of the fact that cost of paper and publication is likely 
to increase. 

We desire to remind the Convention that this appropriation for the 
support of the Convention's journal does not indicate that the Biblical 
Recorder is a financial liability. Some of its pages are filled each week 
with material supplied by agencies of the Convention, and most of what 
is found on other pages seeks to promote the Convention's program and 
achieve its objectives. We believe, therefore, that the Convention's in- 
vestment in the Biblical Recorder is a profitable one for the Convention ; 
that the Biblical Recorder ought always to be a servant of the Conven- 
tion in advancing the kingdom of God, rather than a paper whose pri- 
mary concern is to be financially successful ; and that such advertising 
as the paper carries should not be in conflict with the Convention's ob- 
jectives and the best interests of the kingdom of God. 

The directors wish to express their appreciation of the fact that 
Editor Carpenter has traveled widely throughout the State creating good 
will for the Biblical Recorder and helping to extend its circulation. They 
desire also to record their indebtedness to Secretary M. A. Higgins and 
the staff of Convention workers for their valuable assistance in this 



30 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

regard. They are grateful to numerous pastors and other workers for 
their cooperation in extending the usefulness of the paper to the people 
by helping to increase its circulation, by their contributions to its col- 
umns, and by their generous words about its value. 

We call upon the churches to consider the wisdom of adopting the 
every- family plan as the most practical way of reaching their total mem- 
bership with the Recorder. By this method the church pays ten cents a 
month, or $1.20 a year, from its treasury to send the paper to each 
resident family in its membership. If this is done by a considerably 
larger number of the churches, it would be an easy matter to double the 
present circulation. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Eugene Olive, Chairman 
Lee C. Sheppard, Secretary 

20. The special scripture reading and prayer for this session was led by 
Bruce Benton, Rockingham. 

21. Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh, President of the Woman's Missionary 
Union, read the report appearing below, and after her motion she introduced 
several members of the Department of Woman's Missionary Union, and there- 
after presented J. S. Bishop, Birmingham, Ala., who brought a special message 
in support of the Woman's work, after which the report was adopted. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The 1943 watchword of Woman's Missionary Union sets forth the 
high aim of our Missionary endeavor : "That all the kingdoms of the 
Earth may know that Thou art the Lord, even Thou only" (Isa. 37:20b). 
It is a privilege to bring to you a report of at least some of the efforts 
that your Auxiliary, The Woman's Missionary Union of North Caro- 
lina, has made since we last met to help bring the watchword to reality. 

In March, 1943, at our annual meeting in the Tabernacle Church in 
Raleigh gratifying reports of the work of 1942 were heard from all 
our officers and departmental chairmen. We listened with joy to Miss 
Alford, our Treasurer, as she gave a grand total of $387,728.60. This 
is an all-time record, exceeding the gifts of even the Ruby Anniversary 
by $42,528.61. And with thankful hearts we learn that for the first 
three quarters of 1943 the gifts amount to $304,465.49. 

The Heck Memorial gifts in 1942 amounted to $8,311.65, appropriated 
to work in Free China, to the Department of Religious Education at 
Shaw, to Royal Ambassador work in North Carolina, to the Indian 
Orphanage, and to the Y. W. A's of our colleges, to help stimulate 
Missionary interest. This is indeed our "magical offering" as Miss 
Mallory described it. Gifts to the 100,000 Club totalled $50,027.13, from 
January through September of 1943 ; $45,779.43 has been brought to 
help clear our debts. We pledge to keep loyal interest until every dol- 
lar of our Southwide and State debts are paid. The policy of the 
Woman's Missionary Union is never to make debts. 

We have especially emphasized State Missions, with the result that 
in two years our special offering to this cause has doubled. 



Annual of Session 1943 31 

This wonderful increase in giving has not come about by wishful 
thinking, but is the result, we feel, of constant striving toward attaining 
of five chief aims — prayer, study, community missions, stewardship, and 
the missionary education of the young people. To each officer, and to 
each chairman, we wish to express deep gratitude for her joyous, un- 
tiring service. 

There have been changes in our personnel. With deep regret was 
accepted the resignation of Mrs. T. M. Pittman, Margaret Fund Chair- 
man ; Miss Myrtle Zentmeyer, Field Worker ; Mrs. W. D. Briggs, for 
six years our faithful, beloved, Executive Secretary. Cherrie Pearce 
joined the Waves and Mrs. Edna Buffaloe is office secretary. Mrs. 
L. R. Harrill is now Margaret Fund Chairman, Miss Kathryn Abee 
took up the duties of Field Worker in February 1943, only to be chosen 
as Young People's Secretary in July, when Miss Mary Currin was 
elected Executive Secretary. All these are proving worthy of the high 
trust committed to them. 

In June 1943, more than 1400 young people of our State gathered in 
the Meredith and Ridgecrest G. A. House Parties and R. A. Camps 
for three days of intensive study and training. Many made their first 
profession of faith in these meetings ; many dedicated their lives to 
missionary work. 

The coming of Mr. David Byrd, of Mississippi, to our State for 
R. A. field work for the three summer months brought about a marked 
advance in our Royal Ambassador work. Will you not help us women 
in our efforts to enlist and train the boys and young men in the King's 
Business ? 

Three interracial institutes were held, one in Elizabeth City, one at 
Shaw University, one in Shelby. These meetings were all well attended 
by both white and colored leaders, and we feel that much good was 
accomplished. The President of the State W. M. U. had the privilege 
of speaking at the colored W. M. U. in Wilson in August, and at that 
time presented the second $1,000.00 our Union has given to the Depart- 
ment of Religious Education at Shaw University. 

Distinguished visitors who have brought vision and courage to us 
since last November are: Miss Ethel Harmon, Miss Mary Christian, 
Mrs. F. W. Armstrong, Dr. Everett Gill, Jr., Miss Gladys Keith, Miss 
Eunice Jackson, Mrs. J. Hundley Wiley, Mrs. H. H. McMillan, Miss 
Alda Grayson, Miss Clifford Barratt, Miss Bonnie Jean Ray, Dr. and 
Mrs. D. F. Stamps, Mrs. J. A. Tumblin, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Olive. 

We bespeak your prayerful and sympathetic cooperation as we labor 
together to make Christ pre-eminent even to the uttermost part of this 
sin-darkened world. 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer. 

Song: "Amazing Grace." 

22. Chairman E. N. Gardner, Henderson, read the following report for 
the Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. 



32 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL SERVICE AND CIVIC 
RIGHTEOUSNESS 

Proving ourselves Giristian is always the supreme test of our faith. 
Every generation is compelled to declare its belief with regard to the 
issues of its day ; and, consequently, for every generation there is the 
imperative to find the teaching of Christ in its relationship to the various 
problems of the individual and society. Surely the issues of this time 
are fraught with such importance for humanity that no studious Chris- 
tian dare fail to seek the interpretation it would expect the Great 
Teacher to place upon requirements for discipleship. It is in the 
spirit of earnest seekers after truth that your committee on social service 
and civic righteousness has approached the problems it presents to the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina in its 1943 session at 
Winston-Salem. 

I. Global War 

We live in the midst of interlocking issues, almost all of which today 
are bound up with questions that arise out of the present global strife. 
That we are at war is to be deplored, whatever may be the argument to 
justify the righteous nature of the struggle, for war is opposed to the 
philosophy of love that is central in the teachings of Jesus. 

Our country is, nevertheless, at war. The historic attitude of Bap- 
tists in every national crisis of this sort has been one of patriotism. 
They have fought for freedom, have planned for national development 
in time of peace, and have always proved loyal citizens. In this war 
they are exemplifying those virtues of courage and sacrifice on the 
battlefield, in military posts and in civilian life that demonstrate the 
finest qualities of Christian citizenship. 

However, let not the church ask for the blessing of God upon war. 
As a denomination we single out no group against whom we are to 
take up arms. No local church decries any nation, or exhorts its mem- 
bers to pray for the extermination of any people. As Christians, we 
insist that even in war time hatred of others must be avoided, even 
when we are moved with righteous indignation against their evil deeds. 
God loves all mankind ; and as children of the Heavenly Father it be- 
hooves us to pray for them which despitefully use us. 

II. Present Humanitarian Calls 

There are certain calls for humanitarian service to which we make 
definite response. Our people in North Carolina continue cheerfully 
their gifts for the relief of the stricken people of the world. The money 
sent for world emergency within recent months will save the lives of 
millions of hungry, emaciated and diseased men, women and children. 
We must continue this ministry not only as long as the war lasts, but 
in generous fashion when the actual fighting comes to a close — a min- 
istry not only for allies, but for the Axis people as well, remembering 
the words of the Lord Jesus, "If thine enemy hunger, feed him." 

A great missionary opportunity is afforded Christian people at pres- 
ent in bringing to this country thousands of Axis prisoners. By supply- 
ing them with literature and Bibles in their own tongue, by personal 



Annual of Session 1943 33 

contacts through chaplains in the area in which they are located, by 
simply, Christlike courtesies we may prove ambassadors of the Master 
to those brought here, and may thus make possible their return as 
messengers of good will through the grace of our Lord. 

For a second year we have heard of the need of religious work being 
done in military camps of North Carolina, where probably more enlisted 
men are quartered than in any other state. Again our churches have 
responded, knowing that through the ministry of men and women in or 
near camp communities it is possible to keep burning the flames of 
Christian truth among our men far from homes in which they were 
reared. 

In somewhat similar manner our churches are finding it a worthy 
service to care for the spiritual needs of those on week-end furloughs 
in communities throughout the State. Upon the churches of some local- 
ities in the vicinity of camps this task is overwhelming, and is being 
met with heroic spirit. Upon the church in almost every community of 
the State there is a personal responsibility to greet the stranger in uni- 
form, welcome him to the church and homes of our people and minister 
to him in the glad spirit of the Master. 

III. Post- War World 

We believe that Christianity is ever vital, ever resurgent in the life 
of the world, that the future, and not the past, is the golden age for 
the Kingdom of God. Accordingly we look toward the ushering in of 
that day which will be the fulfillment of Isaiah's prophecy, "Neither 
shall they learn war any more." 

We rejoice in hundreds of agencies that are persistently planning 
for the acceptance of principles on which an enduring peace may be 
formulated. Statesmen, editors, teachers, church leaders in all lands 
have been discussing as in no other war the making of a righteous 
peace. For all of this we thank God, and take courage. At the same 
time we affirm the unfaltering conviction that it is supremely the busi- 
ness of the church to declare God's way of living for men and nations. 
There can be no lasting peace without Him who is the Prince of Peace. 

We endorse the underlying rights of all people enjoined in the 
"Four Freedoms" of President Roosevelt, the declaration of the Atlantic 
Charter, the first conference at Delaware, Ohio, seeking the basis of a 
just and durable peace, and the recent Princeton international Round 
Table, as helpful documents for finding the Christian way for peace and 
good will. In them we single out for emphatic endorsement : freedom 
of speech, freedom of every person to worship God in his own way, 
freedom from want and freedom from fear — "everywhere in the world" ; 
"the enjoyment by all states, great and small, victor and vanquished, of 
access on equal terms to the trade and to the raw materials of the world 
which are needed for their economic prosperity" ; the right of all peoples 
to choose the form of government under which they will live; the neces- 
sity for reducing the burden of taxes expended by the nations of the 
world on military establishments ; the crushing of hatred and revenge, 
and the employment of forgiveness and good-will in dealing with enemy 
nations. We recognize that our world is one, a unit in which some 



34 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

community of nations must work together, and at the same time make 
possible the expression by every group of those ideals it holds for itself. 
Government for over-run nations and colonial peoples can result only 
from the making of a wholesome treaty. We declare our belief that a 
righteous peace must recognize the right of every nation and of every 
person in it to the full use of God-given talents and opportunities. 

IV. Racial Matters 

Since the war began in Europe four years ago racial tensions have 
been acute, often blazing out in destructive ways. The treatment of Jews 
in many lands has been one of the most heinous crimes of history. Their 
utter extermination planned sj^stematically by Nazi leaders must always 
call for vigorous condemnation by Christians. In this country riots be- 
tween Negroes and whites in several cities are greatly deplored. The 
unwillingness on the part of many white people to accord Negroes full 
opportunity for growth in a genuine democracy, and the bitterness shown 
by some of the colored leaders in seeking to obtain rights denied them, 
are not in accord with Christian ideals for living together. The pres- 
ence in this country of descendants of nations against whom we are 
fighting produces additional friction. In the first world war Germans, 
and those removed by one generation from the Fatherland, often were 
the objects of scorn and indifference. The bitterness expressed toward 
some of them at that time seems in this war to have been directed 
chiefly against the descendants of Japanese in the western part of the 
country, with the placing of a large part of the Japanese population 
in internment camps. 

We urge upon our people charity of feeling, that we may be able to 
avoid intolerance toward those of other races. Let us recognize the 
good in all races and in many of every nation, even as we recognize the 
undesirable in all peoples and in many of every nation. We intreat our 
people to try to learn the viewpoints of others, to temper their judg- 
ments with the attempt to put ourselves in their places, and to encourage 
the natural instinct of every people for freedom and self expression. 
We commend the move to take out of camps the interned Japanese, and 
place them in positions where they may pursue normal ways of living 
in our democracy. We endorse the efforts of some of our churches, and 
especially the W. M. U. of North Carolina, to assist our Negro brethren 
and sisters in following a worthy program of Christian activity, and 
express appreciation for the helpful conferences that have been con- 
ducted toward this end. We pray that our hearts may be free from all 
bigotry, and that instead they may be suffused with the love of Him 
who made of one all nations of the earth. 

V. Juvenile Delinquency 

It does not seem right for your committee to pass by the alarming 
situation that flourishes in connection with the morality of youth. For 
the years of the war civic organizations, recorders' courts, state health 
officials and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have sounded warning 
after warning over the mounting rate of delinquency. A report before 



Annual of Session 1943 35 

the National Probation Association last April revealed that in 148 juve- 
nile courts of all cities and counties above 50,000 there has been an 
increase of 8% of cases tried from 1940 to 1941, and a still further 
increase of 9% from 1941 to 1942, when 112,889 cases were tried. 
J. Edgar Hoover, of the F. B. I., reports that for the year 1942 the 
arrest of girls under 21 rose from 9,675 the preceding year to 15,068. 

There are many causes of this condition over our land. In a time of 
war there is always a restlessness, which affects youth no less than 
adults. The sinister influences of war reach out over the lands affected, 
and cast their shadows over young and old alike. The stabilizing in- 
fluence of the school slips. It was reported by the secretary of the 
National Education Association to its annual meeting in Indianapolis 
last June that 2,000,000 boys and girls between fourteen and eighteen 
years of age had left school to work, that a half million of them were 
fourteen and fifteen, and many thousands under fourteen. Broken homes, 
frequently with both parents away most of the day and night, at work 
or in government service, complicates the problem. The glamor of the 
uniform on any enlisted man too often proves a stumbling block for 
unwary and undirected girls, whose steps are wayward turned. 

As a Convention, we place ourselves on record to endeavor to help 
youth and lead it in ways of stability and right living. We would urge 
our men and women by example, no less than by precept, to direct aright 
the behavior of our youth. To that end we urge the strengthening 
of family ties in the midst of conditions that all but tear them to pieces. 
We would call attention to the importance of boys and girls continuing 
their school work in order to meet the needs of that generation of men 
and women of which they will be a part. We favor the strengthening 
of our juvenile courts and probation offices, so that they may give more 
particular attention to offenders both at the time of the offense and in 
following up the career of the offender. Most of all, we pray for a 
church ministry from pulpit to the last class room, from minister to 
every person under whose care children may come, that it may lead into 
the abundant life of all the children of our land. 

VI. Church League for Abolition of Alcoholic Beverage Sale 

Consistently the church must take its stand for sobriety and temper- 
ance. Intemperance in anything is objectionable; but perhaps in nothing, 
is it seen at its worst more than in the drinking of alcoholic beverages. 
The regular increase in the consumption of liquor has been steady since 
the repeal of the 18th Amendment, and has placed the United States 
among the leaders in drunkenness. 

Among various efforts to outlaw this saboteur we endorse the recently 
organized Allied Church League for the Abolition of Beverage Alcohol, 
and rejoice in its successful enlistment of leading denominations of 
North Carolina for educating against the evils of strong drink, and for 
marshaling the temperance forces of the State to outlaw its sale. We 
heartily commend the participation of the Baptist State Convention with 
its influence and money in the accomplishment of these ends. 



36 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VII. Week-Day Religious Education 

We endorse the movement in many communities throughout the State 
to include in the curriculum of the local schools the teaching of the 
Bible. It is understood that during the 1942-1943 school session at least 
sixty high schools and perhaps twice as many elementary schools oifered 
coures in Bible study, and that this session the number is still larger. 

We favor this as an aid in the solution of the serious juvenile de- 
linquency problem that has greatly increased in recent years, calling for 
alarm signals from church and civic groups, the F. B. I. and other 
government agencies. We believe it is an excellent opportunity to train 
our children in those essential fundamentals of morality and good citizen- 
ship set forth in their highest expression in the Bible. 

It has been objected that this type of teaching in our schools violates 
our traditional view of the separation of church and state. While it is 
true that we must not attempt to teach in a state institution any sec- 
tarian religion, this movement, however, is an effort to inculcate ethical 
principles for every person whether he claims to be Christian or not. 
Furthermore, the course is voluntary. No one is forced to take it, 
although credit is allowed for it. The same arrangement may be per- 
mitted Catholics or Jews in our State school system. Again, the State 
does not pay for the teaching of this course. Money is raised by the 
churches or by private subscription, which keeps inviolate the whole 
principle of the relation of church and state. In view of these facts 
we believe we are justified in expressing hearty approval of this matter. 

VIII. North Carolina Council of Churches 

The great social problems set forth in this report, such as war, racial 
tension, drink, crime, are general, and can be solved successfully only by 
united action. It would seem logical to conclude that the followers of 
Christ in all denominations, basically united by a common faith and 
brotherhood, can more powerfully interpret the fundamental Christian 
principles in the light of present world problems, and more efficiently 
promote civic righteousness through some form of interdenominational 
cooperation, voluntarily adopted. 

It is for that purpose the North Carolina Council of Churches has 
operated for several years. Heretofore individual Baptists have co- 
operated with this bod}' as they desired, but the Convention has refrained 
from throwing a united support behind the Council, which serves as a 
medium through which the increasingly necessary cooperative efforts of 
Christian people may be carried out. Its power could be greatly en- 
hanced, we modestly claim, if our State Convention, representing more 
than a half-million members, added the weight of its opinion and con- 
viction in pronouncing upon matters that challenge the Christian con- 
science from time to time. North Carolina Baptists, too, could be 
helped by sitting in council with leaders of other Christian groups, 
seeing their point of view, and joining with them in the promoting of 
large tasks for which singly no denomination is adequately prepared. 

We, therefore, propose that this session of the State Convention 
consider the matter of affiliation with the Council of Churches to find 



Annual of Session 1943 37 

out if after all through this or some similar cooperative agency we may 
not best minister toward the ushering in of the Kingdom of God. 

Committee : 

E. N. Gardner, Chairman 
Lee C. Sheppard 
L. H. Campbell 
W. W. Finlator 
Garland A. Hendricks 
W. Wilbur Hutchins 
H. W. Baucom, Jr. 
Edwin F. Perry 
R. L. Patton 
T. P. Pruitt 

Prior to a discussion of the report as read, it was agreed upon motion by 
Trela D. Collins, Durham, that J. B. Weatherspoon of the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary, Louisville, should first bring his message on "The 
Christian Message and the New World Order." Thereafter George W. 
Paschal, Wake Forest, moved and the Convention agreed to and adopted 
Article I through VI of the report. Concerning Article VII, "Week-Day 
Religious Education" and Article VII, "North Carolina Council of Churches," 
a lengthy discussion arose, involving the extension of time. Strong and vigor- 
ous remarks were made in support of these articles and equally strong and 
vigorous remarks were made in opposition and by a standing vote, the Con- 
vention upon motion by R. N. Simms, Raleigh, voted to delete these two articles 
from the report. 

23. At the close of this session, Chairman Marshall L. Mott of the Com- 
mittee on Enrollment announced that a total of 799 messengers and visitors 
were registered. 

24. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, offered prayer and the Convention adjourned. 

TUESDAY— Evening Session 

25. The choir of the host church under the direction of H. Grady Miller, 
with Paul Lupo, organist, led in the singing of "Blessed Assurance." 

26. Director Horace Easom and L. C. Pinnex sang a duet, "Nailed to the 
Cross," and afterwards J. C. Canipe, Boone, offered prayer. 

Song : "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross." 

27. A report on the Sunday School Board, which follows, was read by 
B. A. Bowers, Gastonia, North Carolina member on the Sunday School Board, 
preceded a message brought by Hight C. Moore, Ridgecrest, formerly Edi- 
torial Secretary of the Board. 

REPORT OF SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD 

The Sunday School Board has felt the pinch of the war perhaps as 
much as any of our Convention agencies. Much of the personnel of the 
Board has been called into service. Many of the essential materials 
are hard to get, and some are not obtainable at all. The Board has 
gladly cooperated with Washington, and is proud to be able to render 



38 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

a worthwhile service for the preservation of the high standards for 
which we stand. 

Truly the Lord has blessed us ; the past year, in many respects is 
the best we have ever had. More people are using our publications, 
studying our periodicals and reading our magazines and books than 
ever. For the first quarter of 1943 the total circulation of all period- 
icals was five and one half million copies. Many improvements have 
been made in our literature. I mention especially the booklets for our 
armed forces and the New Graded Lessons. 

At the June meeting the Sunday School Board authorized the estab- 
lishment of a Foundation to receive gifts and trust funds to be used 
for special phases of their work. 

We cannot speak too highly of the work done by Dr. H. C. Moore 
and Dr. P. E. Burroughs, now retired. These men have served well. 
Dr. W. R. White succeeds Dr. Moore, and Dr. J. O. Williams succeeds 
Dr. Burroughs. These new men have already proved their worth and 
are carrying on in a fine way. Mr. Harold Ingraham succeeds Dr. 
Williams and Mr. J. N. Barnett succeeds Mr. Ingraham. 

Gasoline and tire rationing has not stopped the flow of Baptists to 
the various conferences at Ridgecrest. The past season was by far the 
greatest we ever had. Special plans are being made to take care of the 
crowds next summer. Dr. Moore, we are glad to say, is making Ridge- 
crest his permanent home. We are delighted to have him back in 
North Carolina. 

Your Sunday School Board is yours for service. 

28. The choir of the host church next sang "O Everyone That Thirsteth." 

29. Special selections of scripture were quoted and prayer was led by C. H. 
Durham, Salisbury. 

30. The North Carolina member of the Relief and Annuity Board, E. N. 
Gardner, Henderson, called attention to the report (see section 97, page 115), 
which was approved upon his motion following the address on the program 
of the Relief and Annuity Board by W. R. Alexander, Dallas. 

31. A discussion of the work of the Foreign Mission Board was led by 
Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, the North Carolina member of the Board. 
The following paragraph taken from the report of the Foreign Mission Board 
was the keynote of the discussion : 

"To the Foreign Mission Board 1943 is indeed 'the year of liberty' — 
tine time of its emancipation from the bondage of debt. The generosity 
of Southern Baptists coupled with the Board's competent leadership, 
wise management, and rigid economy have broken the shackles and, on 
March 12, 1943, the financial obligation which, ten years before had 
reached the distressing height of $1,621,643.56 (including some debts in 
mission lands) was removed. It is with humble gratitude that a tri- 
umphant Board now faces a challenging future." 

The discussion of the great need for more assistance in the work of World 
Missions continued, and telegrams were read from John W. Lowe, Richmond, 
Va., and Louie D. Newton, Atlanta, Chairman Southern Baptist Kit Campaign 



Annual of Session 1943 39 

for Russia urging that the Convention take an offering and increase the 
assistance. An offering followed and the sum of $468.89 was contributed. 

A large group of missionaries, now back home, most of them because of 
the ravages of war in the areas of their work were introduced and extended 
friendly and warm greetings. 

Following, George W. Sadler, Richmond, Va., Secretary for Africa, Europe, 
and the Near East, brought a message on "Christianity Permeating the New 
World Order." 

32. After the announcement by the Committee on Enrollment that 826 
messengers and 117 visitors had been registered, the audience stood and sang 
"All Hail the Power of Jesus Name" and following prayer by Eph Whisen- 
hunt, Clayton, the session adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

33. This session opened with the singing of "I Love Thy Kingdom Lord," 
and "Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still." 

34. At the last Convention a committee composed of Wm. Harrison Wil- 
liams, Charlotte, C. B. Deane, Rockingham, and E. S. Summers, Concord, 
was named to make a study of the Constitution and bring to this Convention 
any suggestions that would improve and clarify certain sections of the Con- 
stitution. Wm. Harrison Williams made the following report for the Com- 
mittee and upon his motion the report was adopted. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION 

1st. In Article IV, section 2. Omit the words "He shall appoint 
all committees unless the Convention shall otherwise direct." In their 
place insert the words "He shall in advance of the meeting of the Con- 
vention appoint a Committee on Enrollment consisting of nine members, 
and a Committee on Committees consisting of fifteen members. He may 
appoint other committees when so directed by the body. 

2nd. Insert Article V. Duties of Committees. 

1. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Enrollment to provide 
registration cards for messengers, and have them in a suitable place 
several hours before the time set for the opening session of the Conven- 
tion. This committee shall make a report to the assembled messengers 
upon the call of the President. 

2. The Committees of the Convention shall be grouped into two 
categories : 

(A) Those appointed to serve during the session of the Con- 
vention by which they are appointed, and 

(B) Those appointed to report at a subsequent meeting of the 
Convention; and both (A) and (B) shall be named by 
the Committee on Committees. 

Those in group (A) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee to Report on General Board's Report. 

(2) Committee on Place and Preacher for the next Convention. 

(3) Committee on Resolutions. 



40 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Those in group (B) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee on Order of Business for the subsequent 
Convention. 

(2) Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, its 
Institutions and Members of the General Board. 

(3) Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. 

(4) The Historical Commission. 

(5) Committee on Publicity. 

3. The Committee on Committees shall report to the Convention as 
soon after the organization of the Convention as may be practicable. 
Change Articles five through seven to six through eight. 

3. Changes in present Article seven. 

Art. VII, section four : Strike out words "Provided that" through 
"with interest." 

After section five insert. 

Section 6. 

Any and all resolutions presented to the Convention shall be referred 
to the Committee on Resolutions, except that by a two-thirds vote of 
the messengers then present the rules may be suspended and a resolution 
placed upon its immediate consideration. Change present section 6 to 
section 7. 

4. Under "By-laws of the General Board." 

Change title from "By-laws of the General Board" to "Rules for 
Operation of the General Board." 

In Article three change words "Department of" to "Committee on" 
and strike out "Secretary of" Missions, Training Activities, Benevolences 
and Education. 

Your Committee has found that there are many items in the Con- 
stitution which should be included in a set of by-laws, that there are 
repetitions in the various articles, and that some expressions should be 
clarified; we therefore recommend that a committee of five be appointed 
who shall, at the next session of the Convention, present a revised Con- 
stitution of the Convention. 

35. General Secretary, Maloy A. Huggins, took charge of the next order, 
a consideration of and general discussion of State Missions. After recognizing 
the Mission Pastors, including Edwin F. Perry, Lewis E. Ludlum, and James 
H. Butler, leaders in the camp and defense areas of the State, Associational 
Missionaries Miss Ruth Keller of the Cadwell, Miss Willa B. Marks of the 
Surry, Miss Laura Mae Hillard of the Yancey and French Broad, Miss Madge 
S. Lewis of the Haywood, Mrs. Fannie Gibson of the Macon and West 
Liberty, and Tom S. Lawrence of the Pilot Mountain, U. S. Army Chaplains 
Alfred L. Pollock, Thomas C. Holland, Raymond Long, William W. Lynes, 
Clifford C. Crow, Lloyd W. Teague, J. A. Hudson, and J. Lynn Elder, and 
General Missionaries M. O. Alexander and J. C. Pipes, he presented E. L. 
Spivey, successor to Douglas M. Branch, the new General Missionary, with 
headquarters in Charlotte, who brought a Special Message on State Missions. 

36. A. B. Conrad, High Point, brought at this time the special scripture 
reading and prayer. 



Annual of Session 1943 41 

37. A discussion of Home Missions followed with R. K. Redwine, Mount 
Airy, the North Carolina Member of the Board, presenting the report which 
follows as a matter of information. After recognizing F. D. Hemphill, Durham 
and T. L. Sasser, Greensboro, City Missionaries in North Carolina, he intro- 
duced Alfred Carpenter, Atlanta, who brought the Home Mission Address. 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

For God and Country 

Emblazoned on the honor roll in many of our towns is this phrase 
"For God and Country." This might well have been the motto of mis- 
sionaries through the years for while serving God they were also serv- 
■ ing their country as evidenced by Wendell L. Willkie's assertion in his 
popular book One World. 

In chapter 10 entitled "Our Reservoir of Good Will" he says, 
"There exists in the world today a gigantic reservoir of good will 
toward us, the American people." 

"Many things have created this enormous reservoir. At the top of 
the list go the hospitals, schools, and colleges which Americans — mis- 
sionaries, teachers, and doctors — have founded in the far corners of the 
earth." Now Mr. Willkie nowhere else mentions religious activities of 
any kind but we see that he was impressed by the influence which hos- 
pitals, schools, and colleges supported by Americans had made upon 
the peoples of the world. Now we know that these enterprises have 
been supported almost without exception by the mission boards of the 
churches in America. 

Mr. Willkie says further that "Good will has been stored up for 
us, like credit in a bank account." This account on which we as a 
nation have been drawing so heavily today, was deposited by the small 
percentage of the population who were missionaries and those who 
have supported them. 

Emphasis on Home Missions 

Great missionary leaders have put great stress on the importance 
of home mission work. 

Dr. Austin Phelps said, "If I were a missionary to China, my first 
and most important prayer would be for missions in America for the 
sake of China." 

John R. Mott, speaking of the impact of home missions upon foreign 
missions said, "The ultimate triumph of pure Christianity in non-Chris- 
tian lands depends absolutely upon Christianizing this impact." That 
is to say, a Christianity which does not conquer at home will not be 
able to conquer abroad. 

In religion as really as in commerce we can not give to the people 
abroad what we do not have at home. 

Cause for Rejoicing 

Occasion for universal rejoicing among Southern Baptists is the 

fact that for the first time since 1920 the Home Mission Board is out 

of debt. The final note of the Board's indebtedness was paid on May 

12, 1943. When the final $55,000 note was paid on that date it terminated 



42 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

a struggle against debt for fifteen years during which time the Home 
Mission Board paid a total of $2,425,531.91 on debts. Since 1933 the 
Hundred Thousand Club as furnished $636,900.21 which was a little 
over one-fourth of the total amount of our debts. The other three- 
fourths was paid by the Board from Co-operative Program and general 
denominational receipts. 

Over 400 Workers 

The Board's report shows a total of 475 workers on all fields. Dur- 
ing the year thirteen new missionaries were added, fortry-three mission 
stations opened and six churches constituted. 

The missionaries preached 37,657 sermons, and led 15,928 to profess 
faith in Christ. 

During the year the Board enlarged its work in all fields and also 
added new departments. Notable among these was the City Mission 
department. About 25 missionaries are now employed in the City Mis- 
sion work. They have enlisted more than 3000 volunteer workers. 

Total offerings for the year 1942 amounted to $767,371.41. This 
total included $333,785.71 from the Co-operative Program, $224,910.38 
from the Annie Armstrong offering, $112,312.34 from the Hundred 
Thousand Club, and $53,068.83 from general designations. The Bottoms 
Trust Fund yielded an income of $33,663.05. For the first ten months 
of 1943 there was an increase in the total receipts of $191,295.45 over 
the same period of last year. 

Dr. Beagle Retires 

After twenty-six years of service with the Home Mission Board, 
sixteen of which he had given as field secretary in charge of mission 
work in the homeland, Dr. J. W. Beagle was granted retirement upon 
his request January 1, 1943. In the final report presented by Dr. Beagle, 
he revealed that there were 271 workers in his department who re- 
ported 4,089 conversions and 2,014 baptisms for the year 1942. Dr. 
Beagle has been a faithful and devoted servant of Southern Baptists. 

38. W. H. Moore, Raleigh, special representative of the General Board, 
introduced the subject and spoke briefly on his work for the Wake Forest 
Chapel and then introduced Claude Gaddy, Raleigh, who continued the dis- 
cussion on the work of completing the Chapel which the Convention committed 
itself to erect at the 1939 Convention, held in Winston-Salem. 

39. The following resolution was presented by W. Perry Crouch, and by 
direction of President Greer it was referred to the Committee on Resolutions : 

RESOLUTION TO PURCHASE HOME FOR THE GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

Since the offices of the Convention have been in Raleigh all these 
years, and will likely continue to be, and believing that it would be 
wise for the Convention to own a home there as a residence for the 
General Secretary of the Convention, we offer the following resolution : 

(1) That the Convention appoint a committee of seven (7) whose 
duty it shall be to purchase a home, if one can be secured at a reason- 



Annual of Session 1943 43 

able price, or to buy a lot upon which a home shall be erected after the 
war, if this appears, after investigation, to be the wise course. 

(2) That this committee shall report its findings, actions and recom- 
mendations to the General Board, or to the next Convention; and that 
the General Board shall have the power to determine the ways and 
means by which the funds are to be secured to finance the undertaking, 
and to do all things necessary to fulfill the intent of this resolution. 

40. C. P. St. Amant representing the Baptist Bible Institute and J. B. 
Weatherspoon, representing the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary were 
recognized, after which T. B. Mason, representing the Southwestern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary spoke in behalf of all of the Seminaries. 

41. A special message "Christian Youth and the New World Order" was 
brought by J. W. Marshall, Richmond, Virginia, Personnel Secretary of the 
Foreign Mission Board. 

42. Robert L. Moore, Mars Hill, offered prayer and the session adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

43. The Wednesday afternoon session opened at the usual hour 2 :30 and 
the audience stood and sang, "More Love To Thee." 

44. O. R. Mangum, Chairman reported for the Committee on Place and 
Preacher. The recommendation of the Committee that the First Baptist Church, 
Charlotte be the place of meeting, and that Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington, 
be asked to preach the Convention Sermon with R. K. Benfield, Hickory as 
alternate, was approved. 

45. The report of the Baptist Historical Commission (see section 102, 
page 123 was read by L. L. Morgan, Raleigh, and upon his motion the 
report was adopted. 

46. A report from the Trustees of the Baptist State Convention was read 
by L. L. Morgan, which follows, and upon his motion was adopted : 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The Board is composed of R. L. McMillan, F. H. Brooks and E. 
L. Layfield, F. H. Brooks being Chairman and R. L. McMillan, Sec- 
retary. Only one meeting has been held during the year, this being on 
July 22, 1943. 

In this meeting the following resolution was adopted : 

"Whereas the Executive Committee of the General Board of the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, in its meeting on June 17, 
1943, passed a motion authorizing the purchase of certain property at 
Carolina Beach at a price of about $7,000 with an initial payment of 
about $1,700, and 

Whereas the General Secretary has made arrangements for the 
purchase of said property, agreeing to pay for the property the sum 
of Seven Thousand Dollars ($7,000.00), plus a sewer assessment of 
One Hundred and Fifty-Two Dollars and Three Cents ($152.03), and 
has agreed to pay one-third of said purchase price in cash, namely, Two 
Thousand, Three Hundred and Eighty-four Dollars and One Cent, 
($2,384.01), and 



44 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Whereas agreement has been made to borrow from the Carolina 
Building and Loan Association of Wilmington, North Carolina, the 
sum of Four Thousand, Eight Hundred Dollars ($4,800.00), which 
loan is to be repaid at the rate of Seventy-two Dollars ($72.00) per 
month, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved by the Trustees of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina that F. H. Brooks, chairman of said 
trustees, be authorized to sign 

(1) Indenture dated July 22, 1943 

(2) Real Estate Bond in the amount of $4,800.00 and that R. L. 
McMillan, secretary of said trustees, be authorized and instructed to 
attest the same, both indenture and bond." 

At this meeting the trustees also approved a contract between the 
Baptist State Convention and the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, 
which contract provided for the supplying of heat for the Biblical 
Recorder Building from the heating plant of the nearby Professional 
Building. This contract provided for payment by the Convention of 
$900 a year, based upon the present cost of labor and fuel, and with 
provision for slight changes in the contract on the part of both parties 
as conditions may change. The trustees signed the agreement because 
title to the building is vested in the Trustees of the Convention. 

The Convention requires bonds of certain officers and employees of 
the Convention. We find the following bonds are in force : 

M. A. Huggins, Treasurer of the Convention $25,000 

Margie Murchison, Bookkeeper, Debt Service Fund 10,000 

Esther Ivey, Bookkeeper 10,000 

Lottie Tucker, Bookkeeper Ministers' Retirement Fund.... 5,000 
The following bonds are in force for employees of the Baptist Book 
Store : 

Mrs. Madge A. Marshall, Manager $5,000 

Mary Ayscue, Associate 1,000 

Mrs. Margaret Burch Link, Associate 1,000 

Iva Maddry, Associate 1,000 

Mrs. Mary Mangum, Clerk 1,000 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. L. Layfield 

For the Committee 

47. After prayer by Hight C. Moore, the audience sang "Wonderful Words 
of Life." 

48. A consideration of the Report of the Baptist Orphanage of North 
Carolina (see section 98, page 116) followed with Zeno Wall, Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees presiding. A special message in song was first pre- 
sented by a group of boys and girls from the Mills Home. Miss Sarah Elmore, 
Superintendent of Mills Home was then recognized, who in turn presented 
Miss Ruth Patterson, who spoke on "What the Orphanage Has Meant to Me." 
W. C. Reed, Superintendent of the Kennedy Home then spoke on the 
Orphanage report in a very appropriate manner. This was followed by the 
Orphanage male quartet. Upon motion by Zeno Wall the report was adopted. 



Annual of Session 1943 45 

On the suggestion of Mrs. A. J. Smith of Goldsboro the Secretary was re- 
quested to send a message of appreciation in behalf of the Convention to Mr. 
J. C. Hough of Red Oak for his years of service as Superintendent of the 
Kennedy Home. 

49. J. S. Lynch, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Baptist Hos- 
pitals, Inc., had charge of the presentation of the Hospital Report (see section 
99, page 117). He read the following resolution and upon his motion it was 
adopted. "Be it resolved : 

1. That the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hos- 
pitals, Inc., be authorized and instructed to change their charter so as 
to provide for a Board of Trustees of Twenty-four members instead 
of twenty members ; 

2. That the Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its 
Institutions and Members of the General Board be instructed to nom- 
inate to the present Hospital Board four new members, the term of one 
to expire in 1944, one in 1945, one in 1946, and one in 1947." 

During the discussion of the Hospital Report by Miss Willie Mae Toms, 
Bostic, President, Senior Class of School of Nursing in the Hospital, and by 
Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem, a member of the Board of Trustees, who 
emphasized the twenty years of service rendered by the Hospital, a large group 
of nurses from the Hospital occupied the greater part of the center section of 
the auditorium. The report was then adopted upon motion by J. S. Lynch. 

50. The Convention then adjourned early, following prayer by Wm. Har- 
rison Williams, Charlotte, in order that those in attendance might visit the 
Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College, and the Baptist Hos- 
pital, and be received and greeted there by the respective Boards of Trustees. 

WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

51. Convening at 7:30 the audience heard a special chorus composed of the 
nurses from the Baptist Hospital with H. Grady Miller, Minister of Music of 
the Host Church leading, assisted at the organ by Paul Lupo. The opening 
numbers included "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross," and "The Old Rugged 
Cross." The opening prayer was led by Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill. 

52. Reports were received at this hour from the various colleges : J. Win- 
ston Pearce for Campbell ; President Phil L. Elliott for Gardner- Webb ; Trus- 
tee L. D. Munn for Wingate ; Trustee E. F. Watson for Mars Hill ; Trustee 
W. H. Weatherspoon for Meredith. Prior to the report given by Trustee 
John A. Oates for Wake Forest, the Wake Forest Octet, composed of Miss 
Elizabeth Bryan, Miss Leslie Fowler, Miss Letha Smith, Miss Emily Crandall, 
Don Keyser, Calvin Knight, Bill Padgett, and Woodrow Wall, sang "A 
Prayer for Wisdom." 

53. The Education Committee created by the General Board in January 
1942 (see section 81, pages 73, 74, and 75 of the 1942 Annual) and approved 
by the 1942 Convention meeting in High Point, made the following and final 
report through the Chairman W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh, and upon his 
motion the report was unanimously adopted. 



46 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMISSION 

Your Education Commission, appointed at the High Point Conven- 
tion of 1942, respectfully submits the following report: 

Immediately following the Convention, the Commission met in Raleigh 
and effected its organization. An Executive Committee was named to 
survey the Baptist institutions of higher learning in North Carolina and 
to recommend to the Commission whatever action it deemed necessary 
to achieve a program of Christian Education which would merit and 
receive from the Baptists of the State their enthusiastic approval and 
their generous financial support. This Executive Committee reported to 
the full Commission in July that in its opinion only education experts 
were qualified to make a survey of the separate institutions as to details 
of administration, curricula, physical plants, and other matters pertaining 
to the management of these institutions. It called attention to the fact 
that a survey had been made by experts from Peabody College in 1939 
and that this Peabody report, although not complete in the opinion of the 
Commission, probably represents a fairer appraisal of the institutions 
than could now be had under abnormal war-time conditions. The Execu- 
tive Committee, therefore, recommended to the Commission that it limit 
itself to a consideration of general policies looking toward the integra- 
tion of these institutions into a single system and suggested a number of 
steps by which such an integrated system might be had. The report was 
as follows : 

1. That religion has something distinctive and of highest value 
to contribute to the life of everyone. 

2. That we are able to justify establishing and maintaining Chris- 
tian schools as a means of obtaining, in the fullest possible 
degree, religion's distinctive contribution; and except for the 
promulgation of religious truth and creation of a religious at- 
mosphere in which to study all other truth, it would be sound 
business judgment to dispense with the church schools and 
patronize our most excellent state colleges and universities. 

3. That formal instruction in religion as Baptists understand it, 
and as Baptists believe it should be practiced, is not practicable 
in a publicly supported institution. 

4. That the denomination must have well-educated ministers and 
religious workers, and the Christian college is the natural place 
to which prospective ministers and workers should turn for 
their preseminary or other special training. 

5. That history confirms the belief that the Christian college is a 
powerful factor in maintaining the democratic principle in re- 
ligion and in secular matters. National socialism, regimenta- 
tion, the loss of freedoms, and totalitarianism may within a 
generation easily follow the abolition of Christian schools. 

6. That during this critical period of world revolution, out of 
which will come greater challenges to religious principles and 
truths, it is our solemn duty to adopt a reasonable Baptist 
educational program and to' insure its success by enlarging, 



Annual of Session 1943 47 

adequately equipping, and supporting Baptist educational insti- 
tutions. 

The Committee, therefore, suggests that consideration be given 
to 

(a) Limiting, for the present, the financial support of the 
State Convention to Wake Forest College, including the Bow- 
man Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College, Mere- 
dith College, Mars Hill College, and Campbell College. 

(b) Placing all of the above named institutions under a 
single board of trustees with a separate executive committee, 
appointed by the board from among its members, for each of 
the four institutions ; that the single board be composed of not 
more than 60 persons of whom not less than 25 per cent shall 
be women ; that each member of the board shall be a member 
of a Baptist church within the State ; that each member be 
elected for a term not exceeding six years and not be eligible 
for immediate re-election. 

(c) Such coordination between the work of the senior col- 
leges as may be feasible. 

(d) Making a survey in order to determine the number of 
young men and women available annually as college students 
from Baptist homes within the State. 

(e) Estimating the expansion and equipment necessary to 
enable the junior colleges and the senior colleges to offer to 
prospective students the facilities, equipment, and educational 
standards reasonably equal to those offered by other institu- 
tions of higher education. 

(f) Launching by the Convention of a single campaign to 
be conducted over a period of from three to five years for the 
purpose of raising from $3,500,000 to $5,000,000 for expanding 
and adequately equipping the named institutions. 

(g) Omitting the consideration of questions of administra- 
tive matters until the matters before mentioned have been 
settled. In making this suggestion it is the view of the Execu- 
tive Committee that a successful expansion program will make 
easy the solution of many other questions. 

After full and frank discussion of the report of its Executive Com- 
mittee, the Commission found that there existed within it such diver- 
gencies of opinion that it was unable to take action. Whereupon it 
requested the Executive Committee to re-examine its suggestions in the 
light of the discussion which had taken place. 

The Executive Committee held further meetings, on October 15, and 
November 2, and called the full Commission into session on November 
3 to hear its final report. Its recommendations which now become the 
recommendations of this Commission to the State Convention were as 
follows : 

1. That the Baptist State Convention reaffirm its belief in Chris- 
tian Education through church-supported schools and colleges, 
and express its appreciation for the noble work which its own 



48 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

institutions in North Carolina have done through the years, 
and pledge to them its loyal support for the future. 

2. That Wingate Junior College and Gardner-Webb College be 
recognized as local Baptist institutions meriting the support of 
the associations within the territory which they serve, and 
under the same relationship as now exists between these in- 
stitutions and the Convention. 

3. That Mars Hill College and Campbell College be recognized 
as junior colleges of the Baptist State Convention and continue 
to share in the allocation of funds received by the Convention. 

4. That Meredith College and Wake Forest College be recog- 
nized as senior colleges of the Baptist State Convention and 
continue to share in the allocation of Convention funds. 

5. That the Convention endorse and approve the efforts of all of 
these institutions to raise needed funds from their alumni and 
friends for the expansion of their plants and enlargement of 
their endowments. 

6. That there shall be appointed a permanent Council on Chris- 
tian Education to consist of the President of the Baptist 
State Convention ; the President of the Woman's Missionary 
Union; the President of the General Board; the Chairman of 
the Education Committee of the General Board ; the General 
Secretary of the Convention ; the President of the Board of 
Trustees ; the Chairman of the Executive Committee, and the 
President and Dean of each of the educational institutions 
which may at the time be receiving funds from the Convention 
for current operating expenses. 

It shall be their duty to meet at the call of the General 
Secretary at least quarterly to consider ways and means of 
further correlating the work of the various institutions and 
make recommendations upon the same to the Board of Trus- 
tees of the institutions involved, to the end that each may be 
of the greatest possible service in the cause of Christian educa- 
tion ; to study and give consideration to the needs of the insti- 
tutions and make recommendations to the General Board of 
the Convention concerning the disposition of funds which may 
be available for current operating support ; to formulate plans 
for increasing the interest and support of Baptist people every- 
where in their educational program ; and shall make an annual 
report to the Convention upon such plans. 

7. That upon the acceptance of this report the present Commis- 
sion be dissolved. 

54. The Hospital Chorus sang "Heaven Resound." 

55. J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount, continued the special period in reading 
the scripture and the offering of prayer. 

56. Christian Education in the Churches was the next order presided over 
by General Secretary Huggins. Since all of the time had been consumed 
L. L. Morgan, representing the Division of Sunday School, W. Wilbur Hutch- 



Annual of Session 1943 49 

ins the Division of Training Union, and R. T. Howerton, Jr., the Student 
Work brought brief messages. 

57. A quartet composed of Joe Hamrick, William E. Shield, Grady Miller, 
and J. T. Morgan, sang "I Need Thee Every Hour." 

58. Even at the late hour the audience remained and received the message 
on "Christian Education in North Carolina" by Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

59. After the announcement by Marshall L. Mott, Enrollment Chairman, 
that 962 messengers had registered and prayer by Charles B. Howard, Buie's 
Creek, the session adjourned. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

60. The closing session opened at 9 :00 with the singing of "Take Time to 
Be Holy," the quoting of several selections of scripture and the singing of "I 
Need Thee Every Hour." 

61. Upon motion by John T. Wayland, Durham, the Presiding and Record- 
ing Secretary of the Convention, and the General Secretary were authorized 
to perfect the journal and the reading of same was dispensed with. 

62. Secretary Oscar Creech of the Committee to Report on the General 
Board's report, brought the following majority report and moved its adoption. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON THE 
GENERAL BOARD'S REPORT 

We wish to recommend the adoption of Recommendations 1 through 
9 (see section 104, page 126) of the Report of the General Board, with 
the following addition to Recommendation 1 : 

It is our hope that as soon as the debts of the Convention have been 
paid, that money given through the Cooperative Program will be divided 
fifty-fifty between State Objects and Southwide Objects. In our opinion 
numerous calls for money and objects howevery worthy are confusing 
and bundensome to our people. The best plan for meeting our mis- 
sionary and benevolent opportunities is a greater support and promotion 
of the Cooperative Program. 

We further recommend the adoption of this additional recommenda- 
tion to be designated number 10. 

Whereas there is a serious shortage of nurses, both for the armed 
forces of the United States and the civilian population, and on that 
account the Federal Works Agency is interested in assisting the North 
Carolina Baptist Hospital in the erection of a nurses' home for the use 
of student nurses receiving training at the Baptist Hospital, and 

Whereas the Federal Works Agency is willing to advance the sum 
of seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000.00) toward the cost of the 
nurses' home as compensation for services to be rendered by the Baptist 
Hospital in the training of student nurses for the duration of the present 
war and not to exceed six months thereafter, and 

Whereas an additional thirty-five thousand dollars ($35,000.00) is 
needed to complete the proposed building ; 

Now Therefore, Be It Resolved that upon the request of the North 
Carolina Baptist Hospital, and upon the recommendation of the General 
Board, the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, hereby gives 



50 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

its consent to the North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc., without im- 
posing any financial obligation on the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina, or its General Board, to encumber, if it becomes necessary, by 
first mortgage or deed of trust, the proposed new nurses' home and 
that portion of the present hospital grounds upon which same is to be 
located to secure a loan not exceeding $35,000.00. It is understo'od and 
agreed that the Federal Works Agency retains no interest in the prop- 
erty, and exercises no control whatsoever in the management of the 
home and training of nurses, and therefore, in our opinion there is no 
violation of the principle of church and state, since there is no co- 
ownership and no co-management. 

Following the submission of the above report, H. G. Hammett, a member 
of the Committee to Report on the General Board's Report, brought a sub- 
stitute to the majority report, which read as follows: 

I request permission of the Convention to dissent to the 10th recom- 
mendation in the report of the committee on the report of the General 
Board. While I, as a member of this committee, am in entire agreement 
on the other nine recommendations included in this report, I must, to 
be true to my convictions, protest the proposal to allow the Baptist 
Hospital to borrow $35,000.00 so as to secure a grant, or subsidy of 
$75,000.00 from the Federal Government. 

I make this protest because of two profound convictions. 

1. The acceptance of this proposal will incure more debt upon 
the Baptists after we have been faithfully promised further debts 
will not be made. 

2. The acceptance of this gift, grant, or subsidy, will be, to my 
mind, a direct violation of the principle of the separation of church 
and state. 

I want to assure the hospital of my loyalty and devotion. This protest, 
in no way, is directed against the Committee, the General Board, or the 
Hospital. Neither is it made with any feeling other than that of kind- 
ness and love. My objection is simply made against the above proposal. 

By mutual consent it was agreed, and the Convention approved, the first 
nine recommendations of the General Board, as recommended by the Committee. 

A heated and prolonged debate followed on the question of adopting or 
rejecting the minority report brought by H. G. Hammett. At length Ralph 
A. Herring, Winston-Salem, offered a motion that in lieu of accepting Gov- 
ernment Funds the Convention itself undertake to build the Nurses' Home. 
Secretary Huggins pointed out that an amendment to the Constitution would 
be necessary if the motion involved the borrowing of money, and that, the 
Constitution could not be amended on the last day of the session. 

Upon motion by W. K. McGee, Thomasville, section one of the minority 
report was deleted by a standing and divided vote. Upon further consideration 
section two of the minority report was adopted by a standing and divided vote. 
Whereupon the motion by Ralph A. Herring that the Convention undertake 
in some way to build the nurses' home prevailed, and it was agreed that this 
motion should be put in proper form and brought back to the floor of the Con- 
vention. This motion as unanimously adopted follows : 



Annual of Session 1943 51 

Be It Resolved by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
that the Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist 'Hospitals, Inc., be al- 
lowed to borrow in the name of said corporation a sum not to exceed 
One Hundred and Ten Thousand ($110,000.00), or whatever part of said 
sum may be necessary for the erection of the Nurses' Home; and that 
in order to secure said loan they be authorized and empowered to mort- 
gage any and all said property of North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, 
Inc., for the purpose of securing this loan, and that the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina give assurance to said Board of Trustees 
of its support in the event an effort should be made to raise funds at 
this time : that in the event such an effort is not made at this time the 
Convention assure the Board of Trustees of the Hospital of its continued 
support through the Baptist Cooperative Program. 

Upon further consideration the following motion by Ralph A. Herring, 
with reference to the same matter was unanimously adopted : 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, 
Inc., be authorized to sell to the United States Government a parcel of 
land on which it may construct a nurses' home. The Trustees of North 
Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc., are further authorized to lease said 
nurses' home from the United States Government upon such terms as 
may be acceptable to the Board of Trustees. 

It was understood and agreed to by the Convention that in the event the 
proposition contained in the second motion proved to be unsatisfactory to the 
Government, that the motion instructing the Hospital to raise and/or borrow 
money for the construction of the nurses' home would stand as the action of 
the Convention. 

63. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, presented for the Publicity Committee the 
report that follows and upon his motion it was adopted. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

The Committee on Publicity wishes to express its gratitude to the 
official convention reporters : Miss Martha Ann Allen of Wake Forest 
College and Miss Julia Margrette Bryan of Meredith College for their 
excellent work in reporting the Convention. Miss Bryan edited the 
Daily Information Sheet and Miss Allen did the writing, but they took 
turns staying on the floor of the Convention. About 15,000 words of 
Convention news was sent out from our publicity office. Miss Allen 
also was special reporter for the Charlotte Observer, Winston-Salem 
Journal and Sentinel, United Press, and Old Gold and Black. The 
Winston-Salem Journal and Sentinel was especially cooperative about 
running pictures. 

Associated Press gave unusually good coverage to the whole Conven- 
tion, and this was handled through the local newspaper office, especially 
the Journal. Mr. Gowan Caldwell, the city editor, was especially helpful 
in getting out material for Associated Press. 

We want to thank the local pastors for giving us their time on the 
"Call to Worship" program over WSJS Wednesday evening, November 
17, 1943. 

Mr. C. R. Austin did excellent work on the Convention for the 
Charlotte Neivs. 



52 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

64. A report was received from the Radio Committee, Carl M. Townsend, 
Chairman, and upon motion by Perry Crouch the report was adopted. 

Your Radio Committee has been able to do some helpful things 
during the past year, but, for various reasons, we are far from reaching 
the full possibilities for radio in our Christian program. 

We cooperated with the South-wide radio committee in broadcasting 
the Baptist Hour during January, February, and March of this year. 
We also arranged for the second series of broadcasts of the North 
Carolina Baptist Hour during April, May, and June and the third series 
which is now being broadcast during October, November, and December. 

We wish to thank radio stations WPTF Raleigh and WBIG Greens- 
boro for broadcasting the South-wide Baptist Hour; also WPTF Raleigh 
and WSJS Winston-Salem for broadcasting the North Carolina Baptist 
Hour and also WAYS Charlotte and WISE Asheville for feeding some 
of these programs to the broadcasting stations. 

We are happy to express our sincere appreciation of the splendid 
work of the Radio Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention and 
express our desire to continue to cooperate with this committee as ap- 
pointed by our Southern Baptist Convention. 

We call your attention to the North Carolina Baptist Hour now 
being broadcast and the South-wide Baptist Hour for 1944. and urge 
you to acquaint your church with the hour, the speakers, and the stations 
over which the programs may be heard. 

65. The Committee on the Nomination of the Trustees of the Convention, 
its Institutions and Members of the General Board reported through the 
Chairman, Ralph A. Herring, and upon his motion the following report was 
approved. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE TRUSTEES OF THE 

CONVENTION, ITS INSTITUTIONS AND MEMBERS 

OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

I. Trustees — Baptist State Convention : 

Term Expiring 1944: R. L. McMillan, Raleigh; P. H. Wilson; F. H. 
Brooks, Smithfield. 

II. General Board — Members : 

Term Expiring 1946 : Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson ; J. B. Efird, Charlotte ; 
T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia; N. D. Fox, Sparta; A. B. Alderman, Snow Hill; 
Carey P. Herring, Fairmont; Earle L. Bradley, Wilmington; W. E. Stanley, 
Durham; Lloyd Griffin, Edenton ; C. F. Gore, Weldon ; S. L. Morgan, Jr., 
Dunn; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; B. G. Henry, Tryon; Louis S. 
Gaines, Lexington ; Harry Y. Gamble, Statesville ; J. E. Baker, Burlington. 

Term Expiring 1944 : James B. Turner, Laurinburg replacing O. L. Moore, 
Laurinburg, Resigned. 

III. North Carolina Baptist Foundation — Directors : 

Term Expiring 1946 : W. F. Marshall, Walnut Cove ; Guy Carswell, Char- 
lotte; W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck. 



Annual of Session 1943 53 

IV. North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Inc. — Trustees: 

Term Expiring 1947: Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem; W. Grady 
Southern, Winston- Salem; John R. Knott, Charlotte; E. L. Layfield, Raleigh; 
G. E. Tucker, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1944 : R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy to succeed T. W. Black- 
well, deceased. 

New Members : 

Term Expiring 1944 : A. D. Kinnett, Burlington. 

Term Expiring 1945 : B. B. Dougherty, Boone. 

Term Expiring 1946: T. W. Baker, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1947 : B. A. Bowers, Gastonia. 

V. Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina — Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947: Homer Andrews, Burlington; W. T. Love, Jr., 
Elizabeth City; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. F. A. Bower, Morganton ; Mrs. 
E. B. Gentry, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1946: Carl Hood, Asheville replacing F. B. Hamrick, 
deceased. 

VI. Biblical Recorder, Inc. — Directors : 

Term Expiring 1947: Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; 
Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh ; Henry B. Anderson, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1945 : Marshall L. Mott, Winston-Salem replacing John 
W. Inzer, removed from the state. 

Term Expiring 1946: Garland A. Hendricks, Apex replacing W. K. McGee, 
resigned. 

VII. Campbell College — Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947: George W. Davis, Farmville; Henry B. Day, Raleigh; 
R. B. Wilkins, Durham ; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville ; W. C. Downing, Fayette- 
ville. 

Term Expiring 1944 : W. C. Lucas, Asheboro replacing D. R. Perry, Dur- 
ham, resigned. 

VIII. Chowan College — Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947 : J. P. Holoman, Weldon ; J. J. White, Greenville ; 
Bailey Barnes, Ahoskie ; J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro ; J. Mayon Parker, 
Ahoskie. 

IX. Mars Hill College— Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947: J. B. Grice, Asheville; Horace G. Hammett, Waynes- 
ville; James B. Keith, Asheville; W. H. Hipps, Asheville; Mrs. C. M. 
Palmer, Albemarle; Mrs. W. E. Logan, Asheville; J. R. Owen, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1946 : Mrs. Carl Bamford, Asheville replacing Mrs. John 
W. Inzer, removed from the state. 

X. Meredith College — Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947 : W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh ; Mrs. Maude Davis 
Bunn, Raleigh; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; A. J. Smith, Goldsboro; V. 
M. Dorsett, Siler City ; L. A. Martin, Lexington ; James M. Hayes, Winston- 
Salem. 

Term Expiring 1946 : Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton replacing Forrest C. 
Feezor, removed from state. 



54 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

XI. Wake Forest College — Trustees : 

Term Expiring 1947: S. W. Brewer, Wake Forest; C. H. Durham, Lum- 
berton; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville; D. E. Buckner, Greensboro; J. 
Bivens Helms, Morganton ; G. A. Norwood, Goldsboro ; Clarence H. Poe, 
Raleigh; Percy B. Upchurch, Monroe; J. B. Wyche, Hallsboro. 

66. The report for the Committee on Resolutions was read by Louis A. 
Gaines, Chairman, and upon his motion the report was approved. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee on Resolutions presents the following report : 

I. General Matters: 

We wish to express our sincere gratitude on behalf of the Baptist 
State Convention: 

To our amiable host, Dr. Ralph A. Herring, his co-workers, and 
his fellow Baptist Pastors, who have worked ungrudgingly for the com- 
fort and convenience of the officials of the Convention, its various com- 
mittees and its messengers. 

To the First Baptist Church for the use of its commodious, com- 
fortable and beautiful house of worship, and to the ushers, custodians, 
and all others who helped in caring for the sessions of the Convention. 

To the churches of other denominations in the city co-operating so 
beautifully in the provisions of meals and other comforts. 

To Mr. Horace B. Easom, and all other musicians and singers who 
have created the spirit of worship, which has prevailed throughout the 
sessions of the Convention. 

To all those who — -with beautiful Christian hospitality — have opened 
their homes to the messengers and guests of the Convention. 

To the Winston-Salem Journal and Sentinel and other newspapers 
of the State, which have carried full, accurate and sympathetic accounts 
of the proceedings of the Convention. 

To the Royal Ambassadors who have served untiringly and effi- 
ciently as pages of the Convention. 

To the entire staff of the Baptist Hospital and the faculty of the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College for the 
delightful hospitality provided and given to the messengers of the Con- 
vention. 

To the Mayor and other officials of the city of Winston-Salem for 
many courtesies extended; in this connection we mention especially the 
services of the Police Department for their protection, courtesies and 
leniencies. 

II. American Bible Society: 

Be it resolved that we commend the great work of The American 
Bible Society, which is making it possible for a wide distribution of 
the Holy Scriptures among the men and women in service, and that we 
recommend a continued active co-operation with this Society in all its 
work. 



Annual of Session 1943 55 

III. Re: Suggestion From the Joint Conference Committee on Public Relations 
of the American Baptist Conventions: 

Be it further resolved that — In co-operation with the Joint Con- 
ference Committee on Public Relations, representing the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, the Northern Baptist Convention, the National Bap- 
tist Convention, and the National Baptist Convention, Inc., — We recom- 
mend that the Baptist pastors of the State of North Carolina make 
"Freedom of Religion" the subject of discussion in all their pulpits 
sometime during the convention year, since there is so great need for 
the promotion of Religious Liberty throughout the world. 

IV. Re: Prayer and Sacrifice for Righteous Victory and Just Peace: 

Be it further resolved that, in the midst of these trying days, we 
urge our people to continue in fervent prayer and personal sacrifice for 
a righteous victory and a just and lasting peace. 

V. Re: Plans for the Purchase of a Home for the Executive Secretary of the 
Convention: 

Regarding the special resolution looking toward the purchase of a 
home for the General Secretary of the Convention, — be it further re- 
solved (1) that — we look with favor upon the purpose of this resolution 
and recommend that the Committee on Committees appoint a Com- 
mittee of Seven, whose duty it shall be to investigate the purchase of a 
home, if one can be secured at a reasonable price, or to investigate the 
purchase of a lot upon which a home shall be erected after the war, if 
this appears to be the wiser course; and (2) That this Committee shall 
report its findings, actions and recommendations to the General Board, 
or to the next Convention ; and that the General Board shall have the 
power to determine the ways and means by which the funds are to be 
secured to finance the undertaking, and to do all things necessary to 
fulfill the intent of this resolution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Committee on Resolutions, 

Louis S. Gaines, Chairman; 

Howard Ford, 

J. B. Grice, 

E. V. Hudson, 

S. N. Lamb, 

C. A. Rhyne, 

Ronald E. Wall, 

W. H. Weatherspoon, 

Wilson Woodcock. 

Nov. 18, 1943. 

67. The next order was the election of the Convention President, a 1st 
Vice President, a 2nd Vice President, and a 3rd Vice President. 

For President : The following were nominated : Garland A. Hendricks, 
Knightdale ; Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill ; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem ; 
R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy; C. H. Durham, Salisbury; J. W. Suttle, Shelby. 
At this point Tom M. Freeman, Kenly, moved that the nominations be closed 
and it was so ordered. 



56 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Upon the balloting it was determined that neither of the nominees received 
a majority vote, and in a final ballot upon Ralph A. Herring and Hoyt Black- 
well, who had received the two highest votes, the convention elected Ralph A. 
Herring. 

For 1st Vice President : The following were nominated : Leslie H. Camp- 
bell, Buie's Creek ; Perry Crouch, Fayetteville ; A. D. Kinnett, Burlington, 
and W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh. 

In the balloting it was determined that a second ballot was necessary to 
elect a 1st Vice President, with Perry Crouch and W. H. Weatherspoon re- 
ceiving the first and second highest votes respectively. Wm. Harrison Wil- 
liams moved that the one receiving the highest number of votes be declared 
the nominee and the Convention so voted. 

For 2nd and 3rd Vice President : Without opposing nominations the Con- 
vention quickly elected Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, 2nd Vice President, and J. 
W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount, 3rd Vice President. 

68. With Joe Hamrick, Shelby, who relieved Director of Music Horace 
Easom several times during the session, leading, the audience sang "In The 
Cross." 

69. A report on the work of the American Bible Society was presented 
by Stuart McElroy, Secretary, Richmond, Virginia. The following report was 
received as a matter of information. 

REPORT FROM THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

Southern Baptists are taking a leading part in the essential task of 
providing the Scriptures for mission work throughout the world, through 
their greatly increased gifts to the American Bible Society for its mis- 
sionary non-profit work of translation, publication and world-wide dis- 
tribution of the Scriptures. 

We are grateful for generous gifts from Baptists throughout the 
South, during 1942 and 1943, which have helped us to 

1. Supply Scriptures in many languages for mission work 
around the globe, including Scriptures for the blind in systems 
of raised letters which are read with the fingers. 

2. Provide New Testaments for our Armed Forces, including 
Testaments in waterproof containers for liferafts and lifeboats. 

3. Send Scriptures in more than 30 languages for war prisoners 
and refugees. 

4. Prepare large quantities of Scriptures, in the languages of the 
various countries, to be sent to Europe and Asia for imme- 
diate post-war needs, before publication there can be resumed 
to any extent. 

When the closed doors of Europe and Asia swing open, as soon as 
those lands are set free, Scriptures in many languages must be ready 
for immediate shipment. While our Government sends food and other 
relief supplies, Bible-loving Christians in America dare not fail to 
send the Bread of Life to satisfy the hunger of men's souls. 

Beyond the emergency requirements immediately at the close of the 
war, almost unlimited Scripture needs can, even now, be clearly foreseen : 



Annual of Session 1943 57 

(1) Mission Boards and their missionaries are emphasizing the abso- 
lute necessity for greater distribution of the Bible because experience 
has shown that widespread distribution of the Scriptures in the native 
languages of the people serves as the advance agent and powerful ally 
of all other forms of missionary work. In every missionary advance, the 
Bible goes forward first. 

(2) The heart hunger of the people has produced a great demand 
for the Word of God in lands like Latin America, India, China and 
Africa, as prejudice, opposition and indifference have broken down. 

(3) Although three-fifths of the adult population of the world can- 
not read, millions each year are being taught to read in lands that 
have been blacked-out by illiteracy. This vastly increases the number 
of potential readers of the Scriptures and likewise creates an obliga- 
tion for us to supply them with the Word of God. For example, 
Russia, with fully 90% of her people literate today, in contrast with 
90% illiterate twenty-five years ago, has become a new nation of readers. 
What an opportunity when Russia some day will reopen her doors to 
the Bible! 

Because these needs for increased Scripture distribution must be a 
major factor in all plans for world-wide missionary advance after the 
war, the American Bible Society looks to Southern Baptists, with grati- 
tude and confidence, for an even greater measure of support. 

70. Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh, who was presented for the closing message 
on "Spiritual Foundations for the New World Order," came forward and 
insisted that in view of the pressing matters of the morning session, and since 
the time had fully expired he would not bring a message and , instead, re- 
quested the audience to stand and following his prayer, the One Hundred 
Thirteenth Annual Session adjourned. 

I. G. Greer, President. 
Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary. 
November 18, 1943. 



58 N. C. Baptist State Convention 



&ux Home #oerS 



Note: We call attention to the fact that this list is made up from 
reports received from the associational clerks, to which we add any we 
may know about. We make this explanation because we realize that 
there are perhaps many who have not been included in the list. 

ADAMS, M. A Taylorsville 

BAGWELL, JACK R Fairview 

BROOKS, E. M New London 

BURNS, FORD A Fuquay Springs 

CAIN, A. T Concord 

CULBRETH, H. C Rutherfordton 

DAVIS, J. Autryville 

EDWARDS, A. E Salemburg 

FULGHUM, J. H Mocksville 

HILDRETH, J. H Geneva, Ga. 

HOOPER, M. L Speedwell 

HUGGINS, J. W Fairmont 

HUMPHREY, J. L Lumberton 

JORDAN, WILLIAM Thomasville 

LANIER, HARDY Stedman 

LAWTON, WESLEY W., SR Ridgecrest 

LONG, GEORGE Cove Creek 

LONG, T. C Laurel Springs 

McKAUGHAN, J. A Winston-Salem 

MOORE, JOSEPH PETERSON Ridgecrest 

NELSON, E. R Henderson 

PARSON, JAMES Walsh 

PEARCE, E. P., SR Hamlet 

PRESSLEY, W. W Cary 

SHORE, J. R Vilas 

SIMPSON, T. M Etowah 

SNYDER, S. G Thomasville 

STUKENBROK, K. D Salisbury 

TABOR, JOHN M Needmore 

TRI VETT, G. W Vilas 

WATTS, FINLEY C Purlear 

WOODWARD, DAVID LEON Salisbury 



PROGRAM 



NORTH CAROLINA PASTOR'S CONFERENCE 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
November 15, 1943 

Bruce V. Hartsell, Franklinton, Song Leader 



Monday Afternoon 
2 :30 — Praise and Prayer W. G. Camp, Mooresboro 

2 :4S — Announcements 

2 :55— The Rural Church at Work J. C. Pipes, Asheville 

3:15 — Music 

3 :20 — Messages from Visiting Chaplains 

3 :40 — The Rural Pastor at Work J. C. Canipe, Boone 

4 :00 — The Present Situation of Our Rural Churches 

Fon S. Scofield, Rolesville Church, Wake Forest 

4:20— Some Observations of a Country Preacher R. T. Stancil, Garner 

4:45— Adjourn 

Monday Evening 

7 :30 — Praise and Worship E. R. Stewart, Windsor 

7 :40 — Business 

7 :50— City Mission F. D. Hemphill, Durham 

8:10 — Conference: The Place of the Rural Church in the Life of the South 

Led by Garland A. Hendricks, Olive Chapel Church, Apex 

9 :00 — Preaching in War Time J. B. Weatherspoon, Louisville, Ky. 



Adjourn 



J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs, President 

W. C. Reed, Kinston, Vice President 

J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer City, Secretary 



60 N. C. Baptist State Convention 



LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

ALLEGHANY (6)— G. R. Blackburn, Whitehead; John M. Cheek, Sparta; Mr. and Mrs. 

J. T. Fender, Whitehead; Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Joines, Sparta. 
ALEXANDER (5) Jeffie Daniels, Charles E. Echerd, Taylorsville; Homer L. Good, 

Stony Point; E. C. Shoe, A. E. Watts, Taylorsville. 
ASHE (3)— R. C. Ashley, Bina; G. C. Burkett, Jefferson; M. D. Hart, Husk. 
ATLANTIC (2)— A. L. Benton, Swansboro; John H. Bunn, Morehead City. 
AVERY (2)— D. M. Edmisten, R. T. Teague, Newland. 
BEULAH (8)— Mrs. Z. R .Clayton, Longhurst; L. V. Coggins, Semora; B. C. Lamb, 

Route 4, Danville, Va. ; Mrs. F. W. Rogers, Roxboro; P. T. Worrell, Yanceyville; A. 

F. Yarbrough, Milton; Rev. and Mrs. R. W. Hovis. 
BLADEN (1)— R. J. Hall, Bladenboro. 

BLUE RIDGE (8)— Jeta P. Baker, East Marion; B. F. Bray, Jr., R. I. Corbett, C. C. 
Parker, W. C. Pate, Marion; L. G. Redding, R. L. Smith, D. C. Wesson, Old Fort. 

BRUNSWICK (1)— A. L. Brown, Southport. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (5)— D. E. Elledge, North Wilkesboro; Howard J. Ford, J. F. 
Jordan, Wilkesboro; John W. Kincheloe, Jr., North Wilkesboro; T. E. Story, Wilkes- 
boro. 

BUNCOMBE (25)— Jack R. Bagwell, Fairview; Willis Bennett, Oteen; C. R. Browning, 

G. Carlton Cox, J. B. Grice, Asheville; Rev. and Mrs. R. P. Hamby, Swannanoa; M. 
W. Hamrick, Asheville; William L. Hatcher, Ridgecrest; Ralph R. Hensley, Candler; 
H. M. Hocutt, Biltmore; J. J. Johnson, Ridgecrest; Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Johnson, H. 
R. Logan, Asheville; Hight C. Moore, Ridgecrest; J. C. Pipes, Asheville; H. A. Quick, 
Candler; Rev. and Mrs. C. F. Rogers, Asheville; Elizabeth Waite, Tom E. Walters, 
Ridgecrest; Rev. and Mrs. J. N. Watson, Jackie Watson, Black Mountain. 

BURNT SWAMP (4)— L. W. Jacobs, Roy W. Maynor, Rev. and Mrs. P. A. Under- 
wood, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (27)— Mrs. W. H. Austin, S. D. Baker, Kannapolis; John H. Connell, J. 
T. Davis, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. T. W. Fogleman, J. C. Gwaltney, Kannapolis; H. 
F. Goodwin, Grady J. Haynes, C. E. Herrin, Concord; Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Hiatt, 
Ann James, W. Walter Jones, Kannapolis; Rev. and Mrs. H. E. Nash, Concord; J. 
C. Ray, E. C. Roach, David Robinette, Kannapolis; Z. W. Rotan, Concord; Mrs. M. 
A. Snell, Harrisburg; T. H. Steen, E. S. Summers, Concord; Mr. and Mrs. William 
Taylor, Newell; Rev. and Mrs. J. S. Tyson, Kannapolis. 

CALDWELL (14)— Mrs. C. M. Abernethy, H. S. Benfield, Lenoir; R. B. Burnett, Hud- 
son; Zeb A. Caudle, Lenoir; P. D. Fletcher, Granite Falls; Baine Harris, Hudson; 
Ruth Keller, Granite Falls; Dr. and Mrs. O. R. Mangum, Lenoir; Cade Shaver, Hud- 
son; J. M. Shaver, L. E. Snipes, Granite Falls; Edith Steele, Lenoir; S. A. Stroup, 
Granite Falls. 

CAROLINA (5)— B. G. Henry, Tryon; Charles W. Mainwaring, A. V. Reese, O. M. 
Seigler, Hendersonville; E. M. Walker, Tuxedo. 

CATAWBA RIVER (13)— C. A. Abernethy, Icard; Rev. and Mrs. John P. Crouch, 
Valdese; Fred Forester, Drexel; Mrs. J. E. Fulton, Valdese; E. M. Hairfield, Rev. and 
Mrs. Elbert F. Hardin, Carl Hemphill, M. L. Lewis, John D. McCready, Morganton; 
W. L. McSwain, Glen Alpine; R. H. Weaver, Valdese. 

CENTRAL (39)— Rev. and Mrs. H. W. Baucom, Sr., Olin T. Binkley, S. W. Brewer, 
Wake Forest; T. W. Brewer, L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Carroll, 
Wake Forest; H. E. Cherry, John L. Coley, Raleigh; J. Allen Easley, Wake Forest; 
Mrs. J. S. Farmer, G. H. Ferguson, Raleigh; Bruce V. Hartsell, Franklinton; H. A. 
Helms, M. A. Huggins, Raleigh; A. W. Icard, C. J. Jackson, Wake Forest; Mrs. D. 
R. Jackson, Donald R. Jackson, Jr., Raleigh; T. H. King, Thurman Kitchin, Wake 
Forest; E. L. Layfield, LeRoy Martin, Mr. and Mrs. W. Reid Martin, Margie Murchi- 
son, Raleigh; Eugene Olive, G. W. Paschal, Ernest P. Russell, Fon H. Scofield, Jr., 
Wake Forest; D. F. Stamps, Rev. and Mrs. Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh; Rev. and 
Mrs. M. M. Turner, Zebulon; Mr. and Mrs. B. Y. Tyner, W. H. Weatherspoon, 
Raleigh. 



Annual of Session 1943 61 

CHOWAN (20) — Annie Hope Blanchard, Hobbsville; D. Palmer Brooks, Elizabeth; Rev. 
and Mrs. J. T. Byrum, W. F. Cale, Jr., Tyner; Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford; W. I. 
Johnson, Elizabeth City; J. T. Lennon, Swan Quarter; Mrs. W. T. Love, Elizabeth 
City; Rev. and Mrs. Herbert P. Miller, Sunbury; Eloise Miller, Mrs. D. H. Parnell, 
Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Potts, W. R. Stephens, Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City; Charles 
B. Williams, Shiloh; Rev. and Mrs. S. B. Wilson, Creswell. 

COLUMBUS (9)— Winfrey Davis, Tabor City; Elbert N. Johnson, Fair Bluff; Rev. and 
Mrs. S. N. Lamb, Whiteville; Rev. and Mrs. G. Carl Lewis, Chadbourn; R. J. Ras- 
berry, Hallsboro; G. M. Singletary, Cerro Gordo; J. B. Wyche, Hallsboro. 

EASTERN (11) — T. N. Cooper, Calypso; C. H. Hornsby, Clinton; Mack Herring, Mount 
Olive; L. L. Johnson, Magnolia; J. L. Jones, Rose Hill; Geo. M. Kelley, Magnolia; 
Donald G. Myers, Mount Olive; Rev. and Mrs. J. B. Sessoms, Magnolia; G. Nan 
Stephens, Warsaw; Edward A. Walker, Clinton. 

ELKIN (4)— Miss Addie Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. James, E. G. Jordan, Elkin. 

FLAT RIVER (4)— M. L. Bannister, B. D. Bunn, W. D. Poe, Oxford; J. Marshall 
Walk», Stovall. 

FRENCH BROAD (8) — Hoyt Blackwell, J. J. Buckner, Dr. and Mrs. Walt N. Johnson, 
M. H. Kendall, Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Moore, Frank Rogers, Mars Hill. 

GASTON (35) — M. L. Barnes, O. H. Bolch, Dr. and Mrs. B. A. Bowers, Rev. and Mrs. 
Charles P. Burchette, Jr., Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. E. J. Caldwell, North Belmont; 
L. S. Clark, Mount Holly; Mr. and Mrs. Hubert M. Craig, Stanley; Rev. and Mrs. 
L. M. Dixon, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. E. S. Elliott, Cherryville; P. A. Hicks, Bel- 
mont; W. Arthur Hoffman, Gastonia; E. V. Hudson, Cramerton; Hubert Huggins, 
Dallas; John W. Hughston, Jr., Belmont; A. W. Kincaid, Bessemer City; A. V. Led- 
ford, W. A. Loudermilk, Gastonia; J. D. McAllester, Dallas; L. A. McClure, Alexis; 
Floyd J. Noblett, Bessemer City; C. E. Phillips, Gastonia; Mrs. Dorothy Rhine- 
hardt, Belmont; M. T. Saunders, Bessemer City; Ernest M. Smith, McAdenville; J. 
A. Snow, Stanley; Loy Stroupe, Cherryville; Rev. and Mrs. J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer 
City; J. L. Vipperman, Dallas. 

GREEN RIVER (4)— L. P. Barnette, Union Mills; Charles A. Griffith, Columbus; James 
W. Ray, Spindale; C. N. Royal, Rutherfordton. 

HAYWOOD (14)— Rev. and Mrs. James H. Christie, Lysbeth Cox, Rev. and Mrs. H. G. 
Hammett, S. Madge Lewis, Waynesville; Dr. and Mrs. H. K. Masteller, Canton; Mr. 
and Mrs. J. R. Morgan, Waynesville; Rev. and Mrs. T. H. Parris, Clyde; C. R. 
Upton, Canton; H. C. Wilburn, Waynesville. 

JOHNSTON (14)— E. Y. Averett, Benson; F. H. Brooks, Smithfield; G. McLeod Bryan, 
Garner; E. G. Caudill, Smithfield; W. S. Caudle, Route 2, Raleigh; Durward Creech, 
Dewey B. Dupree, Smithfield; Tom M. Freeman, Selma; C. L. Gillespie, Smithfield; 
Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, Clayton; Robert P. Holding, A. C. McCall, Smithfield; H. E. 
Mitchiner, Wilson Mills; Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN (21)— B. F. Austin, Kings Mountain; W. P. Biggerstaff, Jesse 
Blalock, O. B. Bridges, D. Boyd Cannon, Shelby; J. W. Costner, Lawndale; Horace 
Easom, W. A. Elam, Shelby; P. L. Elliott, Boiling Springs; Hugh F. Harrill, Latti- 
more; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs; D. E. McCraw, O. M. Mull, Shelby; L. J. 
Rainey, Grover; Lawrence Roberts, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Sargent, Kings 
Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Suttle, Shelby; Lula Mae Teague, Kings Mountain; 
Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

LIBERTY (55)— C. B. Atkinson, Erlanger; Mrs. Beamer H. Barnes, Thomasville; W. 
H. Beck, Lexington; Tom W. Bray, Zelma Clinard, J. A. Cox, Thomasville; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. L. Craver, Lexington; Thomas B. Flowe, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville; 
Dr. and Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Lexington; Mrs. R. S. Green, Mr. and Mrs. I. G. 
Greer, Thomasville; Ila L. Hensley, F. G. Johnson, Lexington; Mrs. Thomas Melton 
Jones, Thomasville; Mrs. Irene Justice, Lexington; R. L. Kizer, Thomasville; Mrs. 
W. J. Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. John B. Lane, Lexington; W. H. Lomax, Linwood; 
F. A. Maier, Thomasville; L. A. Martin, Lexington; Rev. and Mrs. L. J. Matthews, 
Route 5, Winston-Salem; B. A. Mitchell, Kemersville; Sallie L. McCracken, W. K. 
McGee, Mr. and Mrs. John Arch McMillan, Louise McMillan, Thomasville; Clarence 
F. Moore, Mrs. Laura Moore, Route 2, High Point; Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Morgan, 
John Murphies, H. C. Myers, Lexington; T. H. Small, Thomasville; Mr. and Mrs. 
Maskey M. Smith, Route 6, Winston-Salem; Mrs. W. A. Smith, Lexington; J. A. 



62 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Neilson, Thomasville; Charles R. Sharpe, Sam J. Smith, Lexington; Rev. and Mrs. 
H. M. Stroup, Denton; L. E. Teague, Thomasville; Nolan Teague, Rev. and Mrs. 
N. C. Teague, C. M. Wall, Charles S. Young, Lexington. 

LITTLE RIVER (16)— Laurie J. Atkinson, Lillington; Dr. and Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn; 
Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek; Lilian Draughan, T. H. Finch, Dunn; Charles B. 
Howard, Buie's Creek; Sam F. Hudson, Lillington; E. C. Keller, Dunn; R. V. McNull, 
Broadway; Forest Maxwell, Erwin; S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn; C. E. Ruffin, Broadway; 
J. A. Tumblin, Buie's Creek; Rev. and Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier. 

MACON (7)— H. M. Alley, Highlands; Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Benfield, Rev. and Mrs. J. 
F. Marchman, C. C. Welch, Franklin; Robert Williams, Dillard, Ga. 

MECKLENBURG (40)— C. R. Austin, David E. Bobbitt, S. K. Brazil, T. P. Christmas, 
Paul E. Crandall, F. E. Dabney, Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Dawson, J. W. Digh, Char- 
lotte; Rev. and Mrs. R. Love Dixon, Huntersville; Paul K. Drum, Cornelius; Oscar 
Funderburke, Paw Creek; E. W. Haight, George D. Heaton, George L. Hocutt, John 
R. Knott, W. W. Lawton, Jr., Mrs. F. D. Lethco, Luther Little, E. T. Martin, Mrs. 
John P. Motsinger, J. Lloyd Mauney, J. D. Moose, Charlotte; Hubert S. "Mumford, 
Matthews; M. G. Perry, Mrs. Charles R. Price, C. W. Propst, Charlotte; R. D. Rig- 
gins, Derita; Fred C. Roberts, Mrs. E. Banks Ross, E. L. Spivey, Charlotte; Rev. and 
Mrs. M. W. Stallings, Davidson; W. A. Stephenson, Preston S. Vann, Dr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Harrison Williams, A. B. Wood, J. Clyde Yates, Charlotte. 

MITCHELL (2) W. T. Baucom, E. F. Watson, Spruce Pine. 

MONTGOMERY (2)— Charles E. Stevens, Mount Gilead; Charles B. Trammel, Troy. 

MOUNT ZION (SO)— W. C. Adkinson, Swepsonville; Rev. and Mrs. Henry B. Ander- 
son, Durham; Mrs. R. H. Andrews, Burlington; Ernest W. Bailes, Durham; Das 
Kelley Barnett, Chapel Hill; C. E. Byrd, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Byrd, Durham; N. A. 
Catlett, Cary; Mr. and Mrs. K. B. Cole, Carrboro; Trela D. Collins, Durham; R. P. 
Ellington, Graham; Mrs. Justice Haswell, Mrs. C. L. Haywood, F. D. Hemphill, 
Durham; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex; Charles F. Hudson, J. M. Johnson, J. Samuel 
Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. Charles Jollay, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. A. D. Kinnett, Bur- 
lington; Rev. and Mrs. John H. Knight, Mebane; J. H. Lackey, Alamance; Frank H. 
Marshall, B. E. Morris, Durham; Luther A. Nail, Burlington; J. Winston Pearce, 
Dr. and Mrs. D. R. Perry, H. W. Pickett, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Poe, Durham; Mrs. 
J. R. Poindexter, Burlington; J. H. Rich, Chapel Hill; Elizabeth Riggs, Durham; 
Mrs. J. E. Sharpe, Hillsboro; M. D. Smith, Haw River; W. E. Stanley, Durham; 
Rev. and Mrs. A. P. Stephens, Burlington; Z. B. Teel, Mildred Thomas, Durham; 
J. H. Waugh, Jr., Burlington; John T. Wayland, Mrs. R. B. Wilkins, Durham. 

NEUSE (9)— A. B. Alderman, Snow Hill; Talmage C. Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. W. C. 
Reed, Kinston; Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, Chaplain and Mrs. Joe Woodson, Goldsboro. 

NEW SOUTH RIVER (12)— Delmer C. Blalock, E. B. Booker, M. W. Chapman, Rev. 
and Mrs. W. Perry Crouch, Waldo D. Early, G. C. Hamrick, Mary Humphrey, John 
A. Oates, Rev. and Mrs. Edwin F. Perry, E. N. Teague, Fayetteville. 

PEE DEE (IS) — Bruce Benton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; Rev. and 
Mrs. R. A. Ellis, Wadesboro; Mr. and Mrs. Claude Gore, T. W. Hearne, Rockingham; 
O. W. McManus, Gibson; J. C. Meigs, Pageland, S. C. ; Rev. and Mrs. Frank R. 
Moore, Ellerbe; Rev. and Mrs. James B. Turner, Laurinburg; J. B. Willis, Hamlet. 

PIEDMONT (73)— J. M. Allred, Pomona; J. H. Boles, High Point; Phila M. Ballard, 
Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Barker, High Point; Mrs. J. Carl Bell, L. Grady 
Burgiss, Greensboro; Mrs. W. O. Burnham, Mrs. W. F. Clayton, High Point; J. B. 
Clifton, Greensboro; C. G. Coe, Pomona; J. H. Collins, Greensboro; A. B. Conrad, 
Mrs. C. E. Crissman, High Point; J. Huber Dixon, Pleasant Garden; Albert H. 
Duning, High Point; J. Ben Eller, Greensboro; C. M. Floyd, Thomasville; Mrs. E. 
R. Fruitt, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Gillespie, Ruth Gosney, Reidsville; Rev. 
and Mrs. Ray W. Harrington, Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Hodge, Mrs. Nettie Hoge, Greens- 
boro; Rev. and Mrs. Julien S. Hopkins, Rev. and Mrs. Irby B. Jackson, Rev. and 
Mrs. R. R. Jackson, High Point; Wade H. James, Mrs. W. C. Kanoy, Fred Koerber, 
Greensboro; G. G Lanter, Winston-Salem; Mrs. O. E. Lee, Greensboro; A. C. Love- 
lace, High Point; Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Martin, Mrs. R. A. Matheson, Greensboro; 
Hughey O. Miller, High Point; Mrs. F. S. Miles, Chaplain and Mrs. O. Floyd Mont- 
gomery, A. L. McGee, Greensboro; C. M. Oates, Pomona; D. W. Overby, Reidsville: 
Thelma Patrick, High Point; Mrs. J. P. Pugh, Mrs. J. N. Reele, Greensboro; Lee 



Annual of Session 1943 63 

Roach, Guilford College; T. L. Sasser, Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Saunders, Greensboro; 
Richard R. Saunders, Reidsville; Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Scott, Mrs. Charles E. Siceloff, 
R. L. Smith, W. L. Smith, Roger Snipes, Rev. and Mrs. J, T. Swinson, High Point; 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Mrs. Stafford Webb, Greensboro; Dr. and Mrs. Howard 
L. Weeks, Reidsville; James E. Wiggs, Greensboro; Mrs. Nash Wilkins, Reidsville; 
Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (58)— Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem; C. M. Beach, 
Leaksville; Ray Billings, Winston-Salem; Willard A. Brown, Madison; Rev. and Mrs. 
Guy S. Cain, Rural Hall; Rev. and Mrs. Avery M. Church, L. L. Coats, Mrs. John 
H. Cornelius, J. M. Current, E. L. Davis, Sr., Mrs. J. Neal Davis, Winston-Salem; 
J. P. Davis, Leaksville; Mrs. C. W. Davis, Winston-Salem; Robert C. Foster, Leaks- 
ville; C. W. Glosson, Kernersville; Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. 
L. C. Hall, Mayodan; Mrs. R. W. Hampton, Rev. and Mrs. James M. Hayes, Ralph A. 
Herring, Winston-Salem; Ronald D. Hicks, Germanton; J. Guy Hopkins, Draper; T. 
C. Keaton, Mrs. Linton J. Keith, Winston-Salem; J. E. Kirk, Lewisville; J. A. Kirk- 
man, T. S. Lawrence, Winston-Salem; E. A. Long, Germanton; M. E. Manuel, Rev. 
and Mrs. B. K. Mason, Santford Martin, Marshall L. Mott, C. E. Parker, Mrs. J. 
J. Roddick, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Mallie Scott, Walnut Cove; Rev. and Mrs. V. W. 
Sears, Rural Hall; Richard Smith, Draper; Herbert M. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Rev. 
and Mrs. M. C. Swicegood, Clemmons; James E. Swinson, Hanes; Burley S. Turner, 
Otis E. Tucker, W. D. Turner, Carey B. Taylor, Winston-Salem; C. V. Tyner, Mrs. 
P. E. White, Leaksville; D. H. Wilcox, Winston-Salem; Mary Wise, Clemmons; L. 

B. Womble, Roy V. Young, Winston- Salem. 

RALEIGH (27)— Kathryn Abee, M. O. Alexander, Mrs. Ford A. Burns, Carlyle Camp- 
bell, Mr. and Mrs. Z. M. Caveness, Mary Currin, Raleigh; Mrs. Delia P. Daughtry, 
Fuquay Springs; L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. C. O. Greene, Cary; 
Rev. and Mrs. George J. Griffin, Raleigh; Albert S. Lamm, Wake Forest; John R. Link, 
Apex; F. Orion Mixon, L. L. Morgan, Raleigh; J. Gray Murray, Cary; Rev. and Mrs. 
S. A. Rhyne, Lillington; Lee C. Sheppard, Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Simms, Sr., Mar- 
garet Sparks, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. Ryburn T. Stancil, Garner; G. W. Stevens, 
Raleigh. 

RANDOLPH (10)— Mrs. Erman S. Cox, Mrs. Gerald K. Ford, R. E. Hiatt, Mrs. J. R. 
Hill, Mrs. E. S. Millsaps, Asheboro; C. L. Moffitt, Ramseur; Rev. and Mrs. Bruce H. 
Price, Asheboro; S. L. Riddle, Randleman; Mrs. D. C. Scott, Asheboro. 

ROANOKE (36)— Mrs. Frank Armstrong, Sr., Nashville; Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson; R. 
O. Bennett, Jr., Wake Forest; G. W. Bullard, RockyMount; R. A. Cadle, Enfield; 
A. Hartwell Campbell, Greenville; E. C. Chamblee, Farmville; S. V. T. Chamblee, 
Nashville; Edward G. Cole, Winterville; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; R. L. Collins, 
Wilson; R. L. Councilman, G. N. Cowan, Rocky Mount; Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Craw- 
ford, Lynda Jean Crawford, Hobgood; George W. Davis. Farmville; Benjamin C. 
Fisher, Nashville; W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck; Harry C. Hand, Whitakers; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Holmes, Farmville; M. M. Johnson, Spring Hope; Mr. and Mrs. E. L. 
Jordan, Nashville; Roy D. Keller, Fountain; J. W. Kincheloe, Sr., Raymond Clyde 
Lanier, H. C. Lowder, Rocky Mount; Lee A. Phillips, Plymouth; Alfred L. Pollock, 
Red Oak; Charles J. Shields, Scotland Neck; Bennett Stone, Nashville; Rev. and 
Mrs. J. V. Watterson, Stantonsburg; R. L. Wilson, Ayden. 

ROBESON (16)— E. F. Baker, J. Glenn Blackburn, Dr. and Mrs. C. H. Durham, Lum- 
berton; J. M. Gibbs, Parkton; R. A. Hedgepeth, Lumberton; C. P. Herring, Fairmont; 

C. R. Hester, Edna Porter, Saint Pauls; Troy Jones, Red Springs; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. Earl Robinson, R. S. Sessoms, Saint Pauls; Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Whisnant, 
Raeford. 

ROWAN (22) — Rev. and Mrs. Smoot Baker, Spencer; Rev. and Mrs. Milton L. Braun, 
Salisbury; R. O. Brinkley, Spencer; Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Davis, Mrs. Tom Goggin, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Hasty, R. N. Huneycutt, Salisbury; Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Kiser, 
Concord; D. H. Lowder, C. R. Myers, Rev. and Mrs. C. A. Rhyne, Salisbury; W. A. 
Roberts, J. T. Sisk, China Grove; Mrs. J. E. Smith, W. D. Williamson, Myrtle H. 
Zentmeyer. 

SANDY CREEK (17)— Rev. and Mrs. K. E. Bryant, Pittsboro; Mrs. Colin Churchill, 
V. M. Dorsett, Alfred F. Gibson, Siler City; George M. Graham, Olivia; W. H. 
Griffin, Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; Roy A. Morris, Sanford; Carl Lee Ousley, Mr. 
and Mrs. R. F. Paschal, Siler City; J. F. Stegall, Jonesboro; Clyde P. Stimson, 



64 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Goldston; Rev. and Mrs. J. Fred Stimson, Southern Pines; Walter L. Warfford, 
Carthage. 

SANDY RUN (15)— L. V. Bradley, Jr., Henrietta; W. G. Camp, Mooresboro; F. T. 
Collins, Forest City; B. A. Cooper, Spindale; W. R. Grigg, Caroleen; Fred H. Doty, 
Ellenboro; Rev. and Mrs. J. L. McCIuney, Henrietta; A. M. Martin; Ellenboro; C. 
C. Matheny, Forest City; Joe Parsons, Spindale; R. A. Pate, Bostic; W. H. Poin- 
dexter, Gaffney, S. C; W. V. Tarlton, Cliffside; E. P. White, Rutherfordton. 

SOUTH FORK (23)— R. Knolan Benfield, Hickory; Rev. and Mrs. Yancey C. Elliott, 
Lincolnton; Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Frances, Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Hatfield, Charles C. 
Holland, W. C. Laney, Hickory; Bruce B. Littleton, Lincolnton; Hoyle Love, Newton; 
R. G. Mace, Catawba; Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Myers, Newton; Robert M. Perry, J. 
Louis Price, Thomas P. Pruitt, Hickory; W. W. Rimmer, Lincolnton; R. C. Shearin, 
E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; Rev. and Mrs. O. S. Ulmer, Newton; A. R. Waters, Catawba. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN (1)— O. S. Long, Casar. 

SOUTH YADKIN (28)— Victor L. Andrews, Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. H. W. Baucom, 
Jr., H. G. Bryant, Statesville; W. M. Byers, Troutman; J. B. Cain, Cana; Eugene 
Deese, Troutman; Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Dodd, Mrs. J. H. Fulghum, Mocksville; 
Harry Y. Gamble, Statesville; E. B. Hicks, Harmony; Rev. and Mrs. R. Von King, 
H. Fletcher Lambert, Hugh McElrath, Statesville; S. P. Orders, Mooresville; Mrs. 
J. E. Owings, Mocksville; G. L. Royster, Colleemee; W. G. Russell, Mooresville; 
Jacob Stewart, Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. A. T. Stoudenmire, Cleveland; Frank 
Tatum, Cooleemee; Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Turner, Mocksville; Charles H. Utley, Cana. 

STANLY (14)— L. P. Beck, Badin; J. N. Blalock, Norwood; W. J. Bradley, Albemarle; 
L. Vernon Connell, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. L. W. Fields, Norwood; Rev. and Mrs. 
C. R. Hinton, W. A. Hough, Norwood; L. D. Munn, Badin; D. J. Robinson, New 
London; W. J. Russell, J. A. Seymour, Julius W. Whitley, Albemarle. 

SURRY (11) — Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Bray, Lonnie A. Fleming, Willa B. Marks, Rev. and 
Mrs. C. E. Otey, Rev. and Mrs. R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy; Rev. and Mrs. J. F. 
Sellers, White Plains; C. A. Simmons, Mount Airy. 

TAR RIVER (9)— J. Edward Allen, Warrenton; A. Paul Bagby, Louisburg; R. E. 
Brickhouse, Warrenton; Rex R. Campbell, Louisburg; E. W. Greene, Morton Miles, 
Jr., Henderson; C. B. Peacock, Castalia; Rev. and Mrs. Albert E. Simms, Littleton. 

TENNESSEE RIVER (1)— William H. Covert, Bryson City. 

THREE FORKS (10)— Mrs. E. A. Baucom, Blowing Rock; Wade E. Brown, J. C. 
. Canipe, Boone; Mrs. T. H. Coffey, Sr., Blowing Rock; R. C. Eggers, Zionville; Rev. 
and Mrs. G. A. Hamby, Balm; Louise Green, Boone; Mrs. Lloyd Robbins, J. H. 
Winkler, Blowing Rock. 

TRANSYLVANIA (2)— S. F. McAuley, W. H. Whitlock, Brevard. 

TUCKASEIGEE (6)— B. S. Hensley, Sylva; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee; Gretchen John- 
son, Magnolia; Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Pettit, Sylva; W. H. Smith, East La Port. 

UNION (10)— C. C. Burris, Wingate; W. B. Carr, Marshville; Joel C. Herrin, Wingate; 
Rev. N. S. Joyner, Waxhaw'; Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Link, Jr., J. M. Pickler, Wingate; 
M. L. Ross, Concord; Lloyd W. Teague, Camp Sutton; Percy B. Upchurch, Monroe. 

WEST CHOWAN (6)— Rev. and Mrs. J. Wade Baker, Rich Square; Oscar Creech, 
Ahoskie; Rev. and Mrs. John E. Lanier, Winton; Elliot R. Stewart, Windsor. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (5)— R. Lane Akins, Hayesville; J. C. Ammons, A. 
B. Cash, Peyton G. Ivie, Murphy; L. P. Smith, Andrews. 

WILMINGTON (21)— C. E. Baker, Sankey L. Blanton, Earle L. Bradley, Rev. and 
Mrs. James H. Butler, J. Roy Clifford, Wilmington; Rev. and Mrs. J. B. Dosher, 
Kelly; Rev. and Mrs. J. N. Evans, Jr., Wallace; Ira D. Ferrell, W. C. Francis, Vivian 
Grant, Wilmington; Lewis E. Ludlum, Carolina Beach; Mrs. W. I. Morgan, Wilming- 
ton; Pat Murphy, Jr., Wallace; L. C. Pinnix, Rev. and Mrs. David K. Shelton, 
Jacksonville; E. G. VanLandingham, Carolina Beach; J. O. Walton, Wilmington. 

YADKIN (7)— J. G. Allgood, Yadkinville; Mrs. W. E. Brooks, Mrs. Paul P. Davis, 
Yadkinville; Paul Forsythe, G. H. Hudler, Mrs. O. C. Motsinger, Mrs. C. R. Transou, 
Boonville. 

YANCEY (4)— J. H. Black, Windom; Laura Mae Hilliard, A. Z. Jamerson, Burnsville; 
Ben Lee Ray, Pensacola. 

Total Messengers: 952. 



Annual of Session 1943 65 

VISITORS (201) — Carolyn Allred, Mrs. J. M. Allred, Pomona; Mrs. J. B. Armstrong, 
Winston-Salem; Mrs. F. M. Autry, High Point; Mrs. J. M. Barbee, Mrs. Robert 
Barbee, Greensboro; Clifford Barratt, Greenwood, S. C; J. I. Bishop, Birmingham, Ala.; 
S. C. Blackburn, Keystone, W. Va.; Mrs. Louise L. Blake, Thomasville; Edward M. 
Bostick, Jr., Saluda; Daisie B. Bowers, Littleton; Mrs. C. N. Bray, Siler City; O. B. 
Bridges, Shelby; Mrs. W. M. Byers, Troutman; Mrs. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; Cora 
Lee Cannon, Durham; M. L. Carr, Floyd F. Carter, Mrs. Jesse Carter, Winston-Salem; 
M. J. Clarke, Fayetteville; Mrs. Walter E. Clark, Asheville; Bernie Clodfelter, Winston- 
Salem; Mrs. R. I. Corbett, Marion; R. M. Corn, Asheville; Mrs. Robert M. Cornette, 
Norfolk, Va. ; Erman S. Cox, Asheboro; M. L. Craver, Welcome; Elva Creech, Mrs. 
Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; Mrs. Ed Crisco, High Point; C. C. Crow, Shelby; Mrs. S. B. 
Crump, Thomasville; G. D. Danner, Chatham, Va. ; E. L. Davis, Jr., Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. George W. Davis, Farmville; Mrs. R. T. Davis, Winston-Salem; William H. Davis, 
Hendersonville; Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford; Mrs. Lula Doggett, W. W. Dog- 
gett, Summerfield; Hattie Edwards, Thomasville; James L. Elder, Camp Mackall; Mary 
Lee Ernest, Greenville; Mrs. C. J. Essex, Winston-Salem; Hubert L. Evans, Jonesville; 
C. W. Flowers, Angier; Thomas D. Flynn, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Howard J. Ford, 
Wilkesboro; Mrs. C. D. Foster, Greensboro; A. D. Frazier, Red Oak; C. C. Freeman, 
Thomasville; Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh; Mrs. R. R. Garvey, Winston-Salem; Mr. and 
Mrs. C. W. Gilliam, Jonesville; Mrs. W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck; Lt. and Mrs. 
John W. Gore, Winston-Salem; Mrs. E. M. Greene, Jr., Clyde; Mae Grimmer, 
Raleigh; Luther B. Grice, Chicago, 111.; Mrs. Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem; Bettie 
Hamilton, Thomasville; V. H. Harrell, Winston-Salem; W. B. Harrington, William- 
ston; Mrs. L. R. Harrill, Raleigh; Mrs. D. S. Hayworth, High Point; J. N. Hare, 
Apex; Minnie Hayworth, High Point; Mrs. Roy Hayworth, Kernersville; E. B. Hicks, 
Harmony; Mrs. S. A. Helms, Greensboro; J. Alex Herring, Greenville, S. C.J Jesse 
H. Hill, Salisbury; Mrs. Sophia Holder, Merry Hill; Thomas C. Holland, Camp 
Butner; Mrs. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh; Mary L. Huggins, Winston-Salem; Mrs. R. 
N. Hunneycutt, Salisbury; W. Wilbur Hutchins, Raleigh; Clotile James, Winston- 
Salem; L. D. Johnson, Danville, Va.; Mrs. Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; John H. 
Jones, Charlotte; May Belle Jones, Spencer; Max Keith, Moody, Mo.; Mrs. J. M. 
Kesler, Winston-Salem; W. H. Kimball, Henderson; Mrs. E. S. King, Winston- 
Salem; H. V. Kinney, Lexington; Mrs. J. E. Kirk, Lewisville; Mrs. Fred Koerben, 
Greensboro; Beulah Lanning, Lexington; Mrs. W. Ray Lashley, Pittsboro; Mrs. H. T. 
Lawrence, Apex; L. K. Lazenby, States ville; R. Cole Lee, Greensboro; Mrs. D. E. 
Lehman, Winston-Salem; Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Lennon, Wake Forest; Raymond Long, 
Elgin Field, Fla.; Mrs. H. T. Lowery, Mrs. G. T. Lumpkin, Winston-Salem; A. E. 
Lynch, Buie's Creek; William W. Lynes, Lenoir; I. Stuart McElroy, Richmond, Va.; 
Mrs. Eugene McLartz, Greensboro; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McLendon, Lexington; E. L. 
Melton, Winston-Salem; E. W. Milner, Fort Bragg; J. W. Marshall, Richmond, Va.; 
Mrs. E. A. Massey, Harmony; W. D. Maynor, Pembroke; Cleo Mitchell, Raleigh; 
Mrs. O. A. Moore, Scotland Neck; E. H. Moore, Greensboro; Mrs. L. B. Moore, 
Kernersville; Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Moore, Raleigh; Mrs. C. W. Mosley, Greensboro; 
Phyllis Anne Myers, Newton; Mrs. R. M. Oakley, Danville, Va.; B. R. Page, Boone; 
Mrs. J. L. Page, Asheville; Mrs. H. W. Pickett, Durham; Mrs. Lena Poe, Ahoskie; 
Mrs. Allie E. Page, Winston-Salem; F. N. Pressly, Asheville; Mrs. P. H. Raines, 
Greensboro; M. F. Reavis, Yadkinville; J. Hampton Rich, Chapel Hill; Sallie 
Rigsbee, Durham; Mrs. D. J. Robinson, New London; E. J. Rogers, Gretna, Va.; 
Mrs. James K. Ray, Spindale; Mrs. Ed Saine, Cherryville; Mrs. Richard R. Saunders, 
Reidsville; C. F. Settlemyre, Central Falls; Mrs. Sharp, Hillsboro; Sara Jane Shaw, 
Pisgah; Mrs. Sadie Shoaf, Winston-Salem; Mrs. W. S. Simmons, Greensboro; Mr. 
and Mrs. C. S. Smith, Elizabethton, Tenn.; Mrs. Robert M. Smith, Mount Airy; Texie 
Sowers, Churchland; Mrs. Ben L. Spence, Greensboro; Mrs. David Strider, Ashe- 
boro; Mrs. E. C. Sutton, Greensboro; Mrs. James E. Swinson, Hanes; Mrs. J. C. 
Tatem, Reidsville; Mrs. L. E. Teague, Thomasville; Marjorie Thompson, Spencer; 
Mrs. G. N. Tinsley, Winston-Salem; G. M. Turner, Danville, Va.; J. W. Turtle, 
Wallburg; Mrs. C. V. Tyner, Leaksville; Mrs. Charles H. Utley, Cana; C. H. Walker, 
Greensboro; J. C. Watkins, Winston-Salem; Mrs. D. C. Wesson, Nancy Ruth Wesson, 
Old Fort; E. C. White, Jr., Greensboro; Pauline L. Whitley, Raleigh; J. H. Wiley, 
Shanghai, China; Mrs. Carl Williams, Danville, Va.; Mrs. P. P. Wilson, Leaksville; 
Mrs. F. J. Wishon, Winston-Salem; Roy Young, Salisbury. 

Total Messengers and Visitors: 1,163. 



REPORT OF 
THE GENERAL BOARD 



71. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

To the one hundred and thirteenth session of the Baptist State Convention 
the General Board presents its report, and in doing so records gratitude to 
God and thanks to the Baptist people of the State. 

The Board believes that on the whole this report is the most encouraging 
that has been presented to the Convention in many years. As will appear 
later, the Board is able to report a far larger income, and what is more 
important a more progressive program carried on throughout the State. 

72. 

THE YEAR 1943 

In these opening paragraphs of the report it is our purpose to point out 
some of the larger things that have been happening. Elsewhere in the report 
these matters will be dealt with more specifically. 

1. In the report of the auditor, which appears later, one will observe that 
substantial financial gains have been made. Our income for the present year 
will be, if the present trend continues, about 30% above that of last year. 
Last year, it will be recalled, we reported a gain of about 30% over the 
preceding year; and in 1941 the gain was some 20% over 1940. The report 
for 1940 showed a total income for all Convention objects, State and South- 
wide, or $707,000. The Convention's income for 1943 will double that amount. 
Last year our income was $1,100,000. This year it will go, apparently, to 
$1,400,000. 

2. The program of activities now being sponsored by the workers of the 
General Board will reach during the present year a total of some 800 
churches. This program is providing a week of teaching, or an evangelistic 
meeting, usually continuing for ten days, in these 800 churches. Thus our 
Convention forces will be enabled to reach almost all of our 2,609 churches 
with such a program in a three-year period. 

3. The effort to build the chapel at Wake Forest has been continued and 
the income for this purpose is larger than for 1942, although it has been 
somewhat disappointing. The Rev. W. H. Moore, who came with the Board 
in July 1942, has continued his faithful efforts in assisting the General Secre- 
tary in securing funds for the completion of the chapel. About a year ago a 
part of the project, the Music and Religion Building, was completed. Since 
that time it has been in use by the Army Finance School, and has helped 
greatly in enabling Wake Forest to meet its obligations. This is especially 
true because the income from regular students has been greatly reduced. The 
main chapel building has been housed in, and at this writing the steeple is 
just about completed. We have needed money to carry on the work, and the 
needs have been larger than the income. Accordingly the Executive Committee 
has borrowed some money with which to continue the work. Several months 
ago it became apparent that the only practical thing to do was to go ahead 
and house in the building. It cannot be used, of course, until it is completed 
inside, but the appearance of this magnificent structure, with its spire some 
two hundred feet above the floor of the main auditorium adds much to the 
Wake Forest campus. The Convention has set its hands to the building of 
this chapel for the college, and we must pursue the task until it is completed. 



70 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Many churches placed something in their 1943 budgets for the chapel, and a 
greater number will place some amount in their budgets for 1944. Appeals 
continue to be made to individuals who made pledges to complete their pay- 
ments, and to those who did not pledge to make a generous donation so that 
the money borrowed may be repaid and the building completed. 

4. The debts of the Convention are now being rapidly reduced. On October 
31 we will owe on the original big educational debt of the Convention a 
balance of $244,500: On the Hospital debt assumed by the Convention we will 
owe on October 31 a balance of $68,000, this in addition to a balance of some 
$24,000 on the original loan in 1923 when the Hospital was erected. At the 
end of the present calendar year we estimate that we shall owe on the original 
educational debt about $200,000, and on the Hospital debt about $80,000. We 
need to keep in mind that as the debt has decreased and our interest rate 
lowered almost all we are now paying is for principal. 

It appears that the total receipts for the Hundred Thousand Club will 
amount to around ninety to one hundred thousand this year. One-half of this 
is used for the reduction of our State Convention debts. We mention this here, 
and in another part of the report we will indicate steps which we believe 
should be undertaken to rid the Convention of debt in 1944. It now appears 
that all agencies of the Southern Convention will be out of debt in 1944, 
so that all funds received through the Hundred Thousand Club in 1944 can 
be used for the reduction of State debts. 

5. We continue to urge pastors and churches to enter the Ministers Re- 
tirement Plan, and a great number have entered during the present year, but 
we have enrolled as yet only about forty per cent of the active pastors in the 
State and only about twenty-five per cent of the churches. Since the inaugura- 
tion of the Plan in 1940 we have forwarded to the Relief and Annuity Board 
as payments by the pastors $62,484.83, the sum of $62,484.83 as payments from 
the churches, and from the Convention $14,507.08, making a total of $139,476.74. 
Since 1941, the year in which the first benefits were paid, annuities and dis- 
ability benefits have been paid aggregating about $17,000. Thus there re- 
mains in the fund about $122,000 in addition to the interest which the fund has 
earned during these years. The Board believes the Plan to be thoroughly 
sound. It has rejoiced to see many needy pastors and widows of pastors 
receiving age and disability benefits. Once again every pastor and church 
is urged to enter the Plan. Attention is called again also to the fact that a 
pastor may enter on a 2%, 3% or 4% basis, and benefits will be figured 
accordingly. Once again also we call attention to the fact that a pastor 
and his church, or churches, may enter at any time during the present year 
and by remitting past due payments have the membership dated as of January 
1, 1943. However, no payments can be accepted for the years 1940, 1941 or 
1942. This has been pointed out over and over again, and here again it is 
repeated for emphasis. Pastors, therefore, who permit 1943 to pass with- 
out entering must begin with 1944, thus receiving in the end an annuity 
reduced accordingly. 

6. The Convention in 1942 adopted the following recommendation made 
to it by the General Board : 

"That the Board be authorized and empowered to provide an 
amount in the neighborhood of five to six thousand dollars, the 
amount to be expended in the interest of securing a dry State at 



Annual of Session 1943 71 

the earliest possible moment ; that authority be granted the Board 
to cooperate with other denominations in the promotion of this 
work, or, failing in this, to proceed by employing one or more men 
on a part time or full time basis." 

Pursuant to this recommendation many Baptists and members of other 
denominations were called to meet in Raleigh in March of this year. In that 
enthusiastic meeting steps were taken to organize the Christian forces of 
the State, with the result that in a later meeting the Allied Church League 
for the Abolition of Beverage Alcohol, Inc., was organized. A charter was 
secured, and an Executive Committee, made up of representatives of about 
a dozen denominations in the State, was elected. At a later date this Executive 
Committee selected Mr. L. A. Martin, a deacon and Sunday school teacher in 
the First Baptist Church of Lexington, as Executive Director, and Mr. Martin 
began work on July 1 of this year. Thus a part of the appropriation made by 
our convention last year for this purpose has been used. It is gratifying to 
learn that other denominations in their annual meetings, held this fall, have 
appointed trustees and made appropriations out of their funds for the support 
of the League. 

The Certificate of Incorporation of the League states that the objects for 
which the corporation was formed are as follows : 

(1) To promote Christian citizenship and civic righteous- 
ness, including sobriety and total abstinence. 

(2) To ascertain, assemble and disseminate scientific facts 
regarding alcoholic beverages and the physical, mental, social 
and moral effects of their use; to prepare, print, publish and dis- 
tribute letters, circulars, pamphlets, papers and other printed ma- 
terial regarding alcoholic beverages ; to organize and prosecute 
campaigns and work against alcoholic beverages, along educa- 
tional, legislative and all other lines ; and to engage in all forms 
of activities to combat the manufacture and sale of alcoholic 
beverages. 

The By-Laws of the League have the following provisions : 

Section 1. The operations of this Corporation shall be con- 
trolled by a Board of Trustees. They shall have complete authority 
to elect officers, to determine rules and regulations for the man- 
agement of the Corporation, to make By-Laws for the Corpora- 
tion and to amend the same, and to direct and control completely 
the affairs and the business of the Corporation. 

Section 2. The members of the initial Board of Trustees shall 
be selected by the Incorporators of this Corporation ; and their 
successors shall be selected as follows : each Denomination that 
has in North Carolina churches for white persons shall be entitled 
to have representation on the Board of Trustees, if they desire 
to participate in the work of this Corporation; this representation 
shall be determined by the number of members in North Carolina 
of each participating Denomination; each Denomination shall 
be entitled to have at least one member on the Board of Trustees, 
irrespective of the size of its membership, and shall be entitled to 
have one additional Trustee for each 10,000 members, or major 



72 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

fraction thereof, within North Carolina. From time to time, each 
Denomination will select the persons whom it desires to serve as 
Trustees, and report the names of these nominees to the President 
of this Corporation; and said nominees shall be elected by the 
Board of Trustees, at its next meeting, to be members of the Board 
to succeed those members already on the Board as representatives 
of each respective Denomination. Each Denomination shall de- 
termine for itself the manner in which it will select its nominees. 
If any Denomination does not select or nominate persons to repre- 
sent it on the Board of Trustees, said Board shall have the authority 
to elect as Trustees, upon its own nomination, persons, who are 
members of said Denomination. Members of the Board of Trus- 
tees shall serve one year and until their successors are elected 
and qualified. 

In accordance with these provisions, therefore, this Convention should 
nominate 55 of its members to the present Board of Trustees of the League, 
who, according to the By-Laws, have the power to elect them to member- 
ship. 

7. Last year we made mention of the unusual State Mission opportunities 
presented to us in the defense areas in the eastern part of our State. In our 
attempts to meet these opportunities the Board has tried to follow an aggres- 
sive program. Immanuel Church in Fayetteville has been well-nigh com- 
pleted. The New South River Association has purchased a lot in another 
section of Fayetteville and has some three to four thousand dollars in hand, 
or in sight, with which to begin a building. The Convention will need to put 
into this project an additional three or four thousand. The first unit of the 
Sunset Park Church in Wilmington will be ready for occupancy soon. 
The Board has also purchased a home and two adjacent lots in Carolina 
Beach, where there are now more than five thousand people living. Another 
lot has been purchased in the Lake Forest area of Wilmington, and yet 
another rented in another section of Wilmington. In these areas the Board 
has placed several aggressive young pastors. In last year's report we made 
mention of the excellent work of Edwin F. Perry near Fort Bragg, and 
James H. Butler in Wilmington. Early in the year Lewis E. Ludlum was 
transferred from Jacksonville to Carolina Beach, and his place at Jackson- 
ville was taken by Rev. and Mrs. David K. Shelton, who began work the 
first of June. More recently M. G. Chapman has been secured as a mission- 
ary in the Fayetteville area to aid in establishing a church in the Windsor 
Terrace area, and to do a special mission work in the Spring Lake section. 

We have not done all we should in these areas. We have bought lots and 
expended some money on buildings, but we have been careful not to expend 
a lot of money on buildings where they would be of little or no use as soon 
as the war effort is over. 

We record with appreciation the fact that the Foreign Mission Board has 
let us use for a part of the year several of their missionaries to do work in 
these areas. 

8. A movement in which the Board has been greatly interested has been 
that of securing well-trained young men and young women as associational 
missionaries. We point out that Tom S. Lawrence has been secured by the 
Pilot Mountain Association for full time work. Only recently G. Woodrow 



Annual of Session 1943 73 

Bullard has gone to the Roanoke Association in a similar capacity. For these 
two workers the Board has made no appropriation save for some traveling 
expense for one of them, but in several other associations the Board has 
been happy to meet about half of the expenses involved in securing well- 
trained young women. At the present time one may find Ruth Keller in the 
Caldwell, Willa B. Marks in the Surry, Laura Mae Hilliard in the Yancey 
and French Broad, Madge S. Lewis in the Haywood, and Mrs. Fannie Gib- 
son in the Macon and West Liberty. The Carolina and Ashe associations have 
voted to employ missionaries as soon as they can be found. The same may 
be said also about the Gaston County, the Buncombe, the Wilmington and the 
South Fork. 

It is well known that about all the work and giving in most of the churches 
is done by about one-third of the members. There are multiplied thousands 
of our people who are uninterested and unenlisted. It will be the work of these 
associational missionaries to discover these and lead them into active support 
of all things Baptists are trying to do. They will also, of course, give their 
time in winning others to Christ and to church membership. We record this 
movement here because we think it of great import. 

9. During the year the General Missionaries have conducted association- 
wide revivals in all sections of the State. We do not here attempt to tabulate 
the results in so far as professions of faith, church memberships, etc., are 
concerned. On the whole, however, we have been gratified at the results, 
although we have been almost forced to conclude that a new method in 
evangelism must be discovered. In meeting after meeting it was reported that 
the church members attended the meetings quite well, but somehow the meet- 
ings failed to reach, as was hoped, those outside the church. It is the purpose 
of the Board to continue these efforts, and perhaps try to help in discovering 
new methods. 

10. In the above paragraphs we have called attention to some of the out- 
standing things that have been attempted this year. We call attention to two 
other phases of our work which we have not attempted, but which should 
have attention at the earliest possible moment. 

For two or three years the Convention has authorized the employment of 
a man whose business it would be to visit those who have accumulated prop- 
erty, and who could perhaps become interested in leaving something to some 
of our Baptist institutions. The fact that nothing has been done about this 
has not been due to a lack of appreciation of the task, for we have a deep 
interest in it. The plain truth is we have not as yet been able to find the 
man for this job. If the Convention adopts the recommendations which form 
a part of this report, it is the hope of the Board to continue the search. 

Also we call attention to the fact that little or nothing has been done 
to enlist the men of our churches specifically in the full work of the church. 
Of course in evangelistic meetings and other meetings the general missionaries 
have sought to win the support of the men of our churches to full support of 
the full Baptist program. Recently we discovered that about one-half the 
delegates attending the Methodist Conference are laymen. We Baptists can 
make no such claim for our laymen with respect to attendance upon the 
meeting of the State Convention. They do attend the annual associational 
meetings quite well, we are happy to say. Perhaps we should put our hearts 
and our hands to the task of finding an outstanding layman to give his full 



74 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

time to the task of winning our 100,000 men to a fuller loyalty to Christ and 
the program of the churches and the Convention. 

73. 

THE YEAR 1944 

In 1944, the Lord willing, we should continue to carry on an aggressive 
State Mission program ; we must do all we can for our colleges and for all our 
institutions, but above all the Board believes we must give ourselves with 
abandon to lifting completely the debts now on the Convention. 

As stated elsewhere, the debt of the Convention at the beginning of the 
year 1944 will be about $275,000, this including the balance of the old educa- 
tional debt and the amount assumed for the Hospital. We can easily raise this 
amount in one year without injury to the remainder of our work. Specific 
recommendations with reference to this appear at the end of this report. 
Here, however, we outline briefly what can be done to achieve the purpose 
we have in mind. 

In the first place, the balance of the debt on the Hospital can be raised 
by doubling the offering made on Mother's Day in 1943; and certainly there 
is hardly a church in the State that cannot easily do this. We should go after 
$150,000, using the first $75,000 for taking care of the poor who need to be 
in our Hospital, and with the remainder we can easily lift the debt for which 
the Convention is responsible. 

Then if those who are now members of the Hundred Thousand Club 
will only continue their memberships for one more year, and gifts to the 
Cooperative Program continue with a reasonable increase over the present 
year, we should have no trouble in getting out of debt. Looking forward to 
that happy day the Woman's Missionary Union, in their annual meeting in 
March 1943, adopted the following resolution : 

"That we become not over-joyous in the fact that some of our 
Southwide Boards will perhaps be out of debt in 1943, remember- 
ing that North Carolina is still in debt and we will not have a 
debtless denomination until ALL debts are paid. Therefore, we 
will cooperate with debt-paying plans of the North Carolina State 
Convention." 

Thus if the Convention adopts the recommendation in this report, it appears 
that the full support of the Woman's Missionary Union may be counted on as 
together we try to achieve the objective we have in mind. 

Then in 1945, and we trust thereafter, we can place all our emphasis on 
the Cooperative Program. It is expected that we shall not have to ask our 
people for a special offering in 1945 for the Hundred Thousand Club or the 
Wake Forest chapel. Last year the Board asked for a special offering for 
work around the camps. That offering will not be asked for again in 1944 
unless the Convention so directs. Hence we have had three special offerings 
during the present year which we need not have in 1945. In this matter we 
applaud the action of the Foreign Mission Board in adopting the recom- 
mendation of Secretary Maddry in his recent report to that board : 

"We wish to say a very serious word concerning the Coopera- 
tive Program. This, we believe, is the best method yet devised by 
Southern Baptists for the adequate, continuous, and dependable 
support of all phases of our Baptist work. 



Annual of Session 1943 75 

For twelve years, as a State secretary, we worked in season 
and out of season, for the establishment and success of the Co- 
operative Program as a method for securing funds from the 
churches for the support of all phases of our Baptist work. We are 
still loyal to that Program. We would urge, therefore, that this 
Board instruct all of its secretaries and missionaries to do every- 
thing possible for the success and advancement of the Cooperative 
Program among the churches. We sincerely hope that our mis- 
sionaries on furlough will refrain from asking for special gifts 
for their work abroad, particularly for special gifts from generous- 
hearted brethren and sisters for projects the missionaries may have 
on the way on the mission field. This is one of the most difficult 
and vexing problems confronting your secretaries. We would en- 
treat pastors and churches and State mission boards to keep always 
before our people in the churches the ideal of a fifty-fifty division 
of all funds given by the churches as between local, Statewide, 
southwide, and worldwide causes. We sincerely believe that the 
financial problems of all of our boards, institutions, and agencies 
would be solved if we could induce our people to pay into the 
treasury of the churches a tithe of their income, and then insist 
that a wise and equitable distribution of these sacred funds be 
made between local and world-wide causes. We would, therefore, 
urge all of our missionaries on furlough to speak and plead for 
the whole Cooperative Program of Southern Baptist work and to 
cease, once and for all, the practice of soliciting, directly or in- 
directly, special gifts for their work." 



76 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



74. 



I. RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



We bring to the Convention the letter of the auditor and a brief state- 
ment of receipts and expenditures for the twelve months period ending 
September 30, 1943. At the end of the calendar year, which is the fiscal year 
of the Convention, a more detailed audit for the calendar year 1943 will be 
presented. 



Auditor's Statement 

Executive Committee of the General Board 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Gentlemen: 

According to your instructions, we have audited the books and records of the Convention for the 
twelve months ended September 30, 1943, and prepared the following statements of cash receipts and 
disbursements. 

All cash receipts were found to have been promptly deposited in the banks and disbursements were 
supported by cancelled checks, invoices, etc., with expenses properly classified. Our examination did 
not disclose any evidence of irregularities and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly 
handled and all accounted for. 

After the books have been closed for the current calendar year we will complete the audit and report 
to you in detail the income and expenditures for 1943. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. Allen & Company, 
Raleigh, N. C. Certified Public Accountants. 

November 1, 1943 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1943 



Cash 
Balance 
10-1-42 



Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 



Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 



Cash 
Balance 
9-30-43 



GENERAL FUND 
Receipts: 

From Churches — Undesignated. 

Disbursements: 

For General Fund Expenses 



STATE MISSIONS 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds 

Baptist Foundation 

Baptist Sunday School Board 

Churches for Rev. L. E. Ludlum's Salary.. 

Churches for David K. Shelton's Salary 

Gifts from Southern States for Oteen Sup- 
port 

Rent McCuller's Church 

Share of General Fund 

(1942 17 per cent; 1943 15 per cent) 
Total Receipts and Beginning cash 
Overdraft 



$ 44,093.66 



70,710.39 

473.00 

7,630.93 

243.00 

60.00 

757.47 

32.00 

80,287.40 



$18,126.49 



$ 160,194.19 



$ 44,093.66 



Annual of Session 1943 77 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-42 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-43 


Disbursements: 

Department of Christian Education in 
Schools: 






$ 12,938.55 
10,028.11 
10,827.43 

7,343.98 

1,669.74 

3,157.92 

2,073.00 

10,413.63 

23,263.64 

23,687.08 

1,780.76 
1,829.87 

1,065.37 

600.00 

2,311.48 
11,842.31 
1,536.27 
1,820.00 
7,113.40 
839.02 

934.83 




















Other State Missions Work: 
























































Miscellaneous: 
















Salaries Recording and Statistical Sec- 








Preparation Manuscript and History 








Contingent, Radio Hour, Camp Work, 
















































Subscriptions Biblical Recorder for 
















Total Disbursements and End- 


? 137,076.39 


$ 4,991.31 




$ 4,788.23 


$ 2,100.00 




MINISTERS' RELIEF FUND— SPECIAL 
Receipts: 


$ 25.00 














$ 6,863.23 




$ 1,057.76 


$ 701.83 
5,165.52 




EDUCATION MINISTERIAL AID 
Receipts: 


$ 3,692.50 




Designated Funds and from Baptist Foun- 
















Totals Receipts and Beginning Cash 


$ 1,057.76 


$ 5,867.35 








Disbursements: 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


$ 3,692.50 


$ 3,232.61 




3 8,061.88 


S 1,944.10 
135,496.34 

46,157.01 




EDUCATION CONVENTION DEBT 
Receipts: 
















(1942 35 per cent; 1943 23 per cent) 
Apportionment from Hundred Thousand 
Club . 












Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


$ 8,061.88 


$ 183,597.45 









78 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-42 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-43 


Disbursements: 

Borrowed Money Repaid Wachovia Bank 






3 123,000.00 

2,200.00 

750.00 

9,012.58 

208.50 

560.00 

65.00 

31,233.46 
15.00 




Paid on Mars Hill Note Payable 
















































Education Current Support October 1, 
1942 to December 31, 1942 








Gift to Mars Hill College.. 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 167,044.54 


3 24,614.79 






3 19,670.08 
25,827.47 




NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL FUND 
Receipts: 


3 19,744.29 

23,500.00 

2,213.68 

2,400.00 

938.00 












3 6,255.86 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 45,497.55 








Disbursements: 








Payments on Note — Wachovia Bank and 








Payments on Interest — Wachovia Bank 








Payments on Note — Security Life and 








Payments on Interest — Security Life and 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 48,795.97 


3 2,957.44 






3 10,330.99 




MINISTERS' RETIREMENT FUND 
Receipts: 


3 2,077.26 
5,843.03 
1,023.10 






3 2,434.23 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 10,330.99 








Disbursements: 

Salary, Office Expense, Equipment, Bond 
































Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 8,943.39 


3 3,821.83 






3 39,154.73 
65,000.00 




WAKE FOREST CHAPEL BUILDING 
FUND 
Receipts: 


? 4,051.11 
60,600.00 

50,000.00 
727.91 












3 3,807.60 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 104,154.73 








Disbursements: 

Salaries, Travel, House Rent, Printing, 
















Paid on Notes — Wachovia Bank and Trust 
Co 
























Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 115,379.02 


3 7,416.69 

















Annual of Session 1943 79 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-42 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-43 


AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
Receipts: 




3 424.09 


3 394.01 










Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


$ 


3 442.09 








Disbursements: 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


394.01 


3 30.08 






3 2,077.00 
52,679.58 




EDUCATION CURRENT SUPPORT 
Receipts: 


3 31,803.34 
1,815.14 












None 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 54,756.58 








Disbursements: 








Audits and Expenses Education, Commis- 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 33,618.48 


3 21,138.10 






3 95,627.81 

40,024.53 

113,514.51 

545.69 

206,619.76 




SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS FUND 
Receipts: 


3 200,759.51 

47,193.27 

46,157.01 
106,875.93 
39,969.22 

539.69 






























S26.912.77 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 456,332.30 








Disbursements: 








Paid on Designations Hundred Thousand 
Club 








Apportionment of Hundred Thousand Club 








Foreign Mission Designations and Expense- 
Home Missions Designations and Expense- 
Ministerial Relief Regular — Designations 




























Total Disbursements and Ending Bal- 


3 441,494.63 


3 37,836.32 










Due State Program from September 
Designations Hundred Thousand 




3 3,914.12 




335,191.84 


31,067,348.89 






GRAND TOTALS 


31,000,557.59 


3101,983.14 

















75. 



II. REPORT OF GENERAL BOARD MEETINGS 



Actions of the General Board in its meeting in January 1943 follow : 
1. The Board was organized with the election of J. Winston Pearce as 
President, E. Norfieet Gardner as Vice-President and C. B. Deane as Re- 
cording Secretary. 



80 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

2. O. L. Moore of Laurinburg was elected to membership on the Board 
to take the place of Aubrey L. Tomlinson, who had resigned his pastorate 
in Laurinburg to enter the armed service as a chaplain. 

3- New members of the Executive Committee were elected as follows : 
Claude F. Gaddy, M. L. Banister and E. N. Gardner. 

4. Concerning payment of the Victory Tax the following motion was 
adopted : 

"Due solely to the emergency which exists and the desire of 
all to cooperate with the government in such an emergency, the 
Board instructs its executive officers to comply with the request 
of the Federal government for the deduction of the Victory Tax 
from the amount which it pays to its employees ; 

Further, the Board suggests to the individual churches that 
they likewise comply with this request of the government. 

In doing so it is our distinct understanding that no principle in- 
volved in the complete separation of church and State is com- 
promised." 

5. The division of the 60% of the Undesignated Cooperative Program for 
the use of State objects was adopted as follows: 

State Missions 15% 

Hospital 5% 

Ministerial Education 1% 

Ministers' Retirement Fund 2% 

Education-Debt Service 23% 

Education-Current Support 14% 

Total 60% 

6. Concerning the Ministers' Retirement Plan the following actions were 
taken : 

"(a) Upon motion by Nane Starnes the Board recommended 
that the requirement of thirty-three and one-third years of service 
for those participating in the Ministers' Retirement Plan be re- 
duced to twenty-five years, and that the Executive Committee be 
empowered to make this change subject to the approval of the Re- 
lief and Annuity Board. 

"(b) The Board approved the payment of 4% for chaplains 
wishing to retain their membership in the Ministers' Retirement 
Plan while serving with the armed forces, the maximum for any 
one man not to exceed $100 annually. 

"It was also understood that any North Carolina minister 
who became a chaplain, and who was at that time not a member 
of the Plan, might enter the Plan on this basis of he so desired, 
with the further understanding that this arrangement would stand 
so long as he served as chaplain during the present conflict and 
for a period not to exceed six months after the cessation of hos- 
tilities. 

"(c) Adoption of the suggestion that a minimum of $1200, 
and a maximum of $2,000, be used during the year for the pro- 



Annual of Session 1943 81 

motion of the Ministers' Retirement Plan; that as many as three 
individuals in as many sections of the State be selected to give 
part time to this program." 

7. Concerning the action of the Convention in appropriating $5,000 to be 
used for the cause of sobriety and temperance, and in general against the use 
of alcoholic beverages, was considered, and upon motion the whole matter, 
including the employment of one or more workers in conjunction with other 
denominations, was referred to the Executive Committee. 

8. The following resolution was adopted : 

"Resolved that the Executive Committee of this General 
Board be and it is hereby authorized and instructed, if necessary, 
to borrow from time to time during the year 1943 from banks or 
individuals, the total sum not to exceed Seventy-Five Thousand 
Dollars ($75,000.00), and that any note, or notes, given for this 
purpose shall be signed by the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee and the General Secretary and Treasurer of the Conven- 
tion." 

9. Concerning appropriations for the educational institutions the following 
general principles were adopted : 

"(1) That the appropriations made last year to Wake Forest, 
Meredith, Mars Hill, Campbell and Wingate be increased by 20%. 

"(2) That on this basis an allocation now be made of only half 
of the amount, covering the first six months of the year. 

"(3) That the Education Committee and the Executive Com- 
mittee together be authorized to fix the appropriation for the last 
six months of the year, with due consideration of the needs of the 
institutions and of available funds. 

"(4) In determining the needs of the several institutions the 
Education Committee and the Executive Committee shall be guided 
by an auditor's report as of April 30. 

"(5) That all appropriations to Wingate be made upon the 
same conditions as that of last year; namely that the Convention 
funds be matched with a like amount raised by the college. 

"(6) That the appropriation to Chowan College shall be fixed 
at $331/3 per student." 

10. In the budget adopted the salaries of the employees of the General 
Board were raised in amounts varying from about 6% to about 15%, those 
receiving the lower salaries receiving the larger percentage of increase. 

11. On the whole the budget adopted for 1943 was based upon the income 
of the Convention for 1942. Some advances were made, and these will appear 
in the audit of the books at the end of the present calendar year. 

Actions of the Board in its meeting in June, 1943 follow : 

1. The Board took action looking toward the increase of aid to 
our ministerial students in the several schools, it being felt that 
the 1% of the Cooperative Program was not providing an amount 
sufficient for the purpose. 

2. It was voted to continue the appropriation so that North 



82 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Carolina might do her part in supporting the Southern Baptist 

Radio Hour. 

3. The report of the Executive Committee, to whom the matter 

of appropriations to the colleges was referred, was adopted as 

follows for the calendar year 1943 : 

Wake Forest $20,000 

Meredith 20,000 

Mars Hill 15,000 

Campbell 12,500 

Wingate 3,500 

It should here be stated that the appropriation to Wingate was on the 
condition that they send $3,500 to the Convention treasurer, and with the 
understanding that this amount be secured from individuals in such a way 
as to interfere in no wise with the gifts of the churches for the Cooperative 
Program. 

76. 

III. DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

A. HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 

During the twelve months period ending September 30, 1943, we have 
forwarded for all Southern Baptist Convention objects $395,337.62, a gain 
over the preceding year of $74,873.42. During a corresponding period ending 
September 30, 1942, the gain over the preceding year was $80,583.50. 

Undesignated funds for Southern Baptist Convention objects during 1943 
are divided as follows : 

Per Cent 

Foreign Mission Board 50 

Home Mission Board 23 1/3 

Relief and Annuity Board 10 1/3 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Baptist Bible Institute 4 1/5 

W. M. U. Training School 8/15 

American Baptist Theological Seminary 1 1/2 

Southern Baptist Hospital' 1 7/10 



100 



B. STATE MISSIONS 



In the introductory part of this report we called attention to two phases 
of State Mission work which have during the year received our careful atten- 
tion, namely, the work in the camp areas and the associational missionaries. 
We called attention also to the association-wide revivals, and these matters 
need not be repeated here. 

We record with gratitude the increased interest in State Missions mani- 
fested by the Woman's Missionary Union. The exact figures are not yet 
available, but the offering of the women made in September appears to be some 
thirty per cent greater than in 1942. They have given this year something 
of the same attention to the study of State Missions as they have formerly 



Annual of Session 1943 83 

given to the study of Home and Foreign Missions. It is believed that the 
eyes of many have been opened to the pressing needs here in North Carolina. 
It appears that our total income for State Missions this year will amount to 
at least $150,000. Even so our total expenditures are only a little above what 
they were fifteen years ago. 

1. General Missionaries 

We record here reports of the general missionaries. In doing so we pay 
tribute to the very devoted and effective service of Douglas M. Branch, who 
served as general missionary from March 1, 1942 to September 12, 1943. The 
service of Brother Branch was not long, but it was extremely valuable. To 
the work he brought a strong body, a keen mind and a warm heart. He held 
many meetings in individual churches, and while with the Board was respon- 
sible for organizing association-wide revivals in many associations. Without 
adopting a formal resolution, the Board here records with deep gratitude its 
appreciation of Mr. Branch as a Christian gentleman and a conscientious 
worker. He left the work of the Board to enter the Southern Baptist Theologi- 
cal Seminary in Louisville, where he hopes to remain for perhaps three years. 
At the completion of his work there it is our hope that he will return to a 
large opportunity in North Carolina. 

With genuine delight the Board announces the election of E. L. Spivey 
as general missionary in Piedmont Carolina. He began work with the Board 
on September 1. To this task he brings training of a very high order, having 
attended Wake Forest College and having received his doctor of theology 
degree from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is now forty-two 
years of age, in excellent health, and is thoroughly prepared in body, mind 
and spirit for the great task ahead of him. He is to make his home in 
Charlotte, from which point he can reach all parts of Piedmont Carolina 
very easily. Pastors and churches will be fortunate if they can secure his 
services either in stewardship revivals or in evangelistic meetings. 

The reports of the general missionaries follow : 

(a) Report of M. O. Alexander 

Permit me, please, to change the form of this brief report, which is given 
each year. Heretofore I have given a detailed statement of my work as to 
time, place and type of work undertaken. I will presume that you will know 
that I, along with your other servants of the Convention, have been busy. 

After nine years among our Baptist people in all parts of North Carolina 
touching every phase of their lives and activities as Baptists, I am prepared 
to sing their praise and to pronounce them a great and noble throng. I am 
thinking of the tremendous possibilities along with grave responsibilities that 
are at our very door as Baptists. 

We have more than half a million members of our churches, and that 
great army led only 19,000 to open confession of faith and through the 
baptismal waters last year out of a possible 600,000 in our State. The fact 
is that not more than two-fifths of our Baptist people are enlisted. We have 
around 300,000 members who are almost wholly indifferent to our Kingdom 
program. I honestly believe that these good people lack only one thing, and 
that is specific information with reference to our Christian way of life, the 
meaning of Christian Discipleship and Christian Stewardship. Our government 
looks with positive favor upon thorough training for each soldier, and we 



84 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

should be pleased with nothing less for our men in our armies. Can we expect 
our Baptist army to function well and win great victories for our God if they 
are not trained? I call to your attention again, as I have done for the past 
five or six years, to the last verse of the Gospel of Matthew; "Teaching 
Them," after baptism, training those whom we enlist as Disciples of Jesus. 
Our churches welcome help from any source, the calls are many, the needs 
are great, but prepared laborers are few indeed. 

Our needs in the State call for the strongest and most thoroughly trained 
leaders that can be found to train (teach) 300,000 saved ones, who are anxious 
and willing to serve our God, and by His grace to reach the thousands who 
are unsaved. There is no end to our possibilities, and no way to estimate the 
seriousness of our responsibilities. "To him that knoweth to do good and 
doeth it not, to him it is sin." 

I give thanks to God for North Carolina Baptists, and pray to Him that 
we may arise in His strength without delay to do His will and work here 
and now. 

(b) Report of D. M. Branch 

1. I arranged for and led in six association-wide simultaneous revival cam- 
paigns. In some respects all of these movements were successful; some, of 
course, were more effective than others. In general I will say that in every 
association where we had anything like fair cooperation from pastors and 
churches these efforts were gloriously blessed of the Lord in at least four 
ways: (1) in strengthening the churches; (2) in deepening the understanding 
and fellowship of the ministers participating and assisting; (3) in strengthen- 
ing the bond between the churches and the convention and its agencies ; (4) in 
reaching the lost for Christ. 

2. I preached in fifteen revival meetings in churches, these running from 
one to two weeks, and held two evangelistic meetings in mission points. In 
these revivals there were in the neighborhood of one hundred and fifty pro- 
fessions of faith, and in addition many were added to the churches by letter 
and statement. All of those who made professions, except about three, joined 
the Baptist churches where they made the profession. 

3. I taught one mission study course in a W. M. S. 

4. One week was spent in the pastor's school held at Gardner- Webb College, 
during which time I rendered what service it was possible for me to render 
the meeting as a general missionary. 

5. During the year I supplied several pulpits, made several special addresses, 
and sought in every possible way to promote all the agencies of the convention, 
including the Biblical Recorder. 

On September 12, 1943 I severed my relation with the State Mission Board, 
having worked as general missionary for approximately 19 months. I am 
grateful to God for having had this privilege of serving North Carolina 
Baptists in the promotion of the Kingdom of God. The relation I now sever 
has been one of great benefit to me, and the only reason for discontinuing this 
connection is that I feel keenly the need for further training. We go imme- 
diately to the Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville. 

In closing let me plead for whole-hearted and sincere cooperation on the 
part of North Carolina pastors and churches with our Baptist State Conven- 
tion and all its agencies. The devil would like nothing better than to engender 



Annual of Session 1943 85 

suspicion and division among our Baptist ranks in North Carolina. I would 
testify with all the sincerity of my soul that it has never been my privilege 
to work with a more sincere, humble, and devout group of Christians than 
those who work as the servants of Christ and North Carolina Baptists. Brother 
E. L. Spivey takes over the work I have tried for these months to do. He has 
been led of the Lord to this work, a work he is far better qualified, from the 
standpoint of training and experience, to do than I. I plead with all our 
Baptist host in our beloved State to give him ready acceptance and unfailing 
cooperation. 

We covet the prayers of our host of friends in North Carolina, and we hope, 
by God's grace, to return to our own beloved State to serve Him more 
effectively when this period of training is done. 

(c) Report of J. C. Pipes 

Below is a brief summary of my work as General Missionary of the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina from October 1, 1942, through 
September 30, 1943: 

Attended ten annual associational meetings in the interest of 
our general work. 

Held seven revival meetings of ten days each. 

Conducted ten one-day pastors' conferences and attended a 
large number of regular monthly pastors' conferences. 

Conducted two simultaneous evangelistic meetings. 

Supplied for a period of two months every other Sunday 
morning in a country church. 

Conducted seven one-week preachers' revivals. 

Held during the year eleven one-week stewardship revivals in 
individual churches. 

Attended two weeks preachers' schools (Mars Hill and Gard- 
ner-Webb ) . 

Worked for two weeks in a church visitation program in the 
Haywood Association. 

In all this week I have been encouraged by the progress our churches are 
making. It seems to me there is a fine spirit of cooperation and a greater 
desire to learn and do the Master's will. In all of our evangelistic efforts it 
seems to me there is a greater spirit of evangelism and more warmth and 
more passion for the lost than there has been in a number of years. In the 
revivals I have directed and held there has been more than five hundred 
additions to the churches. In these efforts we have sent in more than four 
hundred new subscriptions to the Biblical Recorder. The free will offerings 
in the meetings have paid expenses. All told, we believe we have had one of 
the best years in the work that we have had since going with the Convention. 

As we look forward to the coming year before us we do so with hope 
and confidence that if true to Him and to the trust He has committed to us 
we shall have His abiding presence and leadership and we can be assured 
that our labors are not in vain in the Lord. 



86 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

77. 

2. Missionary Pastoral Assistance 

We give below a summary of the work done by our missionary pastors 
from October 1, 1942 through September 30, 1943: 

Number of Missionary Pastors 70 

Number of churches aided 121 

Sermons 9,746 

Other addresses 2,303 

Revivals held 174 

Training Classes conducted 74 

Visits made 22,143 

Conversions 1,482 

Baptisms 1,225 

Additions other than by Baptism 916 

Churches repaired or being built 33 

Subscriptions secured to Charity and Children 295 

Subscriptions secured to Biblical Recorder 500 

Subscriptions secured to Mission Magazines 373 

The following amounts were reported as gifts made by churches during 
the period : 

Building and Repair $38,431 

Pastors' salaries 50,521 

Undesignated Cooperative Program 8,976 

State Missions 2,070 

Home Missions 528 

Foreign Missions 2,188 

Heck Memorial 90 

Education 631 

Hundred Thousand Club 1,897 

Orphanage 5,550 

Aid in Evangelistic Meetings 1,701 

Hospital 1,185 

W. M. U. Training School 15 

Local Charity, etc 685 

Temperance 39 

Ministers' Retirement and Old Ministers' Relief 159 

78. 

3. Church Extension 

The Board has numerous calls for help on buildings from all over the 
State. In most cases the Board has not been able to meet these requests. Except 
in most unusual cases help on buildings has been confined to the war areas 
where buildings were urgently needed, and where churches had to be organized 
and the work started. The Convention had to take the lead in such instances, 
or nothing could have been done in most cases. The Convention has followed 
its policy of buying choice lots in growing residential sections and holding 
them until such time as it seemed wise to organize churches. The Board could 
spend profitably fifty to one hundred thousand dollars in all sections of the 
State in aiding poorly located churches in the country to abandon their old 



Annual of Session 1943 87 

buildings located far away from the highways and relocate on the highways 
where they would be more accessible to the membership. We are happy to 
announce that some progress has been made in this direction. Only a lack of 
funds prevents the doing of the thing we know ought to be done. 

We give below a statement of funds expended from November 1, 1942 
through October 31, 1943: 

Church Association Amount 

Boone Three Forks $1,500.00 

Cullowhee Tuckaseigee 404.67 

Aurora Roanoke 150.00 

Pullen Memorial Raleigh 5,000.00 

Sunset Park Wilmington 7,879.27 

Carolina Beach Wilmington 2,415.94 

Jacksonville Wilmington 147.62 

Oteen Buncombe 300.00 

Cary Street Mission Central 250.00 

Enka Buncombe 750.00 

West Greensboro Piedmont 750.00 

Calvary Raleigh 562.52 

Shady Brook Cabarrus 700.00 

Fairfield Chowan 146.69 

Topton Western North Carolina . . . 100.00 

Fairview Gaston 400.00 

Newman's Chapel Macon 300.00 

Soldier Bay Dock 300.00 

Lakewood Mount Zion 500.00 

West Burlington Mount Zion 1,750.00 

Gold Mine Macon 100.00 

Macedonia Transylvania 55.00 

West Franklin Street Gaston 300.00 

Mount Olive Ashe , 100.00 

Bethel Kings Mountain 500.00 

79. 

4. Work Among the Indians 

Rev. and Mrs. P. A. Underwood continue their work among the Indians in 
Robeson County. A year or two ago the Indians themselves erected a small 
home at Pembroke for orphan children. The Board is happy that Mr. and Mrs. 
Underwood have been able to have some part in carrying on that work. 
Recently the Woman's Missionary Union appropriated $500 for the orphans' 
home there, and just a few days ago Mr. Underwood wrote that the Indians 
had raised a like amount to match the gift. A brief report from Mr. and Mrs. 
Underwood of the work for the year ending September 30, 1943 follows : 

We have been among the Indians of Robeson County in the 
Burnt Swamp Association for a little over one year. We have 
been encouraged with the progress made in many phases of the 
work. I shall briefly state some of these. 

Each of the twenty-five churches of the Burnt Swamp Associa- 
tion have Sunday Schools and for the most part they are well at- 
tended. Many of these Sunday Schools have had training classes 



88 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

and as a result they have been graded and enlarged. An Associa- 
tional Sunday School Convention meets regularly once a month 
with department conferences under the leadership of J. L. Carter. 
There are eight B. T. U. organizations, two of which have been 
organized during the last year. Each one of these has at least 
four units in it. A B. T. U. Convention has been organized to meet 
once a quarter. 

Evangelism has been very much stressed throughout the year. 
Religious Emphasis Week in the College was observed with nearly 
one hundred professions. Youth Revivals, the B. S. U. Retreat, 
the Associational Camp Week, D. V. B. S's and Study Courses 
all have been the means of fifty or more consecrations. In addition 
to these efforts the pastors have all had one week meetings and 
some have had two. They report about two hundred professions 
and consecrations. 

This has been a year of great improvements in buildings. Three 
new church buildings have been completed during the year : Beulah, 
Mt. Elim and Zion Hill. Many of the old buildings have been painted 
and the grounds made more attractive. Two churches have added 
Sunday School rooms. Cedar Grove wanted to erect a modern 
brick building, but was denied a permit for the duration. 

The W. M. U. has had a great year in the advancement of all 
phases of its work. Mission Study, training courses, new organiza- 
tions, camp work and contributions for all worthy objects have 
been stressed. 

A Pastors' Conference was organized nearly a year ago. It 
meets monthly. Subjects of timely interest are arranged for dis- 
cussion. The pastors seem to enjoy this meeting very much and 
always look forward with interest to the next meeting. A train- 
ing school for our pastors was held the last week in May. Rev. 
E. S. Summers was with us and led the pastors in a fine way. 

Total collections for the year : 

For local church use $13,945.42 

For local orphanage 3,259.80 

For missions (all phases) , 718.68 

For Hospital (Winston- Salem) 1,083.57 

Grand total $19,007.47 

80. 

5. Cooperative Work with the General Baptist State Convention 

Rev. C. E. Griffin continues as General Secretary of the Negro Baptist 
Convention in the State. His growing conception and grasp of the work has 
been a source of much joy to the Board. The same may be said also of his 
associate, Rev. J. F. Wertz, who became Sunday School and Training Union 
Secretary when J. H. Clanton left the work to enter the chaplaincy. Recently 
Brother Clanton visited the offices of the General Board, and it was noted 
that in addition to wearing the cross as a chaplain he had the bars of a 
captain on his shoulders. 



Annual of Session 1943 89 

We enter here the report of the work for the year ending September 30, 
1943 as presented by Secretaries Griffin and Wertz : 

The following is a resume of the activities of our office during the past 
twelve months— October 1, 1942 to September 30, 1943 : 

A. Report of activities of Brother T- F. Wertz, Director of Religious Edu- 
cation and Training: 

Bodies visited 11 

Sermons preached 90 

Lectures delivered 126 

Letters sent out 663 

Teacher Training Courses 93 

Vacation Bible Schools 11 

Miles traveled 1 1,142 

Ministers Institutes 19 

Leaders for Institutes 3 

Conferences 22 

Amount spent traveling $334.26 

B. Report of activities of Brother C. E. Griffin, Executive Secretary: 

Sermons preached 133 

Lectures delivered 157 

Ministers visited 565 

Miles traveled 19,642 

Number of letters sent out 8,763 

Amount spent traveling $334.26 

It is with a peculiar joy that I am able to report the activities of our work 
for the year just ending, 1942-43. May I hasten to state that the year has 
been marked with unusual and significant developments, developments that 
definitely indicate that our people are more and more realizing their respon- 
sibility to the conventional work. 

I can report without fear of contradiction that the spirit of cooperation, 
sacrifice, and service among our people is more apparent now than in any 
period in the history of our convention. Not only is this true among our 
people in general, but it is true among all of the departments of our Convention. 
Harmony seems to be the rule. We thank Our Father for His guidance in 
all of these unusual developments for surely they have been most significant. 

The most significant, perhaps, is the very fine response received from our 
people to the Conventional program, especially to the Five Year Plan to realize 
$70,000 a year for our Conventional objectives. As a result, the report 
just received from our Foreign Mission Board indicates that North Carolina 
Baptists gave more for Foreign Missions this year just closed, September 
30, than we have ever given in the history of the convention. The amount for 
Foreign Missions alone for this period is approximately $11,000. I am sure 
our other objectives realized a similar success. I give this example because 
it is the only report we have received for our Annual as yet. 

Another meaningful development noted this year is the work our modera- 
tors are doing through their associations and what our larger city units 
are doing through their churches. The moderators, themselves, are taking 
the lead in recruiting every church in their bounds for greater service to our 



90 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Baptist work. Every association is striving to have periods of training and 
periods of conventional activities during the year leading up to their annual 
sessions. This has brought fruitful results. In our larger cities the Baptist 
Churches are constantly coming together for the same purposes. Here they 
fostered a week or more of training and conventional activities. As an out- 
standing example, I have already reported the Wilmington move. Here was 
featured a special State Convention Day. Dr. S. L. Blanton was one of the 
speakers. Similar features were conducted in Charlotte, Greensboro, and 
especially Winston-Salem, where some phase of our conventional work was 
stressed each week leading up to a fifth Sunday. Other similar features were 
held throughout the state. 

Still another outstanding event for the year was the Annual Ministers Con- 
ference and Institute. Each year it is part of our program to cooperate with 
Shaw University in holding an Annual Ministers Conference and Institute 
combined with the Woman's Missionary Conference, the Sunday School and 
Baptist Training Union Training Conference. This year it was held at Shaw 
University, from June 14th to June 18th. This Conference was recorded as 
the best and as the most successful in our history. Approximately 500 were 
in attendance. There were 13 Ministers Institutes held this year in various 
parts of the state. Over 400 ministers were in attendance upon these Insti- 
tutes. 

As mentioned in the beginning of my report, we are having unusual 
developments in our work. To my mind there are three definite causes for 
this very unusual success. These may be recorded briefly : 

Our Baptist Headquarters — The departments of our convention 
have been drawn closer together and hence are better prepared to 
work more harmoniously together. North Carolina Baptists look 
with pride to their Headquarters. It gives them inspiration as 
well as motivation. 

Next, Our Manual, a book for use in the Churches entitled, 
"Working Among Negro Baptist in North Carolina." For the first 
time in our history a manual was compiled setting forth funda- 
mental Baptist principles as well as the entire program of our 
work as Baptist in North Carolina. I am able to say that this little 
manual has brought inestimable results. The demand was so great 
we have been authorized by our Board to increase the number for 
next year as the supply for this year has long been exhausted. 
Only reference copies remain. 

Last, but not the least, the third cause for our continued suc- 
cess is surely found in the fact of the constant, and, I hope, ever 
abiding, spirit of cooperation existing between our friends — all of 
them, of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and us. 
This spirit of cooperation cannot be estimated in terms of dollars 
and cents for it is far deeper and more significant than that. Per- 
sonally, I have received untold value in the contacts made at your 
annual conventions as well as contacts made throughout the year 
over the state in various ways. For instance, the service rendered 
by Mr. Morgan and the other workers at our State Sunday School 
and Baptist Training Union Conventions in High- Point this year 
is beyond value. Our people believe in the leadership of the 



81. 



Annual of Session 1943 91 

Baptist State Convention. May Our Heavenly Father continue 
to bless this relationship. The Negro Baptist of North Carolina 
join me in giving thanks for your support to our work. 



6. Oteen Mission 



When the words "Oteen Mission" are mentioned one immediately thinks 
of Wayne Williams, who gave many years of distinguished service to the 
work there. It will be recalled that he left Oteen, being succeeded for a time 
by Wyman Wood and later by Ottis Hagler, to become a chaplain in the army. 
Because of his long service he soon attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
About a year ago his health began to fail. With joy we record his great 
service, but with sorrow we record the fact of his illness. 

In that important work Ottis Hagler carries on, not merely as Baptist 
chaplain but as Protestant chaplain. We present a brief report of his year's 
work there : 

During the past twelve months the Chaplain at Oteen has been busy 
giving his full time to a pastoral and preaching ministry to those who have 
come seeking health. Under new status as Official Protestant Post Chaplain 
we have been supported by the Veterans Administration, the cooperating Bap- 
tist Churches of Buncombe County, the North Carolina State Mission Board, 
and the various mission agencies of the South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, 
Alabama, and Tennessee Conventions. It is hoped that other states with a 
number of patients at Oteen will soon share in the enterprise. 

We have been busy conducting regular worship services in the Red Cross 
Chapel for ambulatory patients. This service is broadcast to the 21 wards 
for bed patients. A weekly Bible Class is taught. During the week days we 
have maintained a program of daily visitation to the Receiving and Surgery 
Wards. Devotional literature, Bibles, Testaments, and tracts, have been dis- 
tributed by the hundreds and thousands. Now and again we are called upon 
for counselling. We conduct funerals for local patients and occasionally make 
a trip to the home town of some veteran for this last service. 

We have conducted 1,083 initial interviews on the Receiving Wards, made 
5,000 or more routine patient contacts, answered more than 100 special calls 
from the "seriously and critically ill." For this purpose we have been on 24 
hour call all during the year. 

At present we have a complement of 700 patients ; 1,083 having been 
received and 1,181 discharged during the year. 200 young men of World 
War II are now at Oteen. A like number have come and gone — cases pro- 
nounced arrested, against medical advice, or AWOL. All branches of the 
armed services of three Wars are represented here. Soldier, sailor, marine, 
Army and Navy nurse, and WAC are here. Under a system of reciprocity 
we have one sailor each from the English, Royal Dutch, and Fighting French 
Navies. The Chaplain is responsible also for more than 100 negro patients. 

The capacity of this facility is now 1,100 beds but due to extensive remodel- 
ing for further expansion now under way we cannot at present care for 
this number. By January 1, 1945 it is expected that we will be hospitalizing 
a full capacity of 1,800 to 2,000 individuals. 

The Baptist S. S. Board, the publishing houses of the Methodist and Pres- 
byterian denominations, the American Bible Society, and the Moody Colportage 



92 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Division of Moody Bible Institute have been generous in supplying an abun- 
dance of literature, Bibles, Testaments, and tracts. Our gratitude for this is 
unbounded. 

Pastors and families of men or women coming to Oteen can be of help 
in our work by notifying the Chaplain in advance. It is wonderful to be 
able to say to a patient "Your pastor wrote about you, I've been expecting 
you" or "Friends from your home town wrote and asked me to meet you." 
Above all, pray for these who have given their health in defense of country 
and pray for the Chaplain as he ministers to them. 

82. 

7. Sanatoriums 

We present also brief reports from Pastor E. M. Harris of Aberdeen, who 
continues his work with the sick at the State Sanatorium and with the girls 
at Samarcand ; also a brief statement from J. N. Watson of Black Mountain 
in connection with his work at the Western North Carolina Sanatorium there : 

(a) Aberdeen 

The North Carolina Sanatorium is not unmindful of the religious needs of 
its patients and the value of religious instruction and public worship. For 
those who are up, there is a public preaching service every Sunday in the 
chapel conducted by the pastors of near by towns. These pastors are avail- 
able for prayer meetings, personal visits and counseling. Sunday school every 
Sunday conducted by an able corps of teachers from the Sanatorium. The 
public worship services are well attended, and as a rule, much appreciated by 
the patients who are physically able to come. I would say that the response 
to all religious activities is encouraging. There are about 650 patients. In 
our visits we find a large percentage reading their Bibles. Church bulletins 
are greatly appreciated and any remembrances from their home church are 
prized and cherished. 

(b) Western North Carolina 

This year has been a most pleasant and profitable year at the Sanatorium. 
We have been able to visit rather regularly during the year. The patients, 
Doctors, and the nurses have been most cordial in their response. Dr. 
Bittinger, the Superintendent, has welcomed our work most graciously. There 
are 282 patients in the institution today, Oct. 20, 1943. Of that number, 149 
are Baptists, 104 belong to other churches, and 29 make no profession of faith 
in our Lord Jesus Christ. This affords a great opportunity to do the work 
of a pastor, the work of an evangelist, and the work of a missionary. We visit 
the institution to bring cheer to those that are down-hearted, to rejoice with 
those that are getting well, and to tell those who are lost about our Saviour. 
We are privileged to preach to the patients one time each month. Those who 
are able come to the chapel ; those who are not able can listen over the exten- 
sion system that carries the message to them. 

Perhaps I can best tell you about the work by telling you about a visit 
there. The visit I made this morning will serve : I visited about one hundred 
patients. I found joy, happiness, hope, despondency, sorrow, and disappoint- 
ment. Several patients had moved to the first floor. This meant that they 
were getting well and would soon, under normal condition, be going home. It 



Annual of Session 1943 93 

is needless to say that they were rejoicing and wanted me to know about their 
success. I went into one room and found a man who had lost his mother since 
I was there last. This called for a word of comfort and a word of prayer 
to the Father for him. This not only helped the man, but I find that it helps 
me as well. A mother had received word from the War Department that 
her son had been seriously wounded; this called for a word of faith and hope 
and a prayer to the Father for his recovery. New patients had come in since 
I was there. One man was a Methodist, another was a Lutheran, another 
was a Baptist, and still another was a non-christian. To each of these patients 
I tried to say something that would help them get adjusted in their new sur- 
roundings, and to the non-christian, I urged upon him the necessity of trust- 
ing Christ as his Saviour. Several months ago, a pastor wrote me about a man 
there. This man was not a Christian. I made contact with the man, and 
have been interested in him since. I saw him this morning and spoke to him 
about trusting Christ. 

The work offers a wonderful opportunity to do the real work of a pastor. 
May I urge you to remember the work in your prayers. Pray for the patients ; 
write to the ones that leave your church and community; come to see the 
patients. Remember the patients on special occasions. Many of them have 
been there for years — yes years. They need your help and prayers. Will 
you help? 

The Baptist Sunday School Board furnishes the Sunday School literature 
that is used in the Baptist work. Mr. Irvin Page, a deacon of the First 
Baptist Church in Black Mountain, N. C, has charge of the religious work 
and he is doing a good job of it. We deeply appreciate him, not only as a 
deacon, but as a co-laborer in our work at the Institution. We are grateful 
to the Superintendent, the doctors, and the nurses for the fine spirit of co- 
operation. They have been most grateful and helpful in their attitude. I feel 
sure that I speak the spirit of the patients, when I say, Thank you, to the 
State Convention for making this ministry possible. Keep some one at the 
Sanatorium ! 

83. 

8. Samarcand 

The buildings and campus at Samarcand cover about twenty acres. There 
are seven cottages well located, a large administration building, infirmary, edu- 
cational building, a good chapel, superintendent's residence, a cannery and all 
necessary dairy, barn, and out-buildings. Preaching services are held in the 
chapel every Sunday by pastors of different denominations. There is no 
church organization, but girls are permitted to unite with the church of their 
choice when they are converted and wish to unite with a church. We have 
received upon a profession of faith and baptism this year twenty-four. To 
these we have given certificates of baptism and New Testaments, and when 
they go home, or homes are provided for them, they will be given church 
letters and pastors in the town to which they go will be notified. The future 
of many a girl depends largely upon the reception she received when she 
arrives at what is to be her home. 



94 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

84. 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

We divide this report on Christian Education into two divisions : A. Chris- 
tian Education in the Churches, B. Christian Education in the Colleges. 

A. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE CHURCHES 

John E. Lawrence who left the work as B. S. U. Secretary in May, 1942, 
continues in the Navy, having now attained the rank of Lieutenant (jg). 
As is well known, he was succeeded in the work by Richard T. Howerton, Jr., 
who continues as State Student Secretary. 

Miss Cleo Mitchell has completed her work at Yale Divinity School, 
where she was on leave of absence, and is now Student Secretary and Per- 
sonnel Director at Meredith College. She is giving special attention to 
selecting and training young ladies for work in the churches as church secre- 
taries and as associational workers. 

Miss Laura Bateman, who succeeded Miss Mitchell at W. C. U. N. C. in 
Greensboro, was married to John Lawrence in June of this year. While 
Lieutenant Lawrence is away she will devote a part of her time to the 
work in Greensboro. 

In June of this year the General Board called Rev. James P. Westberry, 
of Bamberg, South Carolina, to become Secretary of the Department of 
Christian Education. After much thought Mr. Westberry felt led to decline 
the call, feeling that he should remain in the pastorate. No further steps 
have been taken to fill this place, which was so ably filled for a period 
of time by W. Perry Crouch. 

It is with a deep sense of loss that we record the resignation of Nathan 
C. Brooks, Jr. as State Training Union Secretary. North Carolina Baptists, 
the Board believes, have never had a more devoted servant than Nathan 
Brooks. To those of the Convention staff he was a great source of inspira- 
tion. His courage and faith during his long period of illness was little short 
of a benediction to his associates. He really has the shepherd's heart, and in 
response to this urge he resigned the work to become pastor of the church 
in Waynesboro, Georgia. In its June meeting the General Board passed the 
following resolution : 

"Whereas Rev. Nathan C. Brooks, Jr., has resigned as Train- 
ing Union Secretary of the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina to return to the pastorate, having already assumed the 
pastorate of the First Baptist Church of Waynesboro, Georgia, 
and 

Whereas he served us unselfishly and effectively in this posi- 
tion from January 1, 1937 to June 1, 1943, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the General Board 
of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina express to Mr. 
Brooks our heartfelt appreciation for these years of distinguished 
service. We know him to be a Christian gentleman of deep 
devotion and of the highest ideals. Moreover, we make record 
here of his vigorous and robust faith, which has been an in- 
spiration to all of us. 



Annual of Session 1943 95 

Be It Also Resolved that our prayers and most cordial good 
wishes shall follow him as he returns to the pastorate to become 
the shepherd of souls. 

We would also extend our deep appreciation to Mrs. Brooks, 
who through time of trial has likewise stood by with unfaltering 
faith. 

Be It Resolved Further that this resolution form a part of 
the report of the General Board to the Baptist State Convention." 

To take his place the Executive Committee, acting for the Board, has 
called to this important office W. Wilbur Hutchins, who began his work 
with the Convention October 1, coming to the work from the pastorate of 
the Southside Church in Winston-Salem. He brings to this task personal 
gifts of a very high order, a keen, well-trained mind, a warm heart, and an 
appreciation of the opportunities which the position affords. The Board 
feels that the churches, and in particular the young people, are to be con- 
gratulated because of his decision to accept the invitation of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. L. L. Morgan, along with Mr. and Mrs. John B. Lane as field workers, 
continues his effective work in the Sunday School Division. 

Reports from the various divisions follow : 

85. 

1. Division of Sunday Schools 
L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

As we review the work of the past year, we are conscious that God has 
been good, and that our people have been kind and cooperative in all our 
work. We have had to face many difficulties, brought about by the war, but 
they have only been a challenge for many of our people to do greater things 
for Christ. Now, as never before, we need to go forward with faith and 
vigor in the promotion of Bible teaching in the Sunday School and Vacation 
Bible School. With more than a million prospects in North Carolina for our 
Baptist Sunday Schools, we must not let up anywhere, but quicken our efforts 
everywhere. 

We express sincere appreciation for our associates in the work who have 
rendered excellent service throughout the year : Mr. and Mrs. John B. Lane, 
field workers ; Miss Bessie Morgan and Mrs. Ben T. Holden, office secre- 
taries ; our approved and qualified workers, Mrs. L. R. O'Brian, Mrs. C. R. 
Hinton, Mrs. J. P. Davis, Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. F. A. Bower, Mrs. Clyde 
E. Baucom and Mrs. Ford A. Burns. We would express appreciation for the 
sympathetic council of our General Secretary, Mr. M. A. Huggins, the generous 
and liberal attitude of Dr. T. L. Holcomb and his associates at the Sunday 
School Board in Nashville, to Dr. L. L. Carpenter, Editor of the Biblical 
Recorder, for space in our Baptist paper, and for the efficient help he has 
rendered on the field during the year. 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

1. State Sunday School Convention: 

Our Convention was held at the First Baptist Church, Greensboro, Febru- 
ary 26, 27 and 28, with an attendance of more than eight hundred. The 



96 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

speakers and conference leaders were at their best and our people were 
greatly helped. Dr. Harold W. Tribble, Dr. Sankey L. Blanton, Dr. O. T. 
Binkley, Mr. M. A. Huggins, and Dr. L. L. Carpenter were some of the 
feature speakers. Mr. J. N. Barnette, Mr. W. P. Phillips, Mr. Sibley Burnette, 
Mr. A. V. Washburn, Mr. Herman King, Miss Mary Virginia Lee, Miss 
Blanch Linthicum, Miss Allene Bryan, Miss Pauline Hargis, Miss Blossom 
Thompson, and Miss Frances Fraser were all with us to lead our con- 
ferences. 

2. Associational Conferences: 

During the week of March 29-April 2 the Sunday School Board forces 
joined us in an effort to hold an associational leadership conference in each 
of our seventy-one associations. We succeeded in getting into most of the 
associations and much good was accomplished. 

3. Ridgecrest Assembly: 

During the week of July 7-14 a great many of our associational officers 
attended the associational officers' conference at Ridgecrest. It was a great 
inspiration for them to meet and exchange ideas with leaders from all over 
the South. Many goals were set and new resolves made for better work. The 
following week, July 14-21, the regular Southwide Conference was held for 
officers and teachers. This was a great week and hundreds of our leaders 
took advantage of the fine program. They came in such great numbers that 
plans are now on foot to have two conferences for this group next year. 

4. Enlargement Campaigns: 

In the midst of war conditions we went ahead with our weeks of Sunday 
School Revival work in the churches. The chart on page 97 shows some 
of the results of our efforts. We used some of our best workers and the 
people responded in a very fine way. We ask that you join us in expressing 
sincere thanks to those who assisted us : J. W. Allen, Esther Adams, Mrs. 
C. D. Bain, Blanch Banks, Ethel Brown, Mrs. Ford A. Burns, Mrs. N. C. 
Brooks, Rev. Willard Brown, Margaret Jane Childs, Rev. Gilmer Cross, Mrs. 
J. P. Davis, Mary Lee Ernest, Lois Edinger, Ella Sue Gravitt, Vivian Grant, 
Albertina Hare, Evelyn Hampton, Mrs. C. R. Hinton, Alice Justice, Madge 
Lewis, Rev. Lewis Ludlum, Rev. Thomas Lawrence, John Lane, Mrs. John 
Lane, Willene Manes, Myra Motley, Mrs. L. R. O'Brian, Howard Olive, Alma 
Pearce, Margaret Sparks, Texie Sowers, Mrs. Charles Stephenson, Pearl 
York and W. F. West, Jr. 

5. Vacation Bible Schools: 

More and more our people are realizing the value of the Vacation Bible 
School. The lack of transportation has been a great handicap, but our people 
have gone on in the face of difficulties and we have a good record this year. 
So far we have received 504 reports and others will be coming in. We 
wish to thank the following associational workers for their contribution in this 
fine work : Miss Ruth Keller, Caldwell ; Miss Madge Lewis, Haywood ; Miss 
Zula Rogers, Little River; Miss Ruby Williams, Mount Zion; Miss Willa 
Marks, Surry; Miss Evelyn Stewart, Transylvania; Miss Gretchen Johnson, 
Tuckaseigee; Miss Vivian Grant, Wilmington; Miss Laura Mae Hilliard, 
Yancey ; and Rev. Tom Lawrence, Pilot Mountain. 



Annual of Session 1943 



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98 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

6. Training Awards: 

Since the new Training Course started October 1, 1934, we have issued in 
North Carolina 89,795 book awards. This gives us 7,719 awards for this year. 
In addition to this we have had issued in North Carolina since 1934, 2,405 
Diplomas, 796 Red Seals, 318 Blue Seals, 186 Gold Seals, and 35 Post Gradu- 
ate Diplomas. These awards have been issued to 42,103 different individuals. 

Looking Ahead: 

(1) Our State Sunday School Convention will be held in the First Baptist 
Church, High Point, February 1, 2, 3, 1944. We hope to reach 1,500 people 
for this great feast of good things. 

(2) During the first week in April the Sunday School Board forces will 
join us in conducting one or two associational officers conferences in prepara- 
tion for meetings to be held in all the associations immediately following these 
training conferences. 

(3) The week of June 28-July 4 we plan to have forty associational Super- 
intendents at Ridgecrest for the Associational Officers Conference. 

(4) July 5-11 and July 12-18 will be Southwide Sunday School weeks 
at Ridgecrest. We plan to have 800 people present during the two weeks. 

(5) We plan to use a large group of students and school teachers for field 
work during the summer of 1944, to conduct Sunday School Revivals, Study 
Courses and Vacation Bible Schools. 

6. Our Goal for 1944: 

1. Teacher Training in 1,000 churches. 

2. Ten Thousand Training Awards. 

3. Six weeks of simultaneous Sunday School Revival work. 

4. Special emphasis upon local training during April and October. 

5. Seventy-five Standard Sunday Schools. 

6. Special emphasis upon Denominational days in the Sunday School. 

7. An increase in Sunday School Enrollment even in a time like this. 

8. Emphasis upon teaching for Christian Living. 

9. Seven hundred Vacation Bible Schools. 

In this tragic hour of world suffering and need, may God give to North 
Carolina Baptists a clear understanding of the spiritual needs of the State 
and the world. The magnitude and the urgency of the Sunday School task 
are overwhelming. Let us join hands, hearts and prayers as we go forward 
in the name of Christ. 

86. 

2. Training Union Division 

W. Wilbur Hutchins, Secretary 

PERSONNEL 

On June 1, 1943, the Reverend Nathan C. Brooks, Jr., who for the past 
seven years has been Training Union Secretary for North Carolina, became 
pastor of the First Baptist Church of Waynesboro, Georgia. There has been 
a steady increase in the growth of the Baptist Training Union work since 
1937, the year Mr. Brooks came to the Baptist Training Union Department. 
His spiritual depth and far-sighted vision permeated the spirit of Training 



Annual of Session 1943 99 

Union work in North Carolina. He is especially remembered for the superior 
program he prepared annually for the State Assembly at Ridgecrest. 

Mrs. Brooks, his capable companion, gave admirable assistance in the vari- 
ous times she helped on the field and directed the work of the Junior Depart- 
ment. 

One of the many fine contributions Mr. Brooks made to the work was the 
emphasis he placed on the "entire church family in Training Union and a 
family altar in every home." Baptist churches of North Carolina have been 
blessed by Mr. Brooks' consecration and intelligent planning. 

On October 11, 1943, the Reverend W. Wilbur Hutchins, formerly pastor 
of the Southside Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, N. C, assumed the secre- 
taryship. He has already made evident a spiritual insight and vision of Train- 
ing Union work which will lead in its continued growth. 

During the summer months Mr. Harold McManus, who is a student at the 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary ; Miss Louise Paschall, who is a stu- 
dent at the W. M. U. Training School ; and Miss Cleo Mitchell, who is now a 
faculty member in the Department of Religion and Student Secretary at 
Meredith College, assisted in the field program. 

Miss Margaret Sparks, Intermediate Leader, began her second year of 
service with the Department on September 1. We are indeed fortunate to have 
her lead the Intermediates of our state and they have already manifested their 
love for her. Her leadership in the work during the time the Department was 
without a Secretary was of inestimable value. 

Miss Mary Lou Wall, Office Secretary, is completing her seventh year with 
the Baptist State Convention. During the four and one-half months the 
Training Union Department was without a Secretary, Miss Wall's knowledge 
of the work kept it on it's upward growth. 

SOME ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 1943 

In spite of war-time conditions, the Training Union Department maintained 
a worthy and active program in 1943. 

1. This year associational officers were brought together in one of two 
Training Meetings in the state under the leadership of the Southwide Train- 
ing Union force. We expect more active growth in Training Union work in 
the associations because of this period of training. 

2. An Associational Enlargement Campaign was sponsored in the Robeson 
Association last April with sixteen churches participating. 

3. Ten Regional Conventions were held in the spring with a total regis- 
tration of 2,097. 

4. One thousand, two hundred twenty-seven persons registered for the State 
Assembly at Ridgecrest. Dr. J. Clyde Turner brought the series of evening 
messages. 

5. There were more than 800 North Carolinians who attended the two 
Southwide Training Union Conferences at Ridgecrest. This means a total of 
2,027 North Carolina Baptists were reached by the Training Union meetings 
at Ridgecrest in July. 

6. As shown in the chart on page 102, 63 churches were reached this 
summer by training courses and enlargement campaigns with leadership of the 
summer workers and the State Department. 



100 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

7. In the spring Mr. Brooks assisted with an Enlargement Campaign in 
Louisiana and in the fall Miss Sparks assisted with one in South Carolina. 
Miss Sparks also served on the faculty of the two Southwide Training Union 
weeks at Ridgecrest. 

8. The chart on page 103, pictures the work of the state as reported 
through the office in Raleigh. It might be stated here that a partial loss in 
units, directors, and churches having Training Union work is due to the 
fact that we, at the end of September each year, discard all records in our 
files from which we have had no information for three years. Thus, it is 
quite important that we urge each church in the state having Training Union 
work of any kind to report same to us at least once a year, affording us an 
opportunity to have up-to-date information in our files at the time the annual 
report is made. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

Nineteen forty- four presents itself as a year of opportunity. Careful and 
prayerful planning will be necessary if we prepare adequately to meet the 
following needs : 

1. Feverishness and anxiety caused by war-time conditions, may be uncon- 
sciously causing our people of the local church to diminish their efforts. As 
never before in our history we need to enlarge ! Not only is it vital that we 
"keep the home fires burning" but we need to "throw on another log" in 
every place possible so that the post-war world will find us ready to meet 
the training needs of our people. 

2. Our churches are finding it increasingly difficult to enlist leadership in 
the various phases of church activities. This year we will vigorously attempt to 
strengthen our Adult work which will not only produce more efficient and 
trained leaders in our churches, but will result in more Young People enlisted 
in Training Union work and more positive Christian homes. This in turn 
will decrease juvenile delinquency and similar problems. 

3. At this crucial stage in our world history, there is a cry for Christian 
citizenship. It is our plan to emphasize in our Training Union work the 
necessity of our taking a decisive stand against the sale of alcoholic beverages 
and other such current evils which face us. We purpose to guide our people 
to a consciousness of civic righteousness, the need for Christian political leaders, 
and the need for informed, consecrated voters. 

4. Due to the numerous influences of various attitudes and philosophies con- 
cerning the lack of necessity for denominations, we propose to put a major 
emphasis on our Baptist doctrines and denominational life. 

5. During these busy days, filled with so many civic and social activities, 
we will seek through the Training Union to stress the church-centered life. 
It is our hope to see adequate provision for: (a) mental growth through an 
increased emphasis on Bible study and the study course program; (b) physical 
and social growth through stewardship, temperance, and recreational pro- 
gram; (c) spiritual growth through an emphasis on evangelism and devotional 
life which will lead to missionary vision and a consciousness of world brother- 
hood. 

We feel that if these above factors are majored upon along with the other 
endeavors of the Training Union program, our Baptist Adults, because of an 
increased faith will find balance, poise, and security even in these chaotic' days, 
and our Young People, Intermediates, and Juniors will in turn be provided 



Annual of Session 1943 101 

with proper guidance in facing the choices necessary for them to make, many 
of whom will dedicate their lives for definite religious service. 

Unless the Training Union Department is provided with at least two more 
workers, a consecrated Young People's and Junior Leader, the work will be 
greatly handicapped in trying to reach the above goals. 

DEDICATION 

We are dedicated to the Christian conviction that any vital religious train- 
ing must be the superstructure on the foundation of a personal faith in God. 
But Christian training will open the channels through which faith in Christ 
can effectively express itself. So we dedicate ourselves with the best that is 
in us, under God, to : 

1. Work with other Baptist Christians to help awaken in the masses of our 
people a "sense of need" for training as a necessary corollary of evangelism. 

2. Try to gain for the training ministry of our churches a more strategic 
place in the thinking and planning of all our leadership. 

3. Use training, and organization for training, not as an end in itself, but 
as a tool, an instrument given us by God to use for him as good stewards of 
the manifold grace of God, in helping all our people to develop intelligent 
and constructive understanding of the spiritual issues of our day, to the end 
that we may be laborers with Him in the coming Kingdom of Heaven. 

87. 

3. Division of Student Work 
R. T. Howerton, Jr., Secretary 
Personnel 

The Student Division is happy to introduce several new personalities on its 
staff, as well as to present some veterans in student work. Meredith College 
is justly proud of its new Director of Religious Activities, Miss Cleo Mitchell, 
who guides the work of Meredith's Baptist Student Union with expert skill, 
earned in her experience as student secretary at the Woman's College in 
Greensboro, and in her three years of graduate study at Yale University 
Divinity School in the field of student religious work, which led to her B.D. 
and M.A. degrees. A sample of her ability to secure student cooperation is her 
recent stewardship drive. The students of Meredith have signed pledges 
directly to their churches in Raleigh amounting to $2,000. In return the 
churches have pledged to the students $500 with which to finance the budget 
of the Baptist Student Union of Meredith College. 

Miss Louise Green, known among students at Appalachian as "Maw 
Green," is by no means elderly. Her nickname is evidence of her understand- 
ing personality and spiritual depth. The students go to her with all kinds of 
problems, find solutions, and send their friends. Miss Green is from Auburn 
University in Alabama, where for four years she was effectively active on the 
campus of B. S. U. Council. After teaching school a year, she followed her 
heart to student work in North Carolina, coming in August, following the 
resignation of Mrs. J. Elwood Roberts in June. 

The marriage of Miss Laura Bateman to Lt. John E. Lawrence (Navy) 
left a vacancy at the student house in Greensboro, which was filled in Sep- 
tember by Mrs. Howard G. McClain, formerly Miss Barbara Behrman of 



102 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



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Annual of Session 1943 
TRAINING UNION CHART NO. 2 



103 





Churches 


Units 


Total 

Num- 
ber 
Units 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
in Units 


Study 
Course 
Awards 
Jan.- 
Sept. 


Associations 


With 
T. U. 


With 
Direc- 
tors 


Story 
Hour 


[unior 


Inter- 
medi- 
ate 


Young 
People 


Adult 




6 
1 
1 

4 

7 

3 

8 

7 

21 

2 

6 

S 

44 

24 

24 

25 

19 

16 

15 

9 

2 

24 

2 

7 

8 

31 

6 

19 

22 

35 

23 

15 

14 

29 

4 

8 

38 

6 

1 

20 

11 

41 

26 

27 

17 

31 

25 

17 

17 

29 

22 

9 

14 

10 

2 

4 

8 

15 

8 

14 

10 

13 

15 

23 

2 

7 

18 

8 

11 

8 

1 


6 

1 

1 

3 

6 

3 

8 

6 

21 

2 

5 

4 

39 

20 

22 

25 

19 

15 

13 

8 

2 

21 

2 

6 

7 

30 

5 

18 

19 

31 

21 

IS 

13 

29 

3 

8 

37 

6 

1 

19 

10 

40 

23 

26 

17 

25 

23 

16 

14 

27 

21 

9 

12 

10 

2 

3 

8 

13 

5 

14 

8 

12 

14 

21 

2 

6 

18 

7 

10 

8 

1 


4 

1 

1 

2 
2 

12 

1 

1 

1 

19 

20 

13 

9 

17 



3 



1 

IS 



1 

1 

34 

6 

9 

4 

10 

11 

8 

2 

20 

2 

4 

11 

2 



4 

2 

23 

IS 

13 

12 

9 

12 

9 

3 

11 
18 
6 
13 
6 

1 
2 
3 
1 
6 
2 
5 
3 

13 

3 
11 
3 
S 
4 



S 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

5 

4 

19 

2 

5 

3 

31 

24 

18 

14 

18 

12 

7 

3 

1 

22 

2 

4 

4 

40 

8 

11 

11 

27 

25 

10 

11 

35 

4 

6 

26 

4 



13 

6 

31 

23 

21 

13 

20 

21 

13 

11 

IS 

22 

7 

19 
8 

2 
4 
9 
4 
10 
4 
6 
5 

21 

4 
13 
5 
8 
1 



6 



3 
1 
4 
3 

17 

2 

3 

S 

31 

24 

17 

16 

19 

12 

10 

6 

1 

21 

1 

6 

3 

44 

8 

15 

15 

25 

26 

10 

11 

29 

3 

9 

26 

6 



10 

7 

30 

23 

23 

11 

22 

22 

17 

12 

15 

27 

8 

15 

9 



2 

4 

11 

1 

10 

S 

6 

5 

21 



6 

12 

3 

10 
1 



4 
1 

2 

2 

8 

0' 

5 

4 

17 

3 

5 

2 

24 

21 

17 

18 

12 

17 

9 

1 

1 

13 

1 

5 

16 

28 

6 

11 

6 

17 

16 

14 

10 

25 

5 

7 

22 

1 

1 

14 

7 

30 

20 

23 

9 

20 

14 

11 

8 

13 

20 

6 

11 

7 

1 

1 

6 

9 

4 

10 

5 

5 

7 

13 



3 

11 
3 
7 
3 
1 


6 
1 
1 

2 
1 
4 
3 

10 

2 

2 

2 

30 

26 

13 

17 

IS 

7 

7 

1 

1 

14 

1 

4 

3 

31 

S 

. 11 

7 

11 

13 

10 

6 

24 

2 

9 

23 

2 



8 

1 

25 

20 

13 

14 

7 

16 
10 
6 
12 
25 
5 

13 
6 

1 
3 
S 
2 
11 
3 
4 
4 
14 
U 
1 
7 
4 
6 
2 
1 


25 
3 
5 
3 

17 
3 
20 
16 
75 
10 
16 
13 

135 

115 
78 
74 
81 
48 
36 
11 
5 

85 

5 

20 

27 

177 
33 
57 
43 
90 
91 
52 
40 

133 
16 
35 

108 

15 

1 

49 

23 

139 

101 
93 
59 
78 
85 
60 
40 
66 

112 

32 

71 

36 

1 

7 

19 
37 
12 
47 
19 
26 
24 
82 

17 
54 
18 
36 
11 
2 


Gain 5 

Same 
Loss 3 

Same 

Same 
Loss 3 

Same 
Loss 4 
Gain 1 
Gain 1 
Loss 1 

Same 
Loss IS 
Loss 17 
Gain 9 
Gain 14 
Loss 1 
Loss 7 
Loss 10 
Loss 12 

Same 
Loss 4 
Gain 4 
Loss 1 
Gain 5 
Gain 3 
Loss 2 
Gain 3 
Loss 1 
Gain 3 
Gain 5 
Loss 4 
Gain 3 
Loss 45 
Gain 5 
Loss 16 
Loss 2 
Loss 4 

Same 
Loss 4 
Loss 10 
Loss 8 
Loss 2 
Loss 8 
Loss 2 
Loss 3 
Gain 16 
Loss 6 
Loss 13 
Gain 9 
Loss 4 
Loss 8 

Same 
Loss 24 
Loss 1 

Same 
Loss 8 
Loss 12 

Same 
Loss 2 
Loss 2 
Gain 4 
Loss 40 
Gain 7 
Loss 1 
Loss 3 
Loss 15 

Same 
Gain 19 
Loss 7 
Loss 1 


97 














13 




88 









7 




3 




226 









12 


Brushy Mountain 


75 
335 




401 




215 




360 


Catawba River 


431 
31 




57 




61 


Dock 


34 




197 


Elkin 


64 




51 


French Broad 


2 
796 
264 




337 




127 


Kings Mountain 


336 
189 




251 


Macon County 

Mecklenburg 


189 
458 
132 




20 




270 




169 







New South River 


168 

98 




665 


Pilot Mountain 


113 
154 









299 




685 


Rowan 

Sandy Creek 


74 

87 

332 




368 


South Mountain 


16 
276 
138 


Stone Mountain 








SO 




128 


Tennessee River 


28 
43 


Transylvania 


12 
70 




13 


West Chowan 

West Liberty 

Western N. C 


104 

1 

228 


Yadkin 


34 




197 


Burnt Swamp 


91 







Totals 


1,024 


945 


465 


767 


786 


679 


576 


3,273 


Net Loss 
221 


10,770 



104 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Meredith and Greensboro. Mrs. McClain will continue her splendid work at 
the Woman's College until the return of Mrs. Lawrence sometime in December. 

Following a doctor's order for a two month's rest at her Greenville, 
Alabama home, Miss Mary Lee Ernest returned in September to the Student 
House at E. C. T. C. to continue her well-rounded program of promotion, 
guidance and counselling. 

The Baptist men of N. C. State have as their part-time student secretary 
Mr. David Harris, who has been working since April in enlisting the Baptist 
students in the churches of Raleigh. 

For years the students of Duke University have presented a challenge to 
Durham pastors and the student department. A turn for the better came with 
the advent of Dr. C. Sylvester Green to the Duke campus as Director of 
Religious Activities. He will greatly assist the newly-appointed part-time 
student secretary, Mr. Harold Townsend, a student at Duke University Divinity 
School, recent graduate of Wake Forest College, where he served as B. S. U. 
president. 

Mrs. Howard L. Bowman, graduate of Mars Hill, who served as office 
secretary for the student department for two years, resigned in order to finish 
work toward her B. A. degree at Meredith College. She was succeeded by 
Miss Adelaide Charles, Meredith '43, of Winston- Salem. 

The work of these six full-time and two part-time secretaries is supple- 
mented by pastors in college centers, faculty advisers, directors of religious 
activities, and friends of college students all over the State. 

Campus Organizations 

Listed below are the Baptist Student Union presidents with their pastors 
and faculty advisers. (See Chart). 

State Officers 

North Carolina Baptist Student Union Officers, 1943-44: 

President Calvin Knight Wake Forest 

Enlistment Vice-President . .Una Lee Richardson A. S. T. C. 

Social Vice-President Elizabeth Shelton Meredith 

Devotional Vice-President Jane Carroll W. C. U. N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Florence Gordon Mars ' Hill 

Publicity Director Richard Duncan N. S. State 

"Baptist Student" Repr Jim Satterwhite Bowman Gray 

Music Director Elizabeth White Atlantic Christian 

Program for the Year 
1. Local 

The major features of the year's activity are local, statewide and south- 
wide in nature. Generally, the activities of the Baptist Student Union on the 
campus include the following : September : Pre-school planning retreat, Maga- 
zine campaign, Welcoming social, Organization of S. S., B. T. U., Y. W. A., 
prayer meetings, Bible study groups, Join-the-Church-Sunday ; October-Nov- 
ember : Stewardship drive, study courses, delegations to State Student Conven- 
tion, Thanksgiving services, socials ; December : Help to needy groups, Student 
Night at Christmas ; January : Join-the-Church-Sunday, study courses, inven- 
tory of year's work; February: Religious emphasis week; March: Mission 



Annual of Session 1943 105 

Study course; April: Election of officers, Spring retreats for officers, Volun- 
teering for summer service ; May : Installation Banquet, M other's Day pro- 
grams ; June: Southwith B. S. U. Conference, Ridgecrest; June- July-August, 
S. S., and B. T. U. field work. 

2. Statewide 

Statewide activities during the year were as follows : Planning Conference 
for remainder of year's work, January 29-30, held at Pullen Memorial in 
Raleigh, with 35 students and secretaries attending; April 10-11, Eastern 
Spring Retreat, 125 newly elected officers attending; April 17-18, Western 
Spring Retreat, Ridgecrest, 80 attending; Annual Baptist Student Convention, 
First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, 300 out-of-town registrants, total 
attending, 550. 

During the spring Miss Mary Nance Daniel, Southwide Associate in the 
Student Department visited North Carolina to conduct conferences at the 
Spring Retreats. While here she visited and spoke at the Woman's College, 
U. N. C, Baptist Hospital, and Duke University. 

Dr. Claude U. Broach, also Southwide Associate in the Student Depart- 
ment, visited the State in May. He spoke at Wake Forest, Meredith, Duke, 
U. N. C, W. C. U. N. C, Mars Hill, and N. C. State. 

The Annual Student Convention 

The First Baptist Church of Winston-Salem was host to the 300 out-of- 
town students who attended the Annual Baptist Convention October 22-24. 
The total in attendance was around 550. Speakers and their topics were as 
follows : Rev. Francis W. McPeek, of the Washington Federation of Churches, 
"The Church Against Crime" ; Dr. Claude U. Broach, "B. S. U. Serving the 
Changing Campus" ; Dr. Harold W. Tribble, two addresses on "Christ Meets 
the Needs of the World"; and Dr. J. W. "Bill" Marshall, "I Was Hungry 
and Ye Gave Me Meat." Dr. Broach taught the Sunday School lesson, for 
which the entire student delegation met in a group with the Young People's 
Department of the Sunday School. The lesson was taught by means of a 
Panel discussion. 

Two one-hour forum discussions were lead by outstanding thinkers, who 
are listed here with their subjects: "Great Christian Affirmations, Dr. Kelley 
Barnett; "The Spiritual Peril of Moral Compromise," Dr. O. T. Binkley; 
"Private Devotion and Public Worship," Dr. Qaude U. Broach; "Our Racial 
Minorities," Mr. Edwin L. Duckies, field Secretary for American Friends 
Service Committee ; "Vocational Guidance in a World at War," Dr. Alphonse 
Heninburg, National Urban League ; "Winning the World to Christ," Dr. J. W. 
Marshall, Foreign Mission Board. 

Dr. C. C. Carpenter, Dean of the Bowman Gray Medical School, was 
chairman of the Panel Quiz, during which students questioned each of the 
above leaders from the floor, the leaders responding with invaluable answers 
and opinions. 

Dr. Ralph A. Herring delivered the convention sermon using the keynote, 
"In God We Trust," as his topic. The message was inspiring and led the 
students to the spiritual climax of the meeting. The Holy Spirit was inter- 
preted in the sermon as the indispensable energizing power for Christian 
living. 



106 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



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Annual of Session 1943 107 

Southwide 

The annual Southwide B. S. U. Conference at Ridgecrest June 9-16 was 
attended by 1,415 students, 110 of them North Carolinians. After welcoming 
the delegations with a reception in the hotel lobby, they participated in a 
challenging and inspiring program, the largest of its kind in the world. 

Prospects 

The needs of the students of the State and the responsibility of the Student 
Department will be met only when there are fully qualified student secre- 
taries on more of our larger college and university campuses. Obviously, student 
religious work must be carried on under adequate adult leadership. A com- 
parison of student work on campuses served by full time secretaries with 
the work on campuses where there are none, will prove the great value of 
the qualified student secretary. Experience has shown that in a short while 
the student secretary, from a financial point of view alone, will more than 
pay his way by securing contributions to local churches from students while 
they are in college. The greater value of the local secretary in developing 
leadership among our college youth can only be measured by the history of 
this denomination in years to come. 

A plea is here made, also, for ministers, in college communities to count 
college students equally as valuable to their churches as business men and 
women and other adults. College students are not transients. They are not 
children. They are adults, or fast becoming. They are prospects for full 
membership in churches. Pastors and other church workers would make no 
mistake to look on them as such, and to visit them with the persistence equal 
to that applied to business men, school teachers, and professional people. It 
is the task of the student department to help the churches in this work. 

Pastors of students who leave home for college should encourage them to 
take with them their church letters, or to write for them immediately upon 
joining a church in" the college center. The help of pastors in college com- 
munities, already most genuine and generous, would be invaluable if directed 
toward the goal of securing the full membership of college students. 

One of the leading churches in the State has abolished the affiliatory or 
watch-care status for new-comers, encouraging full membership only. Full 
church membership is a necessary basis for the highest Christian living which 
is the aim of all our striving. 

88. 

B. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE COLLEGES 

1. Reports of the Colleges 

Elsewhere in this report will be found references to the educational debt 
of the Convention, the amount furnished the several colleges for current 
support, and to a statement concerning our general educational problems. 

Brief reports from the colleges, submitted by the presidents of the various 
schools, and statistical exhibits follow. 



108 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

89. 

(a) CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

B. F. McLeod, President of Board of Trustees 
L. H. Campbell, President 

War has taken from and added to. Vacant rooms in the dormitories for 
boys constantly remind us of war's heavy toll upon every constructive agency. 
But the tragedy of this whole catastrophe strengthens the conviction that the 
promotion of intelligent goodness, the good of Christian Education, is the 
only sure way out. The importance of the truly Christian College in world 
reconstruction is magnified as the ruins wrought by pagan idealogies become 
more appalling. 

A reduction of 75 is shown in the overall enrollment from last year. A 
large number of girls on the campus is more than offset by the greater reduc- 
tion in resident boys and day students. The classification cards show a decreased 
number registered for liberal arts courses, with an increase in Commercial 
Education and college preparatory classes. 

In spite of heavy losses incurred during last year to the armed services, 
the auditor's report shows that the financial conditions of the college is excel- 
lent. Final payment has this year been made on the $20,000 loan negotiated 
some years ago to repair the D. Rich Administration building. At the same 
time the J. A. Campbell home place, containing approximately 115 acres, has 
been purchased and paid for without incurring a loan. Henceforth this property, 
for years leased as the college dairy and stock farm, can be used rent-free 
and made to supply essential foods difficult to purchase on the market even 
at higher cost. 

Despite many perplexing problems experienced in operating a small 
denominational college in war time, certain advantages are enjoyed by such 
institutions not taken over partially or wholly by the government for defense 
training. Less regimentation, fewer distractions, and greater spiritual freedom 
must now exist; and for the future, less likelihood of entangling alliances. 
At the same time it is hoped that as pressure of outward circumstances in- 
creases, a correspondingly greater reliance upon denominational cooperation 
may produce a closer fellowship with other Baptist institutions and agencies. 

Every effort is being made to maintain high scholastic standards in spite 
of the teacher shortage. Requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools are being observed, in order that the college's mem- 
bership may continue unquestioned. 

90. 

(b) CHOWAN COLLEGE 

J. Mayon Parker, President of Board of Trustees 

Faced with a war-born decline in enrollment, with sharply increasing 
operating costs for this reason as well as from the general affect of the 
war to increase operating costs, and with the difficult task of maintaining 
a capable faculty and administration against the competition of the constant 
drain of man- and woman-power to the armed forces, action suspensing 
Chowan College for the duration of the present national emergency was taken 
by its Board of Trustees at the close of the 1942-43 session of the school. 
The action was taken for the purpose of conserving the assets and endow- 
ment of the college for service in the years of peace following this great 



Annual of Session 1943 109 

conflict when youth again will be seeking Christian training for living rather 
than driven by necessity as at present to learn the skills of war. The sus- 
pension was achieved with all assets and endowment intact, and with all 
current obligations discharged. 

91. 

(c) GARDNER-WEBB 

Phil L. Elliott, President 
(No report received) 
92. 

(d) MARS HILL COLLEGE 

E. F. Watson, President of Board of Trustees 
Hoyt Blackwell, President 

The eighty-eighth session of Mars Hill College is gratifying from many 
points of view. The present enrollment is 657 regular college students and 
15 special students. Most of the specials are young children of the com- 
munity who are taking music. In the regular college group there are 173 
young men and 484 young women. In this number are 23 ministerial students 
and 2 children of missionaries. Of the college students, 627 are church mem- 
bers. Dr. Theodore F. Adams of Richmond is now leading us in our annual 
revival meeting. We believe that his Christian personality, his gospel sermons, 
and the Christian atmosphere of the campus and of the local church will be 
the means of reaching many of the 25 members of our college family who 
have not yet publicly named Christ as their Saviour and Lord. 

The college has lost several of its teachers to the armed forces. All neces- 
sary adjustments and replacements have been made, and the present faculty 
and general staff are capable and aggressively Christian. Those who began 
their work with us at the beginning of the present year are : Miss Mattie 
Russell, history ; Mr. C. H. Sullivan, mathematics and physics ; Miss Anne 
Clayton, physical education; Mrs. Winifred Thurlow, dietitian; Mrs. Paul 
Dunstan, assistant in the library ; Miss Brucie Barnes, hostess in Edna Moore 
and New dormitories; Mrs. W. S. Sparks, hostess in Rivermont and cottages 
for young men; Mrs. A. K. Cheek, secretary to the Registrar; Miss Edith 
Swann, bookkeeper. 

The first term of the summer school as an integral part of the regular 
schedule of the college was most satisfactory. Much credit is due Dean R. M. 
Lee, the faculty, and those in the offices for this achievement. There were 
142 students enrolled; the budget was paid in full without drawing upon the 
resources of the college treasury ; and prospects for the coming summer are 
favorable. 

For the calendar year 1942, the Convention made an appropriation of 
$9,500 to Mars Hill for current support. For the present calendar year, 1943, 
this appropriation was increased to $15,000. Had it not been for the added 
amount of $5,500 the loss from student tuition and fees and the loss of 
$9,500 through NYA might have been critical. The college is keenly aware of 
its added obligation to this Convention. Its constant purpose shall be dedicate 
its all to Christ-permeated education. 

The college is now entering upon the ninth year of its present enlargement 
and endowment program. Since this movement was launched approximately 
$500,000 in new buildings, equipment, repairs to old buildings, and improve- 



110 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

ments generally has been added to its physical resources. It will require at least 
another $500,000 to accomplish the goal which has been set. Those who have 
brought us to the half-way mark will let nothing turn them aside until this 
work is done. 
93. 

(a) MEREDITH COLLEGE 

W. H. Weatherspoon, President of Board of Trustees 
Carlyle Campbell, President 

The total enrollment for 1942-43 was 461. Students registered from three 
foreign countries, 13 states, and 72 counties in North Carolina. The academic 
classification of the 416 regular college students shows 132 freshmen, 83 
sophomores, 90 juniors, and 111 seniors. According to denominational affiliation, 
indicated at the beginning of the year, there were 318 Baptists, 54 Methodists, 
20 Presbyterians, 21 members of other denominational groups, and 21 unidenti- 
fied with any church. In the student body were 28 daughters of ministers, and 
six daughters of missionaries. 

The auditor's report on operations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1943, 
indicates an income of $263,750.54, and expenditures amounting to $252,922.43. 
Almost 72% of the total income was received from students. Over 99% of 
student accounts receivable had been paid in cash before the end of the year. 
The College received in gifts during the year $18,804.50. 

It is impossible in this brief report to make a detailed summary or evalua- 
tion of the year's activities. Yet, in spite of the dislocations and pressures of 
a war economy, we feel that the achievement of the year was essentially 
commendable. Special reference is made to Religious Emphasis Week, in 
February, under the leadership of Dr. Ralph A. Herring, of Winston-Salem. 
We record with deep regret the death of Mr. F. B. Hamrick on May 24, 1943; 
since 1929 he had been the efficient and greatly beloved bursar and treasurer 
of the College. 

The year 1943-44 has begun auspiciously. We have the largest enrollment 
since 1940, and the largest freshman class since 1938. We are equally pleased 
with the apparent ability and promise of the new students admitted. An im- 
proved financial situation made possible some important renovations to the 
plant during the summer. Under the guidance of Miss Cleo Mitchell, religious 
counselor and instructor in the department of religion, we are developing a 
specific program for the training of church workers. 

We are now preparing to launch the expansion program referred to in 
this report a year ago. During the spring and summer educational experts made 
a survey of the College and its constituency, and on the basis of their report 
the Board of Trustees has authorized a financial campaign for $565,000, for 
buildings, additions to endowment, and permanent improvements. Of this 
amount, $65,000 is already in hand. In this challenging and sacred enterprise, 
we confidently expect the interest and support of our Baptist people. 

94. 

(f) WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

John A. Oates, President of Board of Trustees 
T. D. Kitchin, President 

Wake Forest College reports the smallest enrollment since 1910. That year 
there were 403 students in the college. At present there are 448, not including 



Annual of Session 1943 111 

students in the medical school. Many of these are sixteen and seventeen year- 
old freshmen and will not be allowed to stay in college long. Since Pearl 
Harbor 1,050 students have been lost from our classrooms to the Armed 
Forces. 

Up to the present we have lost twenty members of the instructional staff 
to the service. No additions have been made to the faculty since the last 
meeting of the Convention. 

The Law School of the college has suffered a heavy loss in enrollment 
during the war period as all other law schools in the country. By an earlier 
order of the Board of Trustees the Law School was to be kept open if at all 
possible to do so. The solution to the problem came in the form of a merger 
with the law school of Duke University. Neither law school loses its identity 
in the merger, both seemed to be accommodated and the plan is working out 
satisfactorily. For the present the students registered in both law schools are 
being taught on the Duke University campus. The experience thus far com- 
mends the merger which is wholly an emergency measure. 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College, located 
here in Winston-Salem, has had a more fortunate experience than the Law 
School. This is because of the increased demand for medical education in 
order to meet the needs of the Armed Forces and the depleted service among 
civilians as well. The enrollment in the Medical School is all that can be 
accommodated and there is a long waiting list. The total enrollment in the 
Medical School is now 164 and is composed of civilian students and students 
inducted into the Army and Navy under the Specialized Training Program. 
The college will confer the M. D. degree on 34 members of the senior class 
the 21st of December. Classes enter each nine months and classes will also 
be graduating at the same intervals. 

A unit of the Army Finance School was established at Wake Forest 
College in August, 1942. This at one time seemed to be a fortunate opportunity 
for the college for the duration. A highly select group of men were sent to 
the campus for periods of twelve weeks' training. They came from practically 
all states in the Union and they represent the kind of men that we are glad 
to have as friends throughout the entire country. Our relationships with the 
men and the officers have been mutually pleasant and the officers have been 
thoroughly satisfied with the college and the opportunities offered them. 

The War Department has given notice however, that by January 15 the 
Army Finance School at Wake Forest College would be wholly moved back 
to its home post at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. You will be interested to 
know why this change of plan has come about. Following World War No. 1, 
a small Army Finance School has been in operation at Fort Benjamin Harri- 
son for the training of men in handling the government finances in Army 
posts and stations. With the great increase of the Army, the Finance School 
had to be increased. There was not room for it at the original post at that 
time and they sought opportunity at Wake Forest College for the non-com- 
missioned branch. There is now plenty of space available at Fort Benjamin 
Harrison and the Army's policy of conservation of funds now warrants the 
return of the Wake Forest Finance School to its permanent post. I quote the 
following statement from the Headquarters Army Service Forces : 

"May I stress the fact that the withdrawal is not to be inter- 
preted in any sense as dissatisfaction with the facilities or man- 



112 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

agement of the school. On the contrary, it is evident from my 
discussions with those of my staff who are intimately familiar 
with Wake Forest that they think very highly of the school and 
are deeply conscious of the contribution this school has made and 
continues to make towards the war effort." 

The removal of the Finance School is naturally a disappointment, coming 
in the midst of the duration, because the college has been put to considerable 
expense in modifications in order to meet the needs of our Finance Unit. 
Furthermore, it is especially bad for the contract to be cancelled in the 
middle of the college fiscal year because our budget for 1943-44 was set up in 
the light of a clear statement that our contract with the Army would run 
until June 30, 1944. We thought nothing could be surer than a government 
contract. 

The college made, in December 1942, application for a unit of the Army 
Specialized Training Program. In due time Wake Forest College was desig- 
nated by the Army for the establishment on our campus of a pre-medical unit. 
The college was inspected by several officials at various times and was heartily 
approved. But our experience is similar to the experience of other institutions 
designated by the Army for pre-medical training in our general area, namely, 
the units have not been activated yet. There is at least uncertainty in the mind 
of all, perhaps the Army itself, concerning its progress in this particular and 
restricted field. The Navy, however, has activated pre-medical units at several 
nearby institutions but the Army operates on a different program. Upon the 
advice of inspectors, we have gone to some expense already in getting ready for 
the pre-medical unit. 

I mention these matters because you are entitled to have full information. 
The work goes on notwithstanding the distractions and inconveniences of war. 
The courses most in demand are kept available. The purpose and spirit of 
the college are maintained but there are financial problems arising inevitably 
in the situation that I have just described. 

95. 

(g) WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

P. B. Upchurch, President of Board of Trustees 
C. C. Burris, President 

Wingate College closed its 46th session the last of May, and the fiscal 
year June IS. The enrollment for the year was below normal for men, but 
above normal for women, which was perfectly natural, due to the emergency. 
Despite the war our faculty was held intact, and the same is true for the 
1943-44 session. Only a few changes have been made. Many of our boys were 
called away, but many were permitted to finish their year's work. 

From a financial standpoint, we had our best year, operating with a sur- 
plus of income over expenses. We have been able to do this for the last five 
years due to increase in gifts from the churches and the Baptist State Con- 
vention and by practicing strict economy. 

The College has launched its 50th anniversary campaign for new buildings 
and equipment, payment of debt, and for a general plant renovation. Mr. Joel 
Herren, as Alumni Secretary, is in charge of this campaign and has already 
begun his work with marked results., 

Wingate is located in the center of the population of the two Carolinas 



Annual of Session 1943 



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Annual of Session 1943 115 

and is surrounded by thousands of Baptists who have the College on their 
hearts. The College wishes to be a part of the Baptist Educational program 
in North Carolina, even though it could continue the present Associational 
ownership. 

It is the dawn — the new day is at hand. Will Baptists of North Carolina 
seize the day and through Christian Education make it the day in which the 
King shall reign? 

96. 

V. BENEVOLENCE 

Under the present arrangement we think of the orphanage, hospital and 
aged ministers' relief when the word "benevolence" is mentioned. We should 
not think of the Ministers' Retirement Plan as benevolence. However, we 
include a statement here concerning it, because it is closely akin to relief and 
both are administered by the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

97. 

A. RELIEF AND ANNUITY 
1. Relief 
We are glad to print here for the information of the Convention, and for 
future reference, facts about relief and annuity as furnished us by Secretary 
Watts of the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
We call attention to the fact that the Relief and Annuity Board has many 
different funds and plans, and that beneficiaries in North Carolina under all 
these plans have received, or will receive during 1943 more than $65,000. 

(a) Relief Department 
Beneficiaries receiving aid during 1943 : Pastors 56, Widows 67, Total 
123, receiving payments of $10,484.25 

(b) Annuity Department 
(Old) Annuity Fund: 

Number of Members paying dues 90 

Age Annuitants 44, receiving annually $22,000.00 

Disability 17, receiving annually 8,500.00 

Widows 36, receiving annually 10,800.00 

Total $41,300.00 

Members in Baptist Boards Employees Retirement Plan State Board 34. 

No annuitants at present. 

Institutional Employees Retirement Plan for Orphanages 65. 

Number Annuitants 16, receiving annually $4,898.16 

Educational Institutions Employees Retirement Plan — 

Mars Hill College— 14. 
No annuitants at present. 
Age Security Plan : 
Number of persons participating 2. 
Churches participating 2. 
No beneficiaries at present. 

Service Annuity Plan: (Closed to New Members). 
Annuitants 1, Disability annuitant receiving annually $405.12 



116 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

(c) Ministers' Retirement Plan 

Total Certificates Issued 454 

Churches Cooperating 642 

Number receiving age annuities 15, receiving annually $5,642.52 

Number receiving disability annuities 4, receiving annually 1,928.76 

Number Widows 5, receiving annually 778.80 

Total $8,350.08 

Annual benefits paid in North Carolina under all plans — Relief 
and Annuity for the year of 1943 $65,437.61 

98. 

2. Orphanage 

Zeno Wall, President of Board of Trustees 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent 

Article I of our constitution says : "This institution shall be known as the 
Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, Incorporated, formerly known as 
Thomasville Baptist Orphanage and later known as the Mills Home, accord- 
ing to its amended charter, and shall have for its object the support and caring 
for and training of dependent children of the white race." 

There are two officials of the Orphanage, a general superintendent and 
a treasurer. Mr. I. G. Greer is the general superintendent and Mr. R. D. 
Covington is treasurer. Their offices are in Thomasville and are located on 
the Mills Home grounds. 

The Orphanage maintains two homes, the Mills Home in Thomasville and 
the Kennedy Home near Kinston. These are not two orphanages but are the 
two homes of the Baptist Orphanage. Each of these homes has a superintendent 
but neither has a separate treasurer, for the Orphanage treasurer handles all 
of the finances of both homes. Miss Sarah E. Elmore is superintendent of 
Mills Home and Rev. W. C. Reed is superintendent of Kennedy Home. 

The Social Service Department, Miss Hattie Edwards, director, receives 
all applications for the entrance of children into the Orphanage and after 
investigation makes recommendation to the general superintendent who makes 
the final decision. He says whether the child is to be accepted and if so into 
which home. If it seems best he places the child in a boarding home or estab- 
lishes a mothers' aid home. 

We have cared for during 1942, 687 in the two homes, 35 in boarding 
homes and 74 in their own homes. We have been able to place a larger num- 
ber than ever before, this enabling us to be of service to more children. 

Attendance in school reached almost 99 per cent due to the general good 
health of the children and the almost total absence of any contagious diseases. 

As a result of good food, regular hours and the cooperation of all work- 
ers, the health of our children is far above that of the outside population. 

Many activities are involved in the production of good food. The farm 
from which we receive fresh vegetables in abundance along with pork and 
beef, the dairy farm from which each child received a quart of whole milk 
daily, the poultry yard where all of our chickens and eggs are produced, and 
the 100,000 half gallon jars that are filled with every kind of fruit and vegetable 
by our friends all over North Carolina. All of these good things are sent 
out to our 19 kitchens of the two homes where they are prepared as well 
balanced meals under the supervision of trained workers. 



Annual of Session 1943 117 

Clothing to a great extent is made by the children, with the aid of compe- 
tent supervisors. 

More than 10,000 pieces pass through the two laundries each week. The 
greater part of this work is done by the girls. Colored help is employed for 
the heaviest of the labor. 

The physical education program goes on the year round with trained direc- 
tors in charge. 

A graded Sunday school, B. T. U., and W. M. U., both at Kennedy Home 
and Mills Home help in rounding out the lives of our boys and girls. 

Charity and Children is published each week at Mills Home and covers the 
activities of the entire Orphanage. Along with the paper a profitable com- 
mercial printing shop is maintained and large numbers of our boys are trained. 

One of the greatest assets of this Orphanage is the love of its many friends 
who support it. Our total gifts for 1942 through the current fund from 
churches and Sunday schools were $221,957.81. This includes the $100,197.54 
received during the Thanksgiving period. 

The continuation of the monthly offerings from the Sunday schools 
climaxed by another Thanksgiving offering as good or better than the one of 
last year will make it possible for us to meet the demands being placed upon 
us during these strenuous times. 

We must never lose sight of the one chief purpose of the Orphanage, 
and that is making worth while men and women out of dependent boys 
and girls. 

99. 

3. Hospital 

J. S. Lynch, President of Board of Trustees 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONSIDERATION 

The Board of Trustees of the hospital is happy to report satisfactory prog- 
ress towards the realization of the goal of rendering complete medical service 
to all who come to its doors. The Board of Trustees in their first report 
to the Convention in 1923 made the following statement : "Hospital facilities 
can be found in almost every town in the state, and if the Baptist Hospital 
has no special mission for its constituency it cannot hope to command the 
patronage of the public." This statement is even more true today in view 
of the fact that many towns and counties have since opened small hospitals 
for purely local service. The Baptist Hospital is state wide in its service, 
but more important, the coming of the Wake Forest Medical School with its 
staff of specialists, highly trained in many fields of medicine, enables the 
hospital to more fully fulfill its obligation as expressed by the Trustees in this 
first report to the Convention. 

PROFESSIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS 

When the new wing was opened in 1941, the hospital was able to give 
very little more than simple care for the ordinary illness. We now have an 
institution that is equipped, and provides the professional talent, to care for 
practically any illness that may be encountered. We are happy to report 
the addition to the staff during the year of a brain surgeon. Many cases that 
previously had to be sent home to die or remain permanent invalids can now 
be restored to health and usefulness. 



118 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The hospital is now fully approved by the American College of Surgeons. 
In the field of education, it enjoys the approval of the American Medical 
Association for post graduate education in training internes and advanced 
courses in medicine, surgery, radiology, anesthesiology, urology, obstetrics and 
gynecology, pediatrics, pathology, and thoracic surgery. We are one of twenty 
hospitals in the United States, out of a total of 6,345, that is approved for 
advanced training in surgery of the chest and lungs. In addition, we operate 
approved schools for x-ray technicians, anesthetists, laboratory technicians, 
and dietitians. Since the beginning of the expanded program, the hospital 
has trained 51 young men and women in these special fields. 

CHARITY SERVICE 

For the year October 1, 1941 to October 1, 1942 we treated in the hospital 
6,172 patients. Of these 1,228, or 20.9%, were service or charity patients. 
For this year, from October 1, 1942 to October 1, 1943, we treated in the 
hospital 7,565 patients. Of these 2,230, or 29.5%, were service or charity. 
In addition to those treated in the hospital, an outpatient department is oper- 
ated for the treatment of charity cases whose illness is not of such nature as 
to need hospital care. In this way we cared for 3,362 visits during the year 
October 1, 1941 to October 1, 1942; and for the year October 1, 1942 to 
October 1, 1943 we cared for 6,294 visits which represents an increase of 
87.2% in this charity service. In the combined hospital, or inpatient charity 
and outpatient or ambulatory charity rendered, we have during the year 
October 1, 1942 to October 1, 1943 increased our ministry bv 95.8% 

FINANCIAL 

On October 1, 1942 your hospital had completed its building and installed 
most of its equipment at a total cost of $647,246.29. Of this amount, $135,000 
was donated by Mr. Richard J. Reynolds, $170,000 was donated by The Duke 
Endowment, $95,000 was assumed by the Baptist State Convention, and $187,- 
246.29 was raised through general subscriptions. An unpaid balance of 
$60,000 is outstanding. The Convention, at its meeting in High Point last 
year, granted the Trustees permission to borrow this amount and assume obli- 
gation for its repayment. It was borrowed from the Security Life and Trust 
Company of Winston- Salem, and is payable $6,000 per year over a period of 
ten years. 

On October 1, 1942 we found ourselves facing a difficult problem in meet- 
ing the cost of operation of the newly expanded hospital. In addition to the 
increase in costs generally experienced in every walk of life, we faced the 
necessary increase in cost of the operation of facilities never before afforded. 
For illustration, the cost of caring for an ordinary illness, like appendicitis or 
pneumonia, is little more than the price of board and room. The cost of 
caring for the more complicated conditions, like cancer of the lung or brain 
tumor, because of the highly scientific equipment and facilities necessary, is 
three or four times greater than the cost of ordinary care. Before the medical 
school made available to the hospital specialists qualified to care for such con- 
ditions, we did not face this type of expense. Now, we are rendering this 
added service to the indigent as well as to those able to pay for such services. 
This financial crisis has been met in a most satisfactory manner. 

On October 1, 1942 we owed $31,060.97 on unpaid bills for operation of 
the hospital and had available only $74.11 in cash to meet these obligations. 



Annual of Session 1943 119 

Six months later, on April 1, 1943, we owed in unpaid accounts $49,510.42 
and a note at the bank for $15,000 that represented money that had been bor- 
rowed to pay the account of those we owed who would not extend our credit 
further. To pay this total of $64,510.42 we had cash on hand in the amount 
of $72.00. 

Investigation of the situation by a special finance committee appointed to 
supervise the financial operations of the hospital revealed that closer attention 
to the collection of accounts owed by those amply able to pay would materially 
help reduce this deficit. 

At the time of the beginning of the expanded program in 1940, the Trustees 
anticipated this difficulty and included at that time in the plan of organization 
the employment of a trained hospital administrator to attend to this phase of 
the work. During the period of about two years an administrator had not 
been added because of the high qualifications deemed necessary by the Board 
of Trustees for a man to fill that position. In the early part of June of this 
year, we were fortunate in securing for this position Mr. Ray E. Brown. Mr. 
Brown assumed his duties on June 20, 1943. 

On obtaining an administrator, the Trustees released Superintendent Smith 
Hagaman from routine duties in the operation of the hospital in order that 
he might give his full time to the general interest of the hospital in its rela- 
tion to the denomination. The wisdom of this arrangement is proved by the 
fact that through his diligent efforts and relief from other responsibilities, 
Superintendent Hagaman has this year led our people to increase the Mother's 
Day Offering from $41,992.13 last year to $66,940.75 this year. 

We are happy to report that we are now operating the hospital within 
its income. The generous increase in the Mother's Day Offering to $66,940.75 
plus the receipt of an allowance for charity from The Duke Endowment 
amounting to $22,671 provided funds sufficient to pay our deficit and leave a 
moderate fund for working capital. In addition, we have during the year 
added new equipment valued at $7,580.12. 

On October 1, 1943 we had no outstanding bills for the operation of the 
hospital, and the note of $15,000 borrowed from the bank in the early part of 
the year to pay operation deficit had been paid. We had on hand at that time 
a cash balance of $25,995.08. 

mother's day offering 
The Trustees and administrative officers consider it their primary duty to 
see that every dollar of funds contributed for charity is used only for those 
who are actually unable to care for themselves. Occasionally, we will make 
erroneous decisions, but with the help of pastors and church leaders we make 
every effort to obtain the facts. As a second objective, we, through economy 
where possible and cooperative effort in every department, try to make your 
charity dollar go as far as possible. Both of these objectives have come nearer 
attainment during the past year. Whereas the Mother's Day Offering that 
was available for the first nine months of 1943 for the payment of the cost 
of free service was only $50,205.42 the hospital gave free service costing 
$102,186.19. It is estimated that for twelve months this will amount to $136,- 
248.24. This amount accounts for only a share of the cost of rendering this 
service. A conservative estimate will show that the hospital cost represents 
less than half of the total cost of the care of a hospital patient. The remain- 
ing cost is that provided in the professional care of the patient. The staff 



120 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

of the medical school has provided this professional care free. Assuming 
that this cost is only equal to and no greater than the hospital cost, in round 
figures your hospital has given in free service to those coming to its door 
unable to pay during the first nine months of this year $204,372.38 for a 
Mother's Day contribution for that period amounting to $50,205.42, or for a 
Mother's Day contribution for the year of $66,940.75 we will give in free 
service $272,496.48. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

It is obvious that medical care given free to an individual costs just as 
much as if the individual paid for the service. This cost must be met in some 
way if a deficit is to be prevented. We have the equipment and professional 
talent now for an even greater service to the needy than that rendered during 
the first nine months of this year. As Christians, we must realize that healing 
was a major portion of Christ's ministry. As Christians and followers of 
His such becomes our duty. 

It is recommended that the Convention establish for the coming year a 
goal of $150,000 for the Mother's Day Offering. It is further recommended 
that the first $75,000 of this amount be used to pay for charity work in the 
hospital ; that the second $75,000 be used to retire the debt on the hospital 
assumed by the Convention. At the end of this year, there will remain unpaid 
approximately $60,000 of the $95,000 assumed on the new addition to the 
hospital and $24,000 on the original debt. Five per cent of the cooperative pro- 
gram formerly awarded to the hospital is now being retained in the business 
office of the Convention to help meet this debt. We wish to further recommend 
that when this debt is paid the hospital again be allowed to receive its five 
per cent share of the cooperative program to retire the $60,000 debt assumed 
directly by the Board of Trustees of the hospital and to keep up the equip- 
ment from year to year necessary to provide this enlarged service. 

Your Board of Trustees, administrative officers, nurses, and medical staff 
are daily coordinating their efforts in a program of Christian service to the 
sick and afflicted. We realize that our primary duty in the Convention pro- 
gram is the judicious administration of the affairs of the hospital. On the other 
hand, we are anxious at all times to make a contribution to the general wel- 
fare of all of our denominational activities. It is our hope that working to- 
gether we may continue to go forward. 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 

For Nine Months Period Ending 9-30-43 

Cash Income for Period $399,745.83 

Less Expenses: Actual 

Per Patient Day Amount 

Budget Actual Expended 

Administration $.29 $.29 $18,425.14 

Dietary 1.50 1.34 84,715.83 

Laundry 25 .24 14,848.19 

Housekeeping 28 .35 22,355.62 

Plant Operation. 37 .37 22,686.50 

Medical and Surgical Supplies 26 .27 17,466.25 

Record Room 13 .12 7,276.32 

Nursing Service 1.33 1.17 73,679.58 

Resident Staff 12 .11 7,019.39 

Anesthesia Department 15 .14 8,495.69 



Annual of Session 1943 121 



Oxygen 02 

Pharmacy and Drugs 26 

X-Ray 24 

Laboratory 12 

Blood Bank 



02 


1,158.78 


24 


15,195.80 


27 


17,423.27 


16 


10,472.85 


03 


1,907.10 



Total In-Patient Costs $5.32 $5.12 $323,126.31 

Add: 

Equipment $.08 $.12 $ 7,580.12 

Out-Patient Clinics 05 .05 2,976.40 

Rent, Interest, Refunds 10 .10 6,302. 55 

Denominational Activity 10 .10 6,366.13 



Total Expenditures for Period $5.65 $5.49 346,351.51 



Cash Gain for Period $ 53,394.32 

Less: Amount that should be set aside for depreciation 

9/12ths of 2.5% of $734,063.37 cost of buildings $ 13,763.61 

9/12ths of 10% of $225,202.77 cost of equipment 16,890.30 



$ 30,653.91 
Less New Equipment during year 7,580.12 



Net Necessary Depreciation Reserves 23,073.79 

Remaining Gain for Period $ 30,320.53 



COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS 
For Period 1933 through 1943 

Number Number Number Average Average 

of of of Free Patients Stay Per 

Year Patients Patient Days Patient Days Per Day Patient 

1933 2,551 21,778 8,953 59 8.5 

1934 3,087 25,096 9,274 68 8.3 

1935 3,652 31,881 14,206 87 8.7 

1936 3,798 34,564 13,404 94 9.1 

1937 4,032 35,322 12,603 96 8.7 

1938 3,843 37,692 11,588 103 9.8 

1939 4,082 39,847 9,990 109 9.7 

1940 4,038 42,967 14,496 117 10.6 

1941 4,024 45,983 15,347 126 11.4 

1942....... 7,030 72,783 22,671 191 10.3 

1943* 7,636 84,156 25,904 232 11.0 

Total Cost Per Church Cost of 

Year Expended Patient Day Donations . Charity 

1933 $86,660.29 $3.98 $13,333.35 $35,632.94 

1934 102,211.10 4.06 17,165.61 37,652.44 

1935 123,721.91 3.88 19,921.13 55,119.28 

1936 132,785.54 3.84 21,563.40 51,171.36 

1937 147,835.80 4.18 26,658.55 52,680.54 

1938 156,457.50 4.50 24,307.63 52,146.06 

1939 165,058.96 4.65 26,540.21 46,453.50 

1940 183,882.76 4.29 25,491.78 62,187.84 

1941 225,642.24 5.45 33,590.77 83,641.15 

1942 369,943.40 5.64 46,728.18 104,971.81 

1943* 462,330.36 5.65 66,940.75 136,248.24 

*Estimated — Based on actual for first nine months. 



122 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

100. 

VI. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

A. DIVISION OF RECEIPTS 

We need to be reminded of the following facts : 

The total income of the Convention for Missions, Education and Benevolence 
during 1943 will be approximately $1,400,000. Of this amount about $250,000 
will be for the Orphanage, which of course is not included in the Cooperative 
Program. Of the balance, $1,150,000, $600,000 will be for the Undesignated 
Cooperative Program. In other words, apart from the Orphanage, our desig- 
nations will amount to almost as much as the undesignated funds. If, how- 
ever, the plans suggested elsewhere in this report are fulfilled, it will mean that 
in 1945 we shall need no special offering for the Wake Forest chapel nor for 
the Hundred Thousand Club. Therefore, we can concentrate on the Un- 
designated Cooperative Program; and we should think in terms of not less 
than $1,000,000 undesignated in 1945. 

For 1944 the Board believes that we should divide the undesignated funds 
sixty per cent for State objects and forty per cent for Southern Baptist Con- 
vention objects, but in doing so it ought to be determined that beginning with 
1945 the undesignated funds are to be divided fifty per cent for State objects 
and fifty per cent for Southern Convention objects. 

B. THE HUNDRED THOUSAND CLUB 

In January and February a concerted effort ought to be made to get 
10,000 members of the Hundred Thousand Club for one year. If this can be 
done there can be no doubt that all our debts can be lifted in 1945. Looking 
toward this end, the Board believes the General Secretary and all those con- 
nected with the agencies of the Convention to promote during the last six 
months of 1944 an intensive effort to get all our churches to provide for the 
most complete Every Member Enrollment we have ever had. This will, of 
course, include Stewardship Revivals, Schools of Missions, etc. 

In this way we can build up a great Cooperative Program and still pro- 
vide for certain special days. Until the present program of North Carolina and 
the Southern Baptist Convention is changed, we should think of these special 
days as a part of the Baptist program, but not, technically speaking, a part 
of the Cooperative Program. The schedule of these special days follow: 

Home and Foreign Missions — Some Sunday in March 

Hospital — Mother's Day in May 

State Missions — Last Sunday in October 

Orphanage— Thanksgiving 

101. 

VII. THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

(Owned jointly by the Baptist Sunday School Board 

of the Southern Baptist Convention and the 

General Board of the Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina.) 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Manager 

The purpose of the Baptist Book Store is to serve North Carolina Baptists 
with the best in books and supplies needed for every department of the church, 



Annual of Session 1943 123 

and to encourage the reading of more and better books in the homes of our 
denomination. All books, Bibles, and supplies are sold strictly at publishers' 
prices, at a fair percentage of profit, which is divided equally between the 
Baptist Sunday School Board and the North Carolina Mission Board and is 
used for general mission purposes. Since ours is the only denominational book 
store in the state, a great many books and supplies are sold to people and 
churches of other denominations. 

Net sales for the year ending December 31, 1942, amounted to $97,753.18, 
an increase of $24,882.91, or 34% over 1941. (This is an interesting com- 
parison with the sales ten years ago, 1932, which amounted to only $27,992.28.) 
The sales turned over the inventory four times. 

Write for free catalogues. 

102. 

VIII. THE NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HISTORICAL 

COMMISSION 

G. W. Paschal, Chairman 

The commission again reports a year of progress. Volumes II and III 
of the History of Wake Forest College, by G. W. Paschal, are just now com- 
ing from the press. Beginning with 1865 they bring the history of the College 
down to date with considerable fullness of detail. The history is published 
by Wake Forest College, and the new volumes, as well as Volume I covering 
the period from 1834 to 1865, may be ordered from Mr. E. B. Earnshaw, 
Bursar, Wake Forest, North Carolina, at $2.00 a volume postpaid. 

It is expected that another volume of the History of North Carolina Bap- 
tists will be ready for the press within the year. 

Valuable additions to the Baptist collection in the Wake Forest College 
Library continue to be made, although the interest of many of its friends has 
been absorbed in the war. The clerks of most of the associations are faithful 
to send for the collection their current minutes, and sometimes the minutes 
of earlier years ; many other minutes and valuable pamphlets are received from 
the office of Secretary Huggins and the Biblical Recorder; the latter is con- 
tributing also the numbers of Southern Baptist papers that come to that office. 
Friends in other states are also regularly collecting and sending to the collec- 
tion current minutes of the associations and conventions of the states in which 
they live. Sometimes the library secures by purchase such valuable items as 
the notebook of Mr. William Hooper, once president of Wake Forest College, 
for the years 1860-1862. The collection is at all times available for the use 
of those interested in any phase of our denominational life and history. 

103. 

IX. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC. 

Theodore S. Johnson, Secretary 

On September 25, 1943, the North Carolina Baptist Foundation was ad- 
ministering trust funds in the total amount of $166,121.39, which includes 
$3,238.34 of cash income received and not yet expended to beneficiaries as of 
the date of this report. 

The assets of the Foundation and the changes made in each classification 
during the past year are as follows : 



124 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Real Estate $ 23,279.02 $ 968.44 Decrease 

Building and Loan Stock 10,800.00 2,000.00 Decrease 

Preferred- Stock 16,588.50 5,190.00 Increase 

Miscellaneous Bonds 49,587.23 12,926.56 Increase 

Notes Secured by- 
Deed of Trust (4%) 12,077.80 3,644.45 Increase 

Notes Secured by 

Deed of Trust (4^4%) 1,000.00 No change 

Notes Secured by 

Deed of Trust (4^%) 11,528.40 5,091.66 Decrease 

Notes Secured by 

Deed of Trust (5%) 10,005.18 10,741.68 Decrease 

Notes Secured by 

Deed of Trust (6%) 10,200.00 1,655.00 Decrease 

Common Stock 12,713.54 2,922.50 Increase 

Cash Principal Balances 5,103.38 3,189.55 Increase 

Cash Income Balances 3,238.34 160.22 Increase 

$166,121.39 $ 7,576.50 Increase 

The total gross income from these funds amounted during the fiscal year 
to $6,048.35. Of this amount $5,210.33 was paid over to various beneficiaries. 
The following items of expenses were paid: 

Taxes $214.31 

Repairs 109.95 

Insurance 35.88 

General Administration 15.99 



The total fee collected by the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company for 
their services as fiscal agent amounted to $301.67. This was computed on the 
basis of 5 per cent of the actual income produced. The operations involved 
in making changes in investments, collection of income, management of real 
estate and many other duties of the fiscal agent make this charge very small 
in comparison with the work and responsibilities involved. 

The trust funds of the Foundation are arranged in groups according to 
the purposes for which the trusts were established. The list of funds and the 
names of the donors are given below : 



No. Fund 

8900 General 

8901 Aged Ministers' Relief 



8902 Mills Home 



8903 Roanoke Association 

8904 Church Buildings 

Roanoke Association 

8905 Ministerial Association 

8906 Baptist Hospital 





Total 


Gross 


Donors 


Assets 


Income 


T. B. Parker 


$ 4,372.34 


$ 100.75 


Noah Biggs 


56,645.62 


2,278.00 


Nannie L. McLean 






W. D. Adams 






P. D. Camp 






W. O. Johnson 






W. L. Carter 


33,380.53 


1,758.39 


Ida Y. Rogers 






O. L. Pittman 






Henrietta S. Jarman 






Noah Biggs 


3,800.00 


240.61 


Noah Biggs 


5,000.00 


185.00 


Noah Biggs 


2,212.94 


95.74 


W. L. Carter 


1,800.00 


None 



8,325.78 


303.75 


2,424.19 


75.52 


7,410.06 


317.26 


735.88 


17.50 


1,000.00 


29.25 


2,497.50 


90.28 


5,481.59 


213.84 


2,922.50 


None 


1,500.00 


None 


8,341.72 


None 



Annual of Session 1943 125 

8907 State Missions D. P. Bridges 14,837.24 152.46 

Y. M. Whisenunt 
Margaret McDade 
H. C. Bridger 

8908 Meredith College Henrietta S. Jarman 4,933.50 190.00 

Student Loan Fund 

8909 Mills Home and Missions G. H. Church 

8910 Gethsemane Baptist Church O. L. Pittman 

8911 Christian Education P. D. Camp 

8912 Boiling Springs Educ. Fund D. P. Dellinger 

8913 General D. P. Bridges 

8914 State Missions O. L. Pittman 

8915 W.M.U. Scholarship 

In Memory of 
Mrs. Edna R. Harris 

8916 Clement Baptist Church John E. Briggs 

8917 Medical Department Dr. Wayland Mitchell 

Wake Forest College 
Cash Balances 

Totals $166,121.39 $6,048.35 

The following table will show for the past five years the yield on the 
total fund and on the assets after deducting unproductive Real Estate. In 
view of the unsettled financial conditions during this five year period and the 
general tendency towards lower rates of interest, the return on the funds of 
the foundation can be considered very satisfactory. Some of the investments 
have been transferred directly by the donors to the Foundation and some were 
included in the assets of estates. 



WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

FISCAL AGENT 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Statement Showing Income for Period September 25, 1938 

to September 25, 1943 



Income 

* Assets Collected 

Per Annual Report of 9-25-39 $145,658.81 $8,467.11 

Do 9-25-40 146,040.69 7,040.14 

Do 9-25-41 148,398.90 6,526.53 

Do 9-25-42 155,466.77 6,023.18 

Do 9-25-43 162,883.05 6,033.50 



Gross 


Income 


Annual 


Paid to 


** Yield 


Beneficiaries 


% 


or Invested 


5.8% 


$7,938.00 


4.8% 


6,200.00 


4.4% 


5,340.00 


3.9% 


4,620.00 


3.7% 


5,210.33 



Annual Average for Period . . $151 ,689.64 $6,818.09 4.5% $5,861.67(3.9%) 

Yield on Assets after deducting Unproductive Real Estate 

Per Annual Report of 9-25-39 $130,721.32 6.5% 

Do 9-25-40 133,340.69 5.3% 

Do 9-25-41 135,698.90 4.8% 

Do 9-25-42 143,666.77 4.2% 

Do 9-25-43 151,083.05 4.0% 



Annual Average for Period .. $138,902.15 5.0% (4.2%) 

*Assets as shown include Real Estate, Securities, Notes and Uninvested Principal Cash, but do not 
include Income Cash Balances. 

**Yield based on Assets held in Accounts as of Annual Accounting dates. 



126 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The largest change in investments is found in the item of Miscellaneous 
Bonds, showing an increase of nearly Thirteen Thousand ($13,000.00) Dollars. 
This is largely in United States Bonds. The security of investment is very 
high, the rate of return is lower than for other investments, many of which are 
not now obtainable. The total amount now invested in United States Bonds is 
$31,599.43 divided as follows: 

2y 2 % Bonds $26,257.80 

2U% Bonds 2,535.94 

2 % Bonds 2,805.69 

A review of the reported figures discloses one new fund, established by 
Reverend John E. Briggs of Washington, D. C, the income of which will be 
expended for a church library or other needs of the Clement Baptist Church of 
Person County. 

In every Annual Report of the Secretary since 1941 there have appeared 
certain recommendations regarding the appointment by the Convention Board 
or by the Convention of a competent Field Agent for the Foundation. Nothing 
has yet been done about it, the various institutions which are, or might become 
beneficiaries of the Foundation appearing to prefer to finance separate cam- 
paigns. There can be no question that the Foundation offers an easy, sound and 
economical way to raise money and to provide for its safe investment and 
management. 

We renew this recommendation again confident that the Foundation has 
proven its worth and dependability and that there are large sources of revenue 
that are only waiting for the proper information and opportunity to become 
available to all agencies of the denominations. 

104. 

X. RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. That the division of undesignated funds as between State and Southern 
Baptist Convention objects be left to the decision of the General Board 
when it meets in January, with, however, the instruction to the Board to 
increase the percentage to Southwide funds if it is at all possible to do so; 
that the General Board be asked to divide the per cent allocated for State 
objects so as to properly safeguard our debt funding commitments and at 
the same time conserve and promote in the best manner possible all our work. 

2. That the Convention authorize a continuance of the work with our 
Negro and Indian brethren, and that the appropriations be made as generous 
as the income of the Convention will permit. 

3. That the work at Oteen, Samarcand, and at the three sanatoriums — 
Aberdeen, Black Mountain and Fayetteville — be continued ; and that with 
reference to Oteen the other states that have soldier-patients there be re- 
quested to continue the support they have been giving, due to the fact that 
the recognized Protestant chaplain now serving the hospital is a Baptist. 

4. That the Board be authorized to continue to work on the plan which 
will place in the field the best available man, whose duty it will be to solicit 
large contributions in the form of gifts, wills, living trusts, and insurance 
policies, for our several institutions and agencies ; and that all the institutions 
and agencies of the Convention be asked to cooperate, in so far as it is possible, 
with respect (1) to providing the salary and expenses, (2) to selecting the 



Annual of Session 1943 127 

man, and (3) to furnishing him with full information as to needs and prospects. 
Further, that the Board be authorized to consider combining the work outlined 
above with the Laymen's Work, since conceivably one man might be able to 
carry on in an effective way both activities. 

5. That we set as our aim for the year 1944 the sum of $1,250,000 for the 
Cooperative Program, undesignated and designated, including the Hundred 
Thousand Club ; and that we set a goal of $250,000 for the Orphanage, a total 
of $1,500,000. 

6. That in addition to an aggressive program all along the line there be 
a concerted effort on the part of all Convention forces to pay off all the debts 
in 1944 for which the Convention is responsible; that the present members 
of the Hundred Thousand Club be asked to continue their memberships for 
one more year, and that other members be sought in sufficient numbers to 
enable the Convention to get out of debt in 1944; that the goal for the 
Mother's Day offering be set at $150,000, with the understanding that the 
first $75,000 received shall be used for service patients at the Hospital, and 
that all monies received beyond that amount shall be used to liquidate the debt 
of the Hospital for which the Convention is responsible ; and that all the 
workers of the General Board be asked to join with the administration of 
the Hospital in achieving this goal. 

7. With reference to the erection of Wake Forest chapel, it is recommended 
that all individuals and churches who have made pledges be urged to pay 
them as soon as possible; and that churches be requested to place a worthy 
amount for the chapel in the 1944 budget. 

8. That we continue to place our main emphasis during 1944 on Worship 
and Evangelism ; that the program for former years be continued and en- 
larged; and that the general missionaries be instructed to give the last five 
months of the year to the promotion of the Cooperative Program in the churches 
through stewardship and enlistment. 

9. That the Board be authorized and empowered to set aside $5,500 for 
the use of the Allied Church League for the Abolition of Beverage Alcohol ; 
and that the Convention nominate 55 persons to be elected by the Board of 
Trustees as the Convention's representatives on the board of the League ; and 
that on some Sunday in February, preferably the last Sunday in the month, 
every pastor in the State be requested to give his people a message on tem- 
perance, and inform them of what is going on among the Christian people 
of the State to rid North Carolina of beverage alcohol. 



128 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT 

Executive Committee of the General Board, 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 
Gentlemen: — 

According to your instructions, we have audited the books and records of the Convention for the 
twelve months ended December 31, 1943, and in the following tabulations we show the Revenue and 
Expenses of the General Fund, together with all Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the other funds. 

Exhibit "A" shows the Revenue and Expenses of the General Fund, together with the distribution of 
the Revenue after paying expenses chargeable to the undesignated revenue, and Exhibit "N" is a sum- 
mary of the net debt of the Convention. 

All Cash Receipts were found to have been promptly deposited in the bank and Disbursements were 
found supported by cancelled checks, invoices, etc., and expenses were properly classified. Our examina- 
tion did not disclose any evidence of irregularities and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly 
handled and properly accounted for. 

Just below is a summary, not audited, but prepared from the reports of the various institutions, show- 
ing the total of all income for Convention objects for the calendar year 1943: 

INCOME FOR ALL CONVENTION OBJECTS 
Calendar Year 1943 

Undesignated - 3 591,882.43 

W. M. U. Specials 15,811.42 

Designated lor Hundred Thousand Club 99,416.72 

Designated for State Missions 88,756.47 

Designated for Foreign Missions 155,412.90 

Designated for Home Missions 40 , 913 . 03 

Designated for Ministerial Relief 2,815.91 

Designated for Ministerial Education 840.57 

Designated for Education — Convention Debt 818. 98 

Designated for North Carolina Hospital 69,341.02 

Designated for Current Support 3,077.00 

Designated for Wake Forest Chapel — Building Fund 34,465 .06 

Designated for American Bible Society 993.22 

Designated for Louisville Seminary 474.85 

Designated for Baptist Orphanage 298,457.31 

GRAND TOTAL 31 ,403 ,476.89 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. Allen and Company 
Certified Public Accountants 
Raleigh, N. C, February 7, 1944. 

REVENUE AND EXPENSES— GENERAL FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Revenue: 

From Churches— Undesignated 3591,882.43 

W. M. U. Funds Sent Direct — (See Contra in Disbursements) 15,811.42 

Total Revenue to Account for 3607,693.85 

Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue: 
Salaries Paid: 

General Secretary and Treasurer 35 , 700 . 00 

Bookkeeper 2,070.00 

Secretary.. 2,070.00 

Assistant Bookkeeper 1,020.00 10,860.00 

Travel Expense 741.89 

Office Rent 864.00 

Printing 707.54 

Postage 813.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 223.90 

Audits— General..... 600.00 

Supplies and Repairs 602.37 

Bond Premiums 150.00 

Compensation Insurance 169.20 

Expense Board and Committee Meetings 1,008.08 

Employees Retirement Fund 1,519.07 

Bank Service Charge 14.42 

Publishing Receipt 648 . 16 

3 18,921.63 
Promotion: 

Salaries 34,800.00 

Travel..... 1,355.80 

Associational Promotion 4,508.27 

Baptist Radio Hour 2,817.51 

Literature and Postage 231.95 

Meetings and Contingent 53.50 13,767.03 



Annual of Session 1943 129 

W. M. U. Department: 

Salaries 557,730.24 

Office Rent 648.00 

Printing and Postage 3,570.84 11,949.08 

Total Operating Expenses £44,637.74 

ADD: W. M. U. Funds Sent Direct (See Contra in Receipts) 15,811.42 60,449.16 

Distributable Balance — General Fund 55547, 244 . 69 

Distribution to Other Funds: 

State Missions 15.% 82,105.92 

North Carolina Hospital 5 . %, 27,368.63 

Southwide Objects 40.% 218,949.09 

Education — Ministerial Aid 1. % 5,473.75 

Ministers' Retirement Fund 2.% 10,947.46 

Education Convention Debt 23.% 125,770.14 

Education— Current Support 14.% 76,629.70 

Total Distribution to Other Funds 3547,244.69 



Exhibit "B" 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— STATE MISSIONS FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 

Designated Funds $ 78,170.45 

From Baptist Foundation 461.00 

From Baptist Sunday School Board 8,535.06 

For Salaries Pastors — Camp Areas 793 .00 

Rent McCullers Church 32.00 

Southern Baptist Churches for Oteen 764.96 

Total % 88,756.47 

ADD: Share of General Fund— 15% 82,105.92 

Total Receipts 55170,862.39 

Balance December 31, 1942 16,774.54 

Total to Account for .55187,636.93 

Disbursements: 
General 

Division of Sunday School: 
Salaries: 

Secretary 33,300.00 

Field Workers 3,750.00 

Stenographers 1,291.78 ? 8,341.78 

Travel 941.79 

Printing and Postage 459.87 

Rent 302.40 

Sunday School Convention 460.08 

Incidentals _. 260.48 

Special Associational Work 2,196.55 

Vacation Bible School 298.98 

Total Sunday School Work 55 13,261.93 

Division of Training Union: 
Salaries: 

Secretary 552,575.00 

Y. P. Workers 680.00 

Intermediate Workers 1,500.00 

Stenographer 1,410.00 55 6,165.00 

Travel 773.50 

Printing and Postage 713.38 

Rent 243.00 

Assembly 500.00 

Incidentals 204.03 

Special Associational Work 1, 723. 83 

Total Division of Training Union 10,322.74 

Division of Student Work: 

Salary— Student Secretary 55 2,400.00 

Salary — Stenographer 1, 199. 60 

Travel 477.31 

Retreats 353.46 

Rent 194.40 

Postage, Supplies and Incidentals 506.26 

Youth Revivals 19.14 

Printing Reveille 253.47 

Salary Secretary — Greensboro 993 . 39 



130 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Travel Incidentals and Upkeep 808.86 

Salary Secretary— E.C.T.C 1,416.00 

Travel and Student House 457.78 

Salary Secretary— A.S.T.C 1,150.00 

Travel and Incidentals 103.18 

Salary — Student Secretarv: 

Meredith College 296.77 

State College 462.78 

Duke Universitv 159.50 



Total Division of Student Work 11,251.90 



Total Department of Christian Education % 34,836.57 

Other State Mission Work: 

General Missionaries Salary and Travel $ 7,905.07 

Indian Work Salary and Travel 1, 677. 24 

Sanatoriums: 

Oteen 52,400.00 

W. N. C 410.00 

Samarcand Sanatorium 469.00 3,279.00 



Negro Convention 2,073.00 

Camp Work: 

Fayetteville 3,720.00 

Wilmington 2,880.00 

Jacksonville 2,195.82 

Carolina Beach 2,520.00 

General Personnel 1,454.19 

Equipment 939.52 13,709.53 



Church Building: 

Boone 1,500.00 

Cullowhee...- 404.67 

Roanoke Association 150.00 

Pullen Memorial 5,000.00 

Wilmington 9,879.27 

Jacksonville 147. 62 

Carolina Beach 2,415.94 

General 14,109.75 33,607.25 

Bibical Recorder— Current Support $ 7,113 .40 

Aid on Pastors' Salaries 25,504.17 

Workers for Temperance 2, 341. 42 

Associational Revivals 11 ,143 .67 

Miscellaneous: 

Pastors Schools and Conferences 1,752.76 

Annuity — Spilman Cottage 100.00 

Annuity and Repairs — Bridges Cottage 1,120.00 

Upkeep Chapel Hill Church 600.00 

Convention Minutes and Expense 1,837.94 

Salary and Expense Recording Secretary ._ 225.00 

Statistical Secretary 200.00 

Statistical Printing and Postage 691.87 

Expense State Mission Day 1,308.16 

Subscription to Biblical Recorder for 

Pastors 934.83 

Study of Rural Churches 284.86 

Movie Equipment 7.65 

Contingent 1,333 .62 

Preparation of Manuscript Historv of N. C. 

Baptists _ 600.00 



Total Miscellaneous 10,996.69 



Total Other State Mission Work 119,350.44 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS— STATE MISSIONS FUND 154,187.01 

BALANCE DECEMBER 31, 1943 33,449.92 

Total Accounted for 2187,636.93 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— MINISTERS' RELIEF FUND— SPECIAL 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

From Baptist Foundation $ 2,050.00 

Balance December 31, 1942 5,288.23 

Total to Account for $ 7,338.23 

Disbursements: 

Ad to Aged Ministers 3,075.00 

Balance December 31, 1943 4,263.23 g 7,338.23 

Total Accounted for 2 7,338.23 



Annual of Session 1943 131 

Exhibit "D" 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— EDUCATION— MINISTERIAL AID 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds and from Baptist Foundation $ 813.18 

ADD: Share of General Fund 1% 5,473.75 

Funds Direct (Contra in Disbursements) 27.39 

Total Receipts 3 6,314.32 

Balance December 31, 1942 1,765.72 

Total to Account for 3 8,080.04 

Disbursements: 

Paid to Wake Forest College $ 2,825.00 

Paid to Mars Hill College 1,060.00 

Paid to Wingate College 340.00 

Paid to Campbell College 530.00 

Paid to High Point College 90.00 

Paid to Gardner-Webb College 530.00 

Total $ 5,375.00 

ADD: Funds sent direct (Contra in Receipts) 27.39 

Total Disbursements $ 5,402.39 

Balance December 31, 1943 2,677.65 

Total Accounted for 3 8,080.04 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— EDUCATION CONVENTION DEBT 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds 3 818.98 

ADD: Share of General Fund 23% 125,770.14 

Apportionment Hundred Thousand Club 48,078.62 

Total Receipts 3174,667.74 

Balance December 31, 1942: 

Baptist State Convention 3 8,123.11 

Debt Service Fund 262.28 8,385.39 

Total to Account for 3183,053.13 



Disbursements: 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co. — Repayment 3124,500.00 

H. O. Gattis Note— Payment in full 14,000.00 

Mars Hill Note— Paid on Principal 2,200.00 

Paid to Trustees — Fruitland Institute 1,750.00 

Interest— Wachovia Bank and Trust Co 8,196.26 

Interest— H. O. Gattis Note 570.90 

Interest— Mars Hill Note 187.00 

Operating Expenses: 

Audit Debt Service Fund 35.00 

Safe Deposit Box Rental 30.00 

Gift to Mars Hill College 15.00 

Total Disbursements 3151,484.16 

Balance December 31, 1943: 

Baptist State Convention 3 31,197.23 

Debt Service Fund 371.74 31,568.97 

Total Accounted for 3183,053.13 



Exhibit "F" 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 

Designated Funds 3 19,963.30 

ADD: Share of General Fund 5% 27,368.63 

3 47,331.93 
ADD: Funds sent direct (See Contra in Disbursements) 49,377.82 

Total Receipts 96,709.75 

Balance December 31, 1942 4,024.15 

Total to Account for 3100,733.90 



132 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Disbursements : 

For North Carolina Hospital — Designations and Payments on Notes 

and Interest . 47,865.69 

F„unds Sent Direct (See Contra in Receipts) 49,377.82 

Total Disbursements 97, 243. SI 

Cash Balance December 31, 1943 3,490.39 

Total Accounted for 3100,733.90 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— MINISTERS' RETIREMENT FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1942 
Receipts: 

Share of General Fund 2% 3 10,947.46 

Balance December 31, 1942 3,490.34 

Total to Account for 3 14,437.80 

Disbursements: 

Conventions Share of Retirement Fund 3 6,174.60 

Salary— Bookkeeper 1,530.00 

Promotion of Plan 1,054.10 

Bond Premium 17.50 

Supplies, Printing, Postage, etc 342 . 81 

Payment on Adding Machine 101.97 

Total Disbursements 3 9,220.98 

Balance December 31, 1943 5,216.82 

Total Accounted for.. 3 14,437.80 

Exhibit "H" 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— WAKE FOREST CHAPEL BUILDING FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designations 3 34,465.06 

Loans — Wachovia Bank and Trust Co 65,000.00 

Total 3 99,465.00 

Overdraft December 31, 1942 5,181.47 

ADD: Transfer of Unexpended Balance Current Support 12-31-43 by 

order of Executive Committee 2,234.31 

Total to Account for 3 96,517.90 

Disbursements: 

To Treasurer Wake Forest Chapel Fund 3 71, 23 7. 50 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co. — Repayments on Principal of Loans 30,000.00 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co. — Interest 635.41 

W. H. Moore, Salary, Rent and Travel 3,628.75 

O. T. Binkley— Travel 51.30 

Supplies Printing and Postage 168.76 

Total Disbursements 3105,721.72 

Overdraft December 31, 1943 9,203.82 

Total Accounted for 3 96,517.90 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designations 3 993.22 

Balance December 31, 1942 None 

(Included in Foreign Missions Fund) 

Total to Account for 3 993.22 

Disbursements: 

Remitted to American Bible Society 3 799.37 

Balance December 31, 1943 193.85 

Total Accounted for 3 993.22 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— CURRENT SUPPORT 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designations 3 3,077.00 

ADD: Share of General Fund- 14% 76,629.70 

Total to Account for 3 79,706.70 



Annual of Session 1943 133 

Disbursements: 
Current Support: 

Meredith College 3 20,000.00 

Wake Forest College 20,000.00 

Campbell College 12.500.00 

Mars Hill College 15,000.00 

Chowan College 388.34 

Wingate College 7,015.00 

Audits Institutions 2, 000 . 00 

Expense Fruitland Institute 45.18 

Expenses — Education Commission 523.87 

Total Disbursements 3 77,472.39 

Balance Unexpended 12-31-43 .... $ 2,234.31 

transferred to Wake Forest Chapel Building Fund by Order of 

Executive Committee (See Exhibit "H") 2, 234 . 3 1 

Total Disbursements and Transfer $ 79,706.70 

Balance December 31, 1943 None 

Total Accounted for $ 79,706.70 

Exhibit "K" 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 

Designations: 

Hundred Thousand Club— 50% 3 56,511.35 

Home Missions 40,913.03 

Ministerial Relief— Regular 765 . 91 

Foreign Missions 128, 876. 45 

£227,066.74 

ADD: Foreign Mission Fund — Sent Direct 26,536.45 

(See Contra in Disbursements) 

Total ?253,603.19 

ADD: Share of General ¥aad-A0% 218,949.09 

Total Receipts..,. 3472,552.28 

ADD: Louisville Seminary 474.85 

Total 3473,027.13 

Balance December 31, 1942 81,328.84 

Total to Account for 3554,355.97 

Disbursements: 

Paid on Cooperative Program 3217,642.49 

Paid on Designations — Hundred Thousand Club 51 ,685 .46 

Foreign Missions: 

Paid on Designations 3119,391.83 

Funds sent Direct — Contra in Receipts 26,536.45 

E. P. Buxton— Treasurer 100.00 146,028.28 

Paid on Designations — Home Missions 40,160.60 

Paid on Designations — Ministers Relief 743.66 

Postage and Incidentals: 

Foreign Missions 3 112. 20 

Home Missions 194.86 307.06 

Louisville Seminary 398. 35 

3456,965.90 
Balance December 31, 1943 97,390.07 

Total Accounted for 3554,355.97 



Exhibit "L' 



BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCORPORATED 
CURRENT FUND INCOME AND EXPENSE 
Year Ended December 31, 1943 
Income: 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W. M. S— Cash 3287,754.45 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W. M. S.— Clothing 1,785.36 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W. M. S — Food 8,917.50 

Individuals — Cash 18,469.05 

Interest — Endowment and Trust Funds 19,365.44 

Dividends, Rent and Interest 2,706.01 

The Duke Endowment 13,586.53 

Profit from Print Shop and Charity and Children 4,274.42 3356,858.76 



134 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Expense: 

Maintenance Cost: 

At Mills Home J160.761.80 

At Kennedy Home 64,566.71 

Extra Institutional Service — Mills Home 9 , 847 . 66 

Extra Institutional Service — Kennedy Home 1,324. 10 

Annuities Paid 4,645.28 

J241.145.5S 

Excess of Income Over Expense 2115,713.21 



BAPTIST ORPHANGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCORPORATED 
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION 
December 31, 1943 
Assets ; 

Plant and Equipment— Capital Fund 3758,980. 65 

Current Fund — Cash — Accounts Receivable — Inventories 287,998.33 

Endowment Funds — Cash — Land — Mortgages — Bonds 713 ,497 . 73 

31,760,476.71 

Liabilities None 

Net Worth .31,760,476.71 



Exhibit "M" 
BIBICAL RECORDER BUILDING FUND- 
AUDITED CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Calendar Year Ended December 31, 1943 
Receipts: 
Rents: 

Baptist State Convention 3 2,251.80 

Baptist Book Store 1,350.00 

Bibical Recorder 604.80 

Bynum Printing Co 3,240.00 

Kings Bindery 540.00 

Total Rents 3 7,986.60 

Baptist Book Store— Profit 1943 11,152.63 

Total Receipts 19,139.23 

Balance January 1, 1943 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Raleigh, N. C 1,058.78 

Total to Account for 3 20,198.01 



Disbursements: 

Operation of Building: 

1943 City and County Taxes 3 383.04 

Insu ranee 86. 99 

Lights and Water 544.97 

Fuel and Heat 371.37 

Supplies 112.01 

Repairs 328.32 

Remodel Boiler Room 1,746.29 

J anitors — Salary 1,3 74. 00 

Relief and Annuity Board 40.32 

Total Operation of Building 3 4,987.31 

Loan — Wachovia Bank and Trust Co.: 

Payments on Principal 3 13,500.00 

Payments on Interest 1,590.00 

Total Disbursements for Year 3 20, 077 . 3 1 

Balance December 31, 1943 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Raleigh, N. C 120.70 

Total Accounted for -3 20,198.01 



STATEMENT OF PRESENT FINANCIAL CONDITION 
December 31, 1943 
Liabilities: 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co.— Note Payable 3227,500.00 

Note Payable— Mars Hill College 3,300.00 

Fruitland Institute — Claims Guaranteed 1,750.00 

Biblical Recorder Building Fund Loan 31,500.00 

North Carolina Hospital Building Fund — Notes: 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Raleigh, N. C 3 62,000.00 

Security National Bank, Winston-Salem 24,400.00 86,400.00 

Due to Southwide Objects 87,241.13 

Total Liabilities .3437,691.13 



Annual of Session 1943 135 

Assets Available: 

Cash in Bank December 31, 1943: 

Baptist State Convention 3168,675.34 

Baptist State Convention — Debt Service Fund 371.74 

Biblical Recorder Building Fund 120 . 70 

Total Available Assets ^169,167.78 

Net Amount of Debt December 31, 1943 8268,523.35 



BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1943 
Assets: 
Current: 

Cash in Bank 3 None 

Petty Cash 10.00 

Returned Checks 19.11 

Accounts Receivable 3 13,314.84 

Less: Reserve for Doubtful None 13,314.84 

Merchandise Inventory.. 18,541.90 

Total Current Assets 3 31,885.85 

Fixed: 

Furniture and Fixtures 3 3,640.29 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 2,316.35 

Book Value of Fixed Assets 3 1,323.94 

Total Assets 3 33,209.79 

Liabilities and Net Worth: 

Liabilities 3 None 

Net Worth 33,209.79 

Total Liabilities and Net Worth 3 33,209.79 

Operating Income: 

Sales 3142,802.76 

Less: Returns and Allowances 3 7,015.46 

Excise Tax 205.25 

N. C. Sales Tax.... 1,379.83 8,600.54 

Net Sales 3134,202.22 

Cost of Sales: 

Inventory January 1, 1943 3 16,123.51 

Purchases Current Year.. 87,031.97 

Freight and Express 1 ,620.34 

Total 3104,775.82 

Less: Inventory December 31, 1943 18,541.90 

Cost of Sales 86,233.92 

Gross Profit on Sales ... 3 47,968.30 

Operating Expenses: 

Salaries 3 9,145.75 

Rent.. 1,350.00 

Advertising 3,101.59 

Postage 3,313.23 

Travel Expense 192.65 

Insurance 258.08 

Telephone and Telegraph 185.39 

Printing, Supplies and Stationery 1,040.72 

Depreciation 210. 95 

General Expense 900.74 

Total Operating Expenses 3 19,699.10 

Operating Profit 3 28,269.20 

Other Income: 

Recoveries on Bad Debts 69.63 



Operating Profit and Other Income 3 28,338.83 



136 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Other Deductions: 

Bad Accounts Charged Off 3 62.42 

Bank Service Charges 140.92 

Accounts Receivable Adjustment 208 . 06 

Total Deductions 411.40 

Net Profit for the Year _$ 27,927.43 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITALS, INCORPORATED 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION 
December 31, 1943 
Assets: 

Cash— Current Fund $ 21,997.28 

Cash— Plant Fund.-- 2,684.09 $ 24,681.37 

War Bonds — Current Fund 56.25 

Accounts Receivable — Net 29,861.33 

Due from Duke Endowment 26,889.00 

Inventories 18,472.59 

Prepaid Insurance 1, 209 . 07 

Securities — Endowment Fund 2, 222 .01 

Land, Buildings and Equipment — Less Reserves 884,474.11 

Total Assets .. .2987, 865. 73 

Liabilities: 

Mortgage Payable— Plant Fund 2 60,000.00 

Capital! 

Current Fund $ 98,485.52 

Plant Fund 827,158.20 

Endowment Fund 2,222.01 3927,865. 73 

Total Liabilities and Surplus 2987,865.73 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITALS, INCORPORATED 

OPERATING STATEMENT 

Year Ended December 31, 1943 

Gross Income From Patients 2594,046.34 

6 Charity Work 3138,511.02 

Ministerial and Courtesy Allowances 6,998.74 

Insurance and Professional Allowances 9,907.17 

Bad Debts— Charge-Offs 10,009.03 

Reserved for Uncollected , 16,548.10 181,974.06 

Net Income from Patients 2412,072.28 

Patient Expenses: 

Administration 2 24 , 791 . 42 

Dietary 117,599.45 

Laundry... 20,078.25 

Housekeeping 35, 054 . 63 

Plant Operation 32,109.82 

Medical and Surgical _ 57,497.42 

Pharmacy 18,353.80 

Nursing .. 92,360.99 

X-Ray 23,436.76 

Laboratory - 14,838.78 

Out-Patient Clinics 4,254.56 

Depreciation — Building and Equipment 42,484.62 482,860.50 

Excess of Patient Expense Over Patient Income 2 70,788.22 

Non-Patient Income: 

Religious Contributions 2 72,584.08 

Duke Endowment 26,899.00 

Individuals 5, 224. 25 

Government Contributions 26, 322. 17 

Non-Hospital Income 2, 877. 85 

Endowment Income 52.53 

Total Non-Patient Income.. 2133,959.88 

Non-Operating Expense: 

Equipment 2 18,718.44 

Interest and Rent 7,696.13 

Non-Hospital 9,119.28 

Transferred to Endowments 666.33 36,200. 18 

Excess Non-Patient Income Over Non-Patient Expense . 97,759.70 

Surplus Increase for Year 2 26,971.48 

Respectfully submitted, A. T. ALLEN & COMPANY 
Raleigh, N. C, February 7, 1943 Certified Public Accountants. 



STATISTICS 
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173 



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209 



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Annual of Session 1943 



21! 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF ALL ASSOCIATIONS 



Associations 



Baptisms 



Number 

of 
Churches 



Church 
Member- 
ship 



Total 
Denomi- 
national 
Contribu- 
tions 



Total Local 
Church Con- 
tributions 
(Pastor's 
Salary, etc.) 



Grand 

Total 

(Add Last 

Two 
Columns) 



Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Atlantic 

Avery 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Blue Ridge 

Brier Creek 

Brunswick 

Brushy Mountain 

Buncombe 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell , 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Central 

Chowan 

Columbus 

Dock t ___ 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Gaston County 

Green River 

Haywood 

Johnston 

Kings Mountain 

Liberty 

Little River 

Macon County 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mount Zion 

Neuse 

New Found 

New South River 

Pee Dee 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Raleigh 

Randolph 

Roanoke 

Robeson 

Rowan 

Sandy Creek 

Sandy Run 

South Fork 

South Mountain 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain 

Stony Fork 

Surry 

Tar River 

Tennessee River 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Tuckaseigee 

Union 

West Chowan 

West Liberty 

Western North Carolina. 

Wilmington 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



275 
28 
105 
213 
90 
78 
188 
125 
160 
246 
91 
294 
601 
399 
350 
311 
302 
319 
352 
397 
77 
197 
159 
269 
279 
789 
320 
430 
416 
443 
322 
330 
271 
591 
230 
147 
765 
88 
141 
310 
296 
782 
840 
347 
272 
816 
385 
309 
395 
640 
478 
123 
312 
333 
68 
60 
309 
356 
272 
346 
139 
152 
316 
450 
104 
261 
261 
241 
147 



6,448 
500 

1 

4 

4 

2 

4 

3 

4 

6 

2 

6 
16 

7 

9 

9 

6 
11 
13 



617 
421 
648 
580 
983 
945 
410 
672 
030 
320 
815 
450 
530 
369 
561 
942 
406 
309 
250 

58 1 ; 
80'; 

751 
688 
966 
054 
831 
755 
357 
379 
059 
623 
324 
482 
307 
593 
396 
488 
872 
794 
850 
969 
379 
230 
201 
57'* 
735 
572 
654 
284 
167 
629 
978 
613 
191 
738 
840 
5'>7 
52') 
592 
654 
636 
951 
066 
645 
484 
574 



935.37 
609.14 
400.42 
867.53 
704.85 
657.40 
354.64 
248.66 
388.41 
653.79 
791.39 
868.99 
501.24 
515.79 
644.05 
511.40 
215.17 
934.70 
969.80 
572.65 
816.78 
555.06 
737.99 
582.24 
886.70 
409.59 
795.39 
696.93 
888.86 
252.33 
343.52 
594.64 
550.25 
227.50 
108.32 
362.21 
040.12 
586.02 
681.90 
280.63 
299.93 
578.39 
788.14 
881.63 
186.34 
720.36 
692.15 
819.57 
928.98 
528.17 
109.76 
513.52 
525.01 
867.47 
028.14 
708.59 
877.69 
541.27 
709.10 
145.87 
091.76 
643.12 
312.54 
960.58 
853.57 
617.97 
636.22 
559.45 
001.53 



30 
2 

10 

11 

62 

9 

40 

30 

35 

16 

14 

27 

164 

140 

114 

58 

85 

84 

92 

57 

6 

48 

23 

81 

22 

241 

41 

54 

59 

162 

67 

57 

20 

260 

27 

24 

351 

29 

11 

98 

72 

306 

284 

120 

49 

176 

101 

93 

64 

127 

121 

24 

87 

68 

4 

3 

43 

69 

17 

27 

18 

25 

52 

96 

7 

21 

128 

20 

13 



,309.89 
,861.97 
,204.40 
,695.05 
,138.46 
,956.48 
,216.06 
,590.04 
,902.98 
,633.67 
,974.33 
,705.70 
,400.31 
,319.45 
,841.33 
,224.25 
,944.68 
,688.39 
,645.93 
,271.04 
,294.20 
,859.76 
,087.74 
,428.52 
,339.77 
,646.49 
,507.07 
,438.42 
,519.68 
,452.08 
,414.82 
,813.17 
,548.56 
,466.70 
,938.42 
,936.87 
,519.62 
,247.16 
,142.44 
,581.13 
,687.62 
,881.71 
,361.20 
,000.99 
,851.88 
,791.55 
,433.32 
,632.71 
,235.34 
,648.31 
,396.03 
,496.06 
,881.06 
,101.30 
,938.94 
,147.12 
,836.92 
,360.77 
,422.85 
,515.04 
,884.09 
,405.14 
,926.30 
,530.32 
,775.61 
,639.59 
,192.68 
,282.76 
,985.39 



35 
3 
11 
14 

73 

11 

50 

39 

46 

19 

19 

33 

196 

172 

131 

69 

107 

131 

122 

75 

8 

67 

27 

96 

30 

305 

51 

69 

75 

232 

97 

78 

24 

326 

32 

31 

435 

37 

11 

124 

93 

399 

368 

154 

60 

232 

152 

110 

83 

153 

164 

27 

108 

85 

5 

4 

52 

93 

21 

33 

23 

29 

65 

146 

8 

25 

173 

26 

17 



,245.26 
,471.11 
,604.82 
,562.58 
,843.31 
,613.88 
,570.70 
,838.70 
,291.39 
,287.46 
,765.72 
,574.69 
,901.55 
.835.24 
,485.38 
,735.65 
,159.85 
,623.09 
,615.73 
,843.69 
,110.98 
,414.82 
,825.73 
,010.76 
,226.47 
,056.08 
,302.46 
,135.35 
,408.54 
,704.41 
,758.34 
,407.81 
,098.81 
,694.20 
,046.74 
,299.08 
,559.74 
,833.18 
,824.34 
,861.76 
,987.55 
,460.10 
,149.34 
,882.62 
,038.22 
,511.91 
,125.47 
,452.28 
,164.32 
,176.48 
,505.79 
,009.58 
,406.07 
,968.77 
,967.08 
,855.71 
,714.61 
,902.04 
,131.95 
,660.91 
,975.85 
,048.26 
,238.84 
,490.90 
,629.18 
,257.56 
,828.90 
,842.21 
,986.92 



Totals 21,308 



2,644 551,348 1,420 



19 5,033,949.63 6,454,818.82 



INDIAN ASSOCIATIONS— ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Burnt Swamp 


186 

58 


24 
12 


3,076 
1,051 


$ 2,923.31 
284.51 


$ 13,945.42 
1,609.38 


3 


16,868.73 
1,893.89 






Totals 


244 


36 


4,127 


3 3,207.82 


$ 15,554.80 


$ 


18,762.62 



218 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



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226 N. C. Baptist State Convention 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 

L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

This is my eighth annual report as Statistical Secretary. The associations 
began to meet in July and closed in November. These reports are based on 
the associational year, and the financial figures are not the same as those 
based on the calendar year reported by our Convention Treasurer. There 
are sixty-nine white associations and two Indian associations as associate 
members of the Convention. 

Even though we are in the midst of a world conflict such as none of us 
has ever experienced, we have had a marvelous year along every line. Com- 
paring figures for 1943 with those of 1942, and other years, in the matter of 
finances, we have the best record in the history of the Convention. Our gain 
in gifts to all objects during the year was $974,809.88 or 17.8 per cent. Our 
percentage of increase to benevolent objects was almost double what it was to 
local objects. 

Church Membership 

There are now 2,644 churches with a combined membership of 551,348. 
Last year we reported 2,609 churches with a membership of 537,680. This 
represents a gain of 35 churches and 13,668 members. There are 36 Indian 
Churches with a membership of 4,127. 

Baptisms 

During the year we received 21,308 members by baptism. This is a gain of 
1,766 compared with 1942 figures. The number of churches reporting no 
baptisms decreased from 629 to 608. Thirty-six Indian Churches reported 244 
baptisms, an increase of 103 compared with 1942 figures. 

Gifts 

Gifts to all missions, education and benevolences amounted to $1,420,869.19, 
which is a gain of $304,595.57 or 26.2 per cent. For all local work such as 
debts, buildings, fuel, lights, pastoral support and other operating expenses, 
the sum given was $5,033,949.63. This sum represents a gain over last year 
of $670,214.31 or 15.4 per cent. The total of all gifts to all causes was 
$6,454,818.82. As stated above the total increase in contributions to all causes 
was $974,809.88, or 17.8 per cent. 

Cooperating Churches 

The number of churches contributing to denominational objects was 2,537. 
This is an increase of 123 churches compared with last year. One hundred 
eight churches failed to give to one or more of the causes fostered by the Con- 
vention. Last year there were 195 churches that failed to give to one or more 

objects. 

Per Capita Gifts 

Per capita gifts to denominational objects for 1942 were $2.07, in 1943 
they were $2.58. Per capita gifts to local objects for 1942 were $8.11. In 
1943 they were $9.14. Per capita gifts to all objects, local and outside, for 
1942 were $10.19. In 1943 they were $11.17. 

Sunday Schools 

There are 2,644 churches of which 2,615 have Sunday Schools. Twenty- 
nine churches reported no Sunday Schools. There are 27 Mission Sunday 
Schools, making a total of 2,642 Sunday Schools with a membership of 402,244. 
This is a net gain of 33 Sunday Schools and a decrease of 1,519 members com- 
pared with last year's figures. This loss is not alarming when we consider the 
vast number of our young men and women who have been inducted into service 
and the thousands of others who are on defense jobs throughout the nation. 



Annual of Session 1943 227 

There are thirty-six Indian Schools with a membership of 3,687. The four 
churches reporting the largest Sunday School average attendance in the state 
are: 

Raleigh-Tabernacle 1058 

Charlotte— First 816 

Winston-Salem — First 806 

Greensboro — First 805 

Vacation Bible Schools 

The scarcity of gasoline and tires made it hard for rural churches to con- 
duct their school this time, but 615 reports have been received up to date. 
This is 34 below last year, but we expect more than that many reports to come 
in yet. The four associations that lead in the number of schools are : Mount 
Zion, 50 ; Pilot Mountain, 36 ; Little River, 25 ; and Roanoke, 23. 

Training Union 

Of the 2,644 churches in the State, 995 have some form of Training Union 
work reported as compared with 1,049 in 1942. Nine hundred thirty-six have 
a director supervising the work. The total number of units, Story Hour 
through Adult, this year is 3,260. In addition 9 Indian churches reported 13 
units of Training Union work. Ten thousand seven hundred and seventy 
training course awards were issued. 

Baptist Book Store 

The Baptist Book Store, under the management of Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, 
is located at Baptist Headquarters, first floor, of the Biblical Recorder Building, 
Raleigh. 

The Baptist Book Store is owned jointly by the Baptist Sunday School 
Board of Nashville, Tennessee, and the North Carolina Baptist State Con- 
vention ; and is operated as a convenience for North Carolina Baptists. It 
can furnish any book in print and all supplies needed for every Department 
of the church, except quarterlies, which must be ordered from Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Woman's Missionary Union statistical report runs from January 1 to De- 
cember 31, and 1943 reports cannot be compiled before this Annual of North 
Carolina State Convention goes to press. Therefore, the figures below are 
for 1942. 

In 1942 there were 3,917 organizations of Woman's Missionary Union re- 
porting. The roll is revised each year and when no report is sent during the 
year the organization is dropped from the roll until it does report. The mem- 
bership in these organizations totaled 84,728. Organized work was done in 
sixty-seven associations, sixty-five holding an annual meeting separate from 
the general association. Twelve hundred and nine organizations made one of 
the three points on the Standard of Excellence and 452 made all the ten 
points, being A-l. Three thousand one hundred sixty-one mission study 
classes were held, with 11,034 seals awarded. The 1942 Heck Memorial 
Offering was $8,376.00. 

Total contributions for the year were $387,728.60. 

Officers at present: Mrs. J. S. Farmer, President; Miss Mary Currin, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary ; Miss Ora Alford, Office Secretary and Treasurer ; Miss 
Kathryn Abee, Young People's Secretary. Offices 213-214 Biblical Recorder 
Building, Raleigh. 



228 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



Associations and Superintendents 



Number 
Societies 



Member- 
ship 



Alleghany — Mrs. A. O. Joines, Sparta 

Alexander — Mrs. Leach Gooden, Hiddenite 

Ashe — Mrs. H. D. Quessenberry, West Jefferson 

Atlantic — Mrs. L. B. Daniel, New Bern 

Avery — Mrs. R. T. Teague, Newland 

Beulah — Mrs. J. F. Funderburk, Roxboro 

Bladen — Mrs. W. F. Williamson, Elizabethtown 

Blue Ridge — Mrs. C. C. Parker, Marion. 

Brier Creek — Mrs. Richard Martip, Ronda 

Brunswick — Mrs. Martin B. Robbins, Winnabow 

Brushy Mountain' — Mrs. George Johnson, Wilkesboro 

Buncombe — Mrs. D. C. Martin, Asheville 

Burnt Swamp — Mrs. P. A. Underwood, Pembroke 

Cabarrus — Mrs. L. R. Crooks, Concord 

Caldwell — Mrs. C. A. Bowman, Granite Falls 

Carolina — Mrs. O. J. Smith, Hendersonville 

Catawba River — Mrs. W. L. McSwain, Glen Alpine 

Central — Mrs. C. F. Gaddy, Raleigh 

Cherokee 

Chowan — Mrs. C. T. Doughtie, Edenton 

Columbus — Mrs. Joe Edmund, Chadbourn 

Dock — Mrs. M. L. Mintz, Shallotte 

Eastern — Mrs. Grover Britt, Clinton 

Elkin— Mrs. C. N. Myers, Elkin 

Flat River — Mrs. Fred A. Phipps, Oxford 

French Broad — Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill 

Gaston — Mrs. M. L. Barnes, Gastonia 

Green River — Mrs. Z. M. Freeman, Rutherfordton 

Haywood — Mrs. H. G. Hammett, Waynesville 

Johnston — Mrs. J. E. Wilder, Raleigh 

King's Mountain — Mrs. John Wacaster, Cherryville 

Liberty — Mrs. Louis Gaines, Lexington 

Little River — Mrs. Charles Howard, Buie's Creek 

Macon — Mrs. J. G. Benfield, Franklin 

Mecklenburg — Mrs. B. S. Blanton, Charlotte 

Mitchell — Mrs. N. G. Pittman, Spruce Pine 

Montgomery — Mrs. C. B. Trammel, Troy 

Mount Zion — Mrs. George N. Harward, Chapel Hill 

Neuse — Mrs. C. M. Billings, Dudley 

New South River — Mrs. Lewis A. Gavin, Newton Grove. 

Pee Dee — Mrs. J. D. Nash, Hamlet 

Piedmont — Mrs. J. Ben Eller, Greensboro 

Pilot Mountain — Miss Ora Motsinger, Winston-Salem 

Raleigh— Mrs. J. E. Wilder, Raleigh 

Randolph — Mrs. Arthur Presnell, Ramseur 

Roanoke — Mrs. W. D. Joyner, Rocky Mount 

Robeson — -Mrs. J. G. Stephens, Orrum 

Rowan — Mrs. J. L. Kirk, Salisbury 

Sandy Creek — Mrs. E. A4. Harris, Aberdeen 

Sandy Run — Mrs. Ed Tedder, Ellenboro 

South Fork — Mrs. W. G. Bandy, Lincolnton 

South Mountain— Mrs. T. B. Hull, Vale 

South Yadkin— Mrs. W. H. Dodd, Mocksville 

.Stanly — Mrs. T. S. Crutchfield, Albemarle 

Stone Mountain— Mrs. Winfrey Luffman, State Road 

Surry — Mrs. W. A. Jackson, Mount Airy 

Tar River — Mrs. Ada S. Parker, Henderson 

Tennessee River — Mrs. E. H. Corpening, Jr., Tapoco 

Three Forks — Mrs. S. C. Eggers, Boone 

Transylvania — Mrs. S. F. McAuley, Brevard 

Tuckaseigee — Mrs. Chas. L. Allison 

Union — Mrs. Mark Hill, Marshville 

West Chowan — Mrs. W. E. White, Colerain 

West Liberty — Mrs. J. M. Patterson, Vests 

Western North Carolina— Mrs. J. V. Hall, Murphy 

Wilmington — Mrs. D. W. Merritt, Rocky Point 

Yadkin — Mrs. D. H. Craver, Boonville 

Yancey — Mrs. A. Z. Jamerson, Burnsville 



9 
11 

70 
8 
76 
33 
33 
5 
32 
29 
117 
48 
48 
41 
46 
38 
73 



Total. 



185 
70 
6 
82 
14 
82 
22 

102 
37 
41 
77 
99 
98 
65 
27 
95 
13 
21 

192 
44 
67 
73 

127 

131 
77 
51 

187 

143 
40 
75 
75 
99 
8 
60 
56 
5 
18 

119 
9 
22 
21 
18 
66 

198 
2 
22 
51 
34 
14 

3,965 



105 

260 

78 

1,222 
30 

1,208 
800 
597 
120 
375 
409 

1,704 
900 

1,020 
830 
800 
743 

1,939 



2,775 

1,079 

50 

1,550 

339 
1,610 

549 
2,036 

730 

872 
1,800 
2,630 



,066 

1,500 

500 

3,256 

174 

378 

4,850 

1,000 

945 

2,105 

2,700 

4,588 

1,925 

885 

5,317 

2,750 

960 

1,680 

1,768 

1,871 

133 

834 

1,129 

80 

1,000 

1,820 

120 

444 

363 

525 

1,168 

4,000 

15 

326 

1,700 

645 

136 



84,816 



Annual of Session 1943 229 

North Carolina Missionaries on Foreign Fields 

Appointed 

Mrs. Maude Burke Dozier, Hawaii 1906 

Mrs. Mary Bryson Tipton, Shanghai, China 1909 

Charles A. Leonard, Kweilin, China 1910 

J. B. Hipps, Shanghai, China 1913 

H. H. McMillan, Soochow, China 1913 

Mrs. Lulla Memory McMillan, Soochow, China 1913 

Miss R. Pearle Johnson, Shanghai, China 1915 

Miss Attie Bostick, Kweiteh, China 1916 

A. R. Gallimore, Waichow, China 1918 

J. C. Powell, Shaki, Africa 1919 

Mrs. Rosa Hocutt Powell, Shaki, Africa 1919 

Miss Alda Grayson, Laichowfu, China 1921 

Miss Naomi E. Schell, Tobata, Japan 1921 

Miss Katie Murray, Chengchow, China 1922 

John A. Abernathy, Tsiman, China 1924 

Mrs. Mattie Norman White, Chengchow, China 1924 

Frank T. M. Woodward, China 1924 

William B. Johnson, Soochow, China 1925 

Miss Marjorie Spence, Temuco, Chile 1925 

A. S. Gillespie, Kaif eng, China 1931 

Mrs. Pauline Pittard Gillespie, Kaif eng, China 1931 

Edwin B. Dozier, Hawaii 1933 

Mrs. Mary Wiley Dozier, Hawaii 1933 

Miss Elizabeth Hale, Shanghai, China 1934 

Shelby W. Vance, Yungchow, China 1935 

Miss Ruby Daniel, Budapest, Hungary 1935 

Lucius Bunyan Olive, China 1935 

Mrs. Nell Fowler Olive, China 1935 

William Dewey Moore, Rome, Italy 1937 

Miss Vivian Estelle Nowell, Nigeria, Africa 1938 

Lonnie Elwood Blackman, Hawaii 1938 

Mrs. Gladys Yates Blackman, Hawaii 1938 

Mrs. Mary Mills Dyer, Japan 1940 

Miss Viola Campbell, Mexico 1942 

Miss Estelle Councilman, Argentina 1943 

Many of these are home on enforced furlough. 



230 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



MINISTERIAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM 

NORTH CAROLINA AT OUR COLLEGES 

AND SEMINARIES 



BAPTIST BIBLE INSTITUTE 

New Orleans, La. 



Cline, Reeves, Belmont 
Deitz, Wayne C, Charlotte 
Gwyn, Charles E., Kernersville 
Hord, Richard W., Kings Mountain 
Hord, Mrs. Richard W., Kings 

Mountain 
Johnson, G. Emory, Marion 
Johnson, Mrs. G. Emory, Marion 
Kendrick, Bertie Lee, Spindale 
Kizer, John Ivan, Midland 
Kizer, Mrs. John Ivan, Wadeville 
Latham, Hughey, Greensboro 
Mclntyre, G. Lee, Kannapolis 
Mclntyre, Mrs. G. Lee, Kannapolis 



Matthews, Broadus H., Kings Moun- 
tain 
Matthews, Mrs. Broadus EL, Kings 

Mountain 
Menscer, Mary Lou, Kannapolis 
Parham, Joseph W., Kannapolis 
Stone, Thurman B., Erwin 
Stone, Mrs. Thurman B., Erwin 
Summey, Mack M., Black Mountain 
Summey, Mrs. Mack M., Black 

Mountain 
Talley, Frances, Greensboro 
Turner, A. Grace, Forest City 
Weatherly, Emma, Swannanoa 
Wyatt, J. D., Belmont 



BOILING SPRINGS JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Boiling Springs 



Auten, Charles, Gastonia 
Brooks, C. E., Gastonia 
Bumgardner, T. G., Shelby 
Bumgarner, D. L., Taylorsville 
Cline, J. T., Henry River 
Crapps, Robert W., Shelby 
Crawford, R. L., Boiling Springs 
Frye, Robert A., Drexel 
Hall, Millard F., East Marion 
Hastings, Matt L., Drexel 
Hill, William C, Gastonia 
Hughes, A. C, Shelby 
James, Lee A., Taylorsville 
Jenkins, Willard L., Lenoir 
Johnson, Guy E., Rutherfordton 



Kanipe, L. M., Boiling Springs 
Kendrick, Olen, Forest City 
Martin, Alonzo C, Forest City 
Mauldin, J. Howard, Charlotte 
Miller, Lawrence A., Lenoir 
Mull, Carl J., Morganton 
Norville, J. M., Spindale 
Ramsey, J. Welford, Valdese 
Rhinehardt, W. G., Gastonia 
Sheppard, Ralph, Canton 
Tate, H. M., Shelby 
Thomas, Leonard, Gastonia 
Whitesides, Jack, Spindale 
Whitesides, Harold, Rutherfordton 



CAMPBELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Buie's Creek 



Beasley, William Charles, Louisburg 
Gravitte, Johnnie C, Roxboro 
Melton, Thomas C, Winston-Salem 
Puckett, Joe Riley, Clayton 
Pulley, Odell, Youngsville 
Teeter, Junius, China Grove 



Vaden, Charles Francis, Raleigh 
Waddell, George, Buie's Creek 
Walker, Baxter Maye, Fayetteville 
Weaver, John Marshall, Lincolnton 
Young, Etheridge, Lexington 



MARS HILL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Mars Hill 



Barnes, Frances Marion, Spindale 

Beshears, Latt, Hickory 

Digh, William David, Lexington 

Green, Cardnes Hilliard, Canton 

Hall, E. J., Burnsville 

Honeycutt, Eddie Barron, Mars Hill 



Land, Clifton Edward, Lenoir 
Marshall, Ray M., Hendersonville 
Mclver, Bruce, Siler City 
Pegram, Jimmy, Greensboro 
Silvers, Joseph Samuel, Lenoir 
Wilson, Paul Nathaniel, Morganton 



Annual of Session 1943 



231 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Louisville, Ky. 



Allen, Charles Howard, Brevard 
Allen, William Lawson, Sylva 
Allred, Robert Dickens, Badin 
Andrews, Edwin Rudy, Mocksville 
Angell, John William, Mocksville 
Barnette, Henlee Hulix, Kannapolis 
Bass, Burnice G., Clinton 
Blackwelder, James Pierce, Pineville 
Blanchard, John Rountree, Gatesville 
Branch, Douglas M., Cary 
Brooks, Arthur Graham, Mooresboro 
Brookshire, Woodrow N., Taylors- 

ville 
Brown, Edward Pierce, Durham 
Cashwell, Thomas Leary, Jr., Gas- 

tonia 
Casner, James Grant, Charlotte 
Cheek, Aubrey Kenneth, Henderson- 

ville 
Christmas, Thomas Clinton, Charlotte 
Clyde, Dean Sylvester, Fair Bluff 
Compton, Carl Everett, Greensboro 
Crisp, James Allen, Jr., Brevard 
Crook, Roger H., Chapel Hill 
Cross, Charles C, Greensboro 
Deaton, Thomas Paul, Shannon 
Dedmond, Francis Berniel, Salisbury 
Early, Paul Davis, Winston-Salem 
Farrar, John Sherman, Jr., Gastonia 
Fulk, Thomas Jefferson, Mount Airy 
Glass, Victor Thomas, Spray 
Gordon, Lewis Howard, Monroe 
Grant, Worth Collins, High Point 
Guy, Thomas Sloane, Jr., Gatesville 
Hamby, Claude Howard, Marion 
Harris, Oscar Jacob, Valdese 
Hawkins, Harold Leighton, Gastonia 
Hicks, John Grason, Kings Mountain 
Highfill, William Lawrence, Winston- 
Salem 
Hinson, Jasper, Fair Bluff 
Holton, Billy Steed, Greensboro 



Huggins, Howard Brice, Tabor City 

Jackson, Bernice William, Oxford 

Jones, George Alexander, Saluda 

Jones, Tommie L., Spray 

Kirk, James P., Lewisville 

Lamm, Wilbur Clayton, Louisburg 

Lasater, Roberts Council, Durham 

Lennon, Samuel Judson, Wake Forest 

Long, Joe Mack, Severn 

Lovelace, Marc Hoyle, High Point 

Lovin, Austin, Greensboro 

McGee, John Sidney, Winston-Salem 

McManus, Harold Lynn, Sanford 

Middleton, Hubert Kinson, Yadkin- 

ville 
Moore, Guy Clayton, Spring Hope 
Moore, Oscar Daulton, Burlington 
Moore, Raymond Elsworth, Spring 

Hope 
Morgan, Enoch Sumpter, Mars Hill 
Oates, Wayne, Durham 
Perry, James Howell, Louisburg 
Poole, William Augustus, Dunn 
Potter, James S., Wilmington 
Prevatte, Archibald C, Lumberton 
Reese, Wilford William, Marion 
Rich, Thomas Lenwood, Jr., Garland 
Roberts, Ray Everett, Asheville 
Sodeman, Lowell Frazier, Wilson 

Mills 
Talley, Charles Odas, Greensboro 
Teague, Jarvis Wilson, Cave Creek- 
Terrell, William Isaac, Burlington 
Turner, James Lee, Charlotte 
Ussery, Benjamin B., Rockingham 
Wagoner, Walter R., Winston-Salem 
Walden, Henry E., Jr., Monroe 
West, William Franciscus, Roxboro 
Wood, Wyman E., Forest City 
Young, Richard Knox, Roxboro 
Zukor, Stephen Harry, Morganton 



SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seminary Hill, Texas 



Allen, James W., Kannapolis 
Ashley, J. Thaddious, Morrisville 
Baker, James E., Lumberton 
Bamberg, Mrs. Joe, Clinton 
Beasley, Barnard, Fayetteville 
Bell, Roger, Scotland Neck 
Bell, Mrs. Roger, Scotland Neck 
Bradley, Oren, Siler City 
Brewington, Harvie, Lumberton 
Campbell, Elizabeth, Hickory 
Ellis, Cline D., Spruce Pine 
Featherston, J. R., Cramerton 
Featherston, Mrs. J. R., Cramerton 
Nancock, Mary Ellen, Asheville 



Hare, Albertina, Apex 
Holmes, John D., Farmville 
Holmes, Mrs. J. D., Farmville 
Holt, Robert Le Roy, Asheville 
Ingram, Ray P., Asheville 
Jones, J. B., Morganton 
Jones, Mrs. J. B., Morganton 
McLean, M. R., Wilmington 
McLean, Mrs. M. R., Wilmington 
Martin, Davis C, Asheville 
Matheny, Essie, Mooresboro 
Newton, L. J., Dunn 
Ousley, John W., Lillington 
Peterson, Linwood, Leland 



232 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Simms, Stewart B., Raleigh 
Simms, Mrs. S. B., Raleigh 
Smith, Maisie, Morganton 
Teague, C. W., Smithfield 



Walker, S. Guy, Gastonia 
Walker, Mrs. S. G., Gastonia 
Woolweaver, L. M., Raleigh 
Woolweaver, Mrs. L. M., Raleigh 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Wake Forest 



Abrams, R. W., Rutherfordton 
Allgood, J. D., Jr., Winston- Salem 
Baker, Herbert M., Pikeville 
Beck, Gilmer J., Lexington 
Bennett, R. O., Jr., Wake Forest 
Bingham, Yates, Monroe 
Bishop, Fred E., Durham 
Bowen, C. F., East Durham 
Braswell, C. W., Princeton 
Brock, L. R., Jr., Wilson 
Bryan, F. B., Hope Mills 
Carroll, Chas., Jr., Clayton 
Chapman, C. D., Wake Forest 
Coates, Wm. Edward, Raleigh 
Collins, Vernon C, Forest City 
Conn, Aaron M., Louisburg 
Dilday, Herman T., Murfreesboro 
Edwards, L. R., Wake Forest 
Elliott, Morris, Toecane 
Farrar, Chas. W., Gastonia 
Glass, E. W., Sanford 
Grady, A. D., New Bern 
Greene, R. T., Wake Forest 
Harris, C. V., Morganton 
Hartsell, Bruce V., Franklinton 
Hawkins, L. F., Gastonia 
Hendrix, Wm., Cramerton 
High, Sam, Dallas 
Hobbs, J. D., Jr., Wilmington 
Hughes, R. L., Youngsville 
Jones, Miller T., Shelby 
Killian, Harold, Statesville 



Knight, Calvin, Leaksville 
Little, Thurston, Freeland 
McMillan, C. W., Whiteville 
Mattox, J. O., Wilson 
Moody, D. M., St. Pauls 
Newton, T. L., Raleigh 
Osborne, Mark R., Jr., Zebulon 
Badgett, W. W., Forest City 
Parham, Wallace E., Asheville 
Parham, Earl H., Rocky Mount 
Parrish, C. G., Zebulon 
Pitt, K. A., Roanoke Rapids 
Poston, E. E., Shelby 
Reece, T. L., Jonesville 
Royal, Peyton, Parkersburg 
Russell, E. P., Wake Forest 
Searight, David B., Washington 
Smith, J. Malbert, Winston-Salem 
Smith, L. C, Fuquay Springs 
Smith, Wm. P., Graham 
Smith, Wm. T., Reidsville 
Southard - , W. J., Leaksville 
Sparrow, B. B., Chapel Hill 
Thompson, Horace G., Louisburg 
Vinson, Wm. H., Jr., Woodland 
Walker, L. H., Raleigh 
Waters, C. S., Belmont 
Watson, E. C, Jr., Garland 
Wethington, L. E., Durham 
Whitaker, Bruce, Shelby 
Williams, T. C, Jr., Burlington 



WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

WlNGATE 



Baker, S. D., Kannapolis 
Bumgarner, A. B., Kannapolis 
Deese, Tommy, Monroe 
Fitzgerald, Ernest, Waxhaw 
Furr, W. T., Kannapolis 



Greene, Macon, Stony Fork 
James, R. C, Kannapolis 
Ray, J. C, Kannapolis 
Settlemyer, Z. W., Wingate 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION TRAINING SCHOOL 

Louisville, Ky. 



Adams, Evelyn, Conover 
Bland, Grace, Gastonia 
Brown, Ethel, Greensboro 
Childs, Margaret Jane, Lincolnton 
Gravitte, Ella Sue, Roxboro 
Hampton, Evelyn, Winston-Salem 
Hoots, Kathleen, Winston- Salem 
Ingle, Zubie, Statesville 
Joyner, Judith, Tabor City 
McCroskey, Ruby, Rockingham 



Mayo, Hilda, Rocky Mount 
Motley, Myra, Goldsboro 
Orr, Harriett, Charlotte 
Paschall, Louise, Reidsville 
Penny, Daphne, Raleigh 
Scarlett, Dora Page, Durham 
Swann, Julia, Statesville 
Terrell, Fannie, Burlington 
Terry, Gladys, Siler City 
Winstead, Frances, Farmville 



Annual of Session 1943 233 

EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS— CHURCH SECRETARIES- 
FINANCIAL SECRETARIES— YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
WORKER, AND MINISTERS OF MUSIC 

EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Name Church and Address 

Andrews, Miss Leah Eller Memorial Baptist Church, Greensboro 

Bates, Miss Katherine St. John's Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Barnes, Mrs. Beamer First Baptist Church, Thomasville 

Braswell, Miss Naomi First Baptist Church, Lumberton 

Burchett, Mr. Chas East Baptist Church, Gastonia 

Burns, Mrs. Ford A Tabernacle Baptist Church, Raleigh 

Chaney, Miss Wynona Temple Baptist Church, Durham 

Crandle, Mr. Paul Myers Park Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Easom, Mr. Horace B First Baptist Church, Shelby 

Everette, Mrs. J. R Blackwell Memorial Church, Elizabeth City 

Giddings, Mrs. Roy First Baptist Church, Durham 

Harris, Miss Helen E First Baptist Church, Morganton 

Hensley, Miss Ila First Baptist Church, Lexington 

Hodge, Mr. C. S First Baptist Church, Greensboro 

Humphrey, Miss Mary First Baptist Church, Asheville 

Jennings, Miss Mildred First Baptist Church, Williamston 

Lassiter, Miss Elizabeth First Baptist Church, Henderson 

McElrath, Mr. Hugh Western Avenue Baptist Church, Statesville 

Patrick, Miss Thelma First Baptist Church, High Point 

Porter, Miss Edna First Baptist Church, St. Pauls 

Posey, Miss Sarah South Lenoir Baptist Church, Lenoir 

Ray, Miss Sue Ellen First Baptist Church, Wilmington 

Rhinehart, Miss Dorothy First Baptist Church, Belmont 

Roberts, Miss Marie First Baptist Church, Elizabeth City 

Starnes, Miss Mable Ashboro Street Church, Greensboro 

Starnes, Mrs. Glenn Calvary Baptist Church, Asheville 

Stephens, Miss Sarah First Baptist Church, Hickory 

Thomas, Miss Mildred West Durham Baptist Church, Durham 

Timmerman, Miss Lucy M First Baptist Church, Hendersonville 

Wall, Mr. Woodrow Grace Street Baptist Church, Durham 

Washburn, Mrs. A. V First Baptist Church, Goldsboro 

Welch, Miss Lucille First Baptist Church, Gastonia 

White, Mrs. Phil E First Baptist Church, Leaksville 

Zentmeyer, Miss Myrtle First Baptist Church, Fayetteville 

CHURCH SECRETARIES 

Beardsly, Mrs. W. H Pritchard Memorial Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Blake, Mrs. Paul First Baptist Church, Lumberton 

Clark, Miss Beverly First Baptist Church, Shelby 

Coward, Mrs. S. H First Baptist Church, Wilmington 

Davidson, Miss Lucille First Baptist Church, Roxboro 

Farmer, Mrs. W. D First Baptist Church, Rocky Mount 

Havnaer, Mrs. L. E First Baptist Church, Lenoir 

Lanter, Mrs. S. G First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem 

Littlejohn, Miss Euwilda First Baptist Church, Gastonia 

Maxwell, Miss Viola First Baptist Church, Raleigh 

Perry, Miss Pauline First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem (Associate) 

Proctor, Miss A. Lucille Ardmore Baptist Church, Winston-Salem 

Riggs, Miss Elizabeth Grace Street Baptist Church, Durham 

Seamster, Miss Janie Hocutt Memorial Church, Burlington 

Sheets, Miss Marie First Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Warren, Mrs. J. W First Baptist Church, Durham 

Wilmar, Mrs. R. B Hayes Barton Baptist Church, Raleigh 

Wheeler, Miss Eleanor First Baptist Church, Asheville 



234 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



FINANCIAL SECRETARIES 

Name Church and Address 

Bullard, Mr. L. G Tabernacle Church, Raleigh 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S DIRECTORS 

Ruth, Miss Vera Tabernacle Church, Raleigh 

MINISTERS OF MUSIC 

Brietz, Mr. Raymond Pritchard Memorial Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Easom, Mr. Horace First Baptist Church, Shelby 

Emurion, Mr. Henri First Baptist Church, Wilmington 

Gough, Mr. Frank First Baptist Church, Asheville 

Johnson, Mrs. Wingate M Ardmore Baptist Church, Winston-Salem 

Miller, Mr. H. Grady First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem 

Oncley, Mr. Paul B First Baptist Church, Durham 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARIES 

Association Missionary and Address 

Brushy Mt Thompson, Miss Lucy, North Wilkesboro 

Caldwell Keller, Miss Ruth, Granite Falls 

Carolina Banks, Miss Blanch, Hendersonville 

Haywood Lewis, Miss Madge, Waynesville 

Little River Rogers, Miss Zula, Mamers 

Macon and W. Liberty Gibson, Mrs. Fannie, Franklin 

Pilot Mountain Lawrence, Rev. Tom, 2026 Academy St., W. S. 

Roanoke Bullard, Mr. W. G., Rocky Mount 

South Fork Sowers, Miss Texie, Newton 

Surry Marks, Miss Willa, 132 Rawley Ave., Mt. Airy 

Tuckaseigee Johnson, Miss Gretchin, Cullowhee 

Wilmington Pate, Rev. E. W., Wilmington 

Yancey and French Broad Hilliard, Miss Laura Mae, Burnsville 



ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE NOW SERVING AS 
CHAPLAINS IN THE ARMY AND NAVY 



Andrews, W. O., Robersonville 
Arrington, C. A., Elizabeth City 
Baker, E. F., Andrews 
Baker, H. O., Charlotte 
Baldwin, Carroll C, Clarkton 
Beach, B. S., Troy 
Bennett, Ivan L., Ash 
Biles, T. H., High Point_ 
Blackmore, James H., King 
Blanchard, Henry N., Greensboro 
Blythe, Norman, Harrellsville 
Brooks, G. Webb, Maxton 
Brown, Millard R., Windsor 
Cain, L. W., Casar 
Connell, Raymond, Boonville 
Costner, Robert L., Greensboro 
Cannon, Ralph L., Zebulon 
Crow, C. C, Lattimore 
Davis, J. W., Durham 
Duling, C. W., Burgaw 
Evans, L. R., Spencer 
Everett, J. R., Washington 
Ford, Gerald K., New London 
Fordham, B. B., Farmville 



Forsythe, Paul, Boonville 
Francis, C. Arthur, Winterville 
Funderburk, Guy B., Greensboro 
Freeman, Allen, Salisbury 
Godwin, Clarence E., Ahoskie 
Gupton, B. L., Pittsboro 
Gwaltney, R. C, Statesville 
Hagler, O. J., Oteen 
Hill, Woodrow W., High Point 
Hobgood, C. E., Hertford 
Hollingsworth, L. H., Wake Forest 
Holland, T. C, Mooresboro — Major 
Howington, N. P., Shelby 
Hudson, J. A., Catawba 
Huggins, F. M., Hendersonville 
Israel, F. L., Marshallberg 
Leppard, LeRoy, Wendell 
Long, J. Raymond, Charlotte 
Lyons, W. W., Lenoir 
McConnell, Charles B., Nashville 
McGee, Henry F., Jacksonville 
Mabry, V. L., Monroe 
Marler, J. D., Lowell 
Milne, W. P., Jr., Aulander 



Annual of Session 1943 



235 



Morgan, J. Andrew, Cary 
Muckle, Coy, Charlotte 
Newman, Leslie R., Wendell 
Nickens, Paul D., Murfreesboro 
Pollock, A. L., Red Oak 
Pridgen, Lee, Wake Forest 
Proctor, Gilmer, Mocksville 
Reynolds, M. E., Asheville 
Searcy, John C, Avondale 
Starling, H. R., Greensboro 



Teague, L. W., Spruce Pine 
Tomlinson, A. S., Laurinburg 
Upchurch, P. B., Monroe 
Vann, Luther R., Bakersville 
Walker, A. A., Greensboro 
Wall, Broadus E., Hendersonville 
Waterson, J. V., Pine Tops 
Williams, W. W., Oteen 
Willis, E. G., Belcross 
Worley, Wade W., Tuxedo 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS 

This roster of ministers is made from the records furnished by the Asso- 
ciational Clerks who get the information from the Clerks of the churches. 
If when a minister changes his address he will notify the Statistical Secretary 
of such change it will be greatly appreciated. From this list is made the 
mailing list for use at Baptist Headquarters in Raleigh, also* the list of North 
Carolina ministers published in the Annual of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion. Please give notice immediately of any needed correction. 

(Signed) L. L. Morgan, 

Statistical Secretary. 

Ordained Ministers Who Are Pastors 



Abernethy, C. A., Marshallberg 
Abernethy, W. W., Hillsboro 
Abrams, W. E., Marion, Rt. 4 
Acree, R. W., Burgaw 
Adams, C. L., Santeetlah 
Adams, R. E., Winston-Salem, Rt. 7 
Adams, T. A., Adams 
Adams, Wm. T., Yadkinville 
Adkins, Eulis G., Ramseytown 
Adkinson, W. C, Swepsonville 
Akins, R. Lane, Hayesville 
Aldrich, A. Douglas, Wake Forest 
Alexander, Arvill P., Elkin 
Alexander, M. O., Beaufort 
Allard, J. E., Wilmington, Rt. 2 
Allen, C. L., Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Alley, H. M., Highlands 
Allgood, J. G., Yadkinville, Route 1 
Allman, J. H., Mill Springs 
Allred, J. M., Pomona, Box 119 
Almond, W. B., Albemarle, Rt. 4 
Anderson, George, Marion 
Anderson, H. B., Durham, 1104 

North Mangum St. 
Anderson, J. A., Penrose, Rt. 1 
Anderson, O. A., Rowland 
Andrews, Victor L., Mocksville 
Arant, N. F., Kinston, Rt. 4 
Armstrong, A. C, West Asheville 
Armstrong, T. D., High Point, 4134 

Hamilton St. 
Arnette, Roy, Dillon, S. C. 
Arrowood, R. C, Burnsville 
Ashley, Arthur C, Crumpler 
Ashley, R. C, Bina 
Ashley, G. N., Salemburg 



Ashley, W. D., Blowing Rock, Rt. 1 
Atkins, J. L. t Raleigh, Rt. 4 
Atkins, R. E., Raleigh, 27 Dixie 

Trail 
Atkinson, Laurie J., Lillington, Rt. 3 
Atkinson, C. B., Erlanger 
Austin, B. F., Kings Mountain 
Ayers, W. A., Shelby, 914 S. 

Lafayette St. 
Ayscue, J. E., Buie's Creek 
Averett, E. Y., Benson 
Bagby, A. Paul, Louisburg 
Bagwell, Jack R., Fairview, Box 1 
Bagwell, W. L., China Grove 
Bailey, Arlan A., Gastonia 
Bailes, E. W., Durham, 3009 Banner 

Ave. 
Bain, G. A., Dunn, Rt. 1 
Baker, C. E., Wilmington 
Baker, J. Wade, Rich Square 
Baker, Jeter P., Marion 
Baker, Herbert M., Pikeville 
Baker, Smoot A., Spencer 
Baker, S. D., Kannapolis, Rt. 1 
Ball, Kimsev R., Marshall, Rt. 1 
Ballard, W. H., Buckner 
Ballenger, Paul R., Naples 
Banister, M. L., Oxford 
Banning, Ralph, Horse Shoe 
Barker, Robert, Murphy 
Barker, W. H., High Point, Rt. 3, 

Box 362 
Barnes, C. R., Asheville, 30 Forsythe 

Street 
Barnes, J. H., Fayetteville, Rt. 3 
Barnes, M. L., Gastonia, Route 2 



236 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Barnett, Das Kelly, Chapel Hill 

Barnett, L. P., Union Mills 

Barrett, J. H., Concord 

Bartlett, E. R., Asheville, Box 7042 

Baucom, C. E., Wilson 

Baucom, H. W, Wake Forest 

Baucom, H. W., Jr., Statesville, 507 

Western Ave. 
Baucom, W. T., Spruce Pine 
Bean, Leonard B., Mortimer 
Bearden, Wm. Clyde, Greensboro, 

2809 High Point Road 
Beavers, E. A., Suit 
Beck, Arnold, Smokemont 
Belton, J. O., Mount Airy 
Belue, W. Broadus, Landrum, S. C. 
Benfield, H. S., Lenoir 
Benfield, R. Knolan, Hickory 
Benfield, J. G., Franklin, Rt. 3 
Bennett, Edward P., Morganton, Rt. 3 
Bennett, H. B., Shallotte 
Bennett, H. M., Apple Grove 
Bennett, J. C, Albemarle, Route 1 
Bennett, R. O., Wake Forest 
Bennett, Willis, Oteen 
Benton, A. L., Swansboro 
Benton, Bruce, Rockingham 
Biddle, J. T., Enka 
Biggerstaff, W. P., Shelby 
Billings, Roy, Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Binkley, J. N., Harmony, Rt. 1 
Binkley, O. T., Wake Forest 
Bishop, Joseph, Gay 
Black, J. H, Windom 
Blackburn, A. F., Lincolnton, Rt. 4 
Blackburn, G. R., Whitehead 
Blackburn, J. Glenn, Lumberton 
Blackburn, R. G, Lincolnton, Rt. 4 
Blackman, J. F., Buie's Creek 
Blackwell, Hoyt, Mars Hill 
Blake, J. M., Raleigh, Rt. 1 
Blalock, Jesse, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Blalock, John N., Norwood 
Blankenship, F. P., Dillsboro 
Blanton, M. D., Forest City 
Blanton, S. L., Wilmington 
Blevins, Fred, Wilkesboro 
Blevins, Hillery, Hays 
Blevins, J. C, Grassy Creek 
Blevins, M. L., Springfield 
Blevins, S. L., Hays 
Blue, W. C, Manteo 
Blythe, C. E., Etowah 
Blythe, J. E., Hendersonville 
Bobbitt, C. B., Kings Mountain 
Bobbitt, David E., Charlotte 
Boggan, W. H, Rockingham 
Bolch, O. H., Gastonia, 207 West 8th 

St., Box 425 
Bolick, W. P., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Booker, E. B., Fayetteville, 1016 Bel- 
mont Circle 



Bookout, L. E., Gastonia, Victory 
Station 

Bostic, Wade, Shelby 

Bower, F. A., Morganton, 207 Avery 
Avenue 

Bowers, B. A., Gastonia 

Bowers, H. C, Middlesex 

Bowman, J. N., Roxboro, Rt. 2 

Bradley, Earl L., Wilmington, 718 
North 4th Street 

Bradley, L. V., Henrietta 

Bradley, Ralph, Whittier 

Bradley, Silas, Tryon, Rt. 1 

Bradley, W. J., Albemarle 

Braum, M. L., Salisbury, Catawba 
College 

Bray, B. F., Marion 

Bray, Tom W., Faith 

Brazil, S. K., Charlotte, 216 Brad- 
ford Drive 

Breedlove, W. M., Glenville 

Brickhouse, R. E., Warrenton 

Bridgers, Leo T., Durham 

Bridges, O. B., Shelby, Route 4 

Briggs, W. T. C, Greenville, 1106 
Cotanche Street 

Brinkley, R. O., Spencer, Box 486 

Brinson, H. F., Currie 

Brisson, C. E., Dublin 

Brock, J. A., Shelby, 209 Gidney 
Street 

Brock, Paul T., Greenville, S. C, 
27 Thurston St. 

Brooks, B. B., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 

Brooks, D. P., Elizabeth City 

Brooks, J. C, Granite Falls 

Brooks, C. E., Gastonia, 417 Park 
Avenue 

Brothers, A. R., Rockingham 

Brown, A. L., Southport 

Brown, Denver T., Marshall, Rt. 1 

Brown, J. C, Branberry 

Brown, J. E., Tuckaseigee 

Brown, j. M., Nealsville 

Brown, William, Blowing Rock 

Brown, Willard A., Madison, Box 6 

Brown, W. Herbert, Bryson City 

Brown, W. V., West Hillsboro, Box 
114 

Bryan, G. McLeod, Garner 

Bryant, H. G, Whitnel 

Bryant, J. S., Roaring River 

Bryant, K. E., Pittsboro 

Bryant, W. B., Connelly Springs 

Bryson, J. W., Candler, Rt. 1 

Buchanan, Ade, Celo 

Buchanan, C. A., Toecane, Rt. 1 

Buchanan, J. A., Clarissa 

Buchanan, Will L., Bryson City 

Buckner, A. J., Asheville, 61 Han- 
over Street 

Buckner, J. J., Mars Hill 



Annual of Session 1943 



237 



Buckner, J. W., Concord, 191 Frank- 
lin Avenue 
Bugg, Lawrence W., West Asheville, 

284 State Street 
Bullard, G. W., Rocky Mount, 315 

Rose Street 
Bumgarner, D. L., Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Bumgarner, E. V., Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Bunn, John H., Morehead City 
Burch, G. W., Wadesboro, Rt. 3 
Burchette, Chas. P., Gastonia, East 

Baptist Church 
Burgiss, L. Grady, Greensboro, 103 

East Wendover Ave. 
Burkett, G. C, Jefferson 
Burnett, R. B., Lenoir, Rt. 2 
Burnette, O. F., Cruso 
Burris, C. C, Wingate 
Bushyhead, Ben, Whittier 
Butler, Jas. H., Wilmington, 16 S. 

Washington St. 
Byerly, E. W., Bear Creek, Rt. 2 
Byrd, C. E., Durham, Rt. 1 
Byrd, Eugene, Midland 
Byrd, Manley, Hays 
Byrum, J. T., Tyner 
Cable, J. E., Yellow Creek 
Cadle, R. A, Enfield 
Cain, Guy S., Rural Hall 
Caldwell, C. A., Mount Holly 
Caldwell, E. J., North Belmont 
Caldwell, W. H., Sparta 
Cale, W. F., Jr., Tyner 
Calloway, J. W., State Road 
Camp, W. G., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Campbell, A. L., Landis, Box 151 
Campbell, A. Hartwell, Greenville 
Campbell, R. C, Cranberry 
Campbell, Roy D., Bakersville 
Campbell, R. R., Louisburg, Rt. 4 
Campbell, W. L., High Point, Rt. 5 
Canady, E. H., Elizabethtown 
Canipe, J. C, Boone 
Cannon, D. Boyd, Shelby 
Cantrell, J. R., Boiling Springs 
Carpenter, L. L., Raleigh 
Carpenter, Ralph B., Fallston 
Carr, W. B., Mooresville, 201 West 

Center Ave. 
Carrick, J. L., Colonial Beach, Va. 
Carter, J. E., Hildebran, Box 24 
Carter, J. R., Conway, S. C. 
Cash, A. B., Murphy 
Cashwell, T. L., Gastonia, 321 South 

Columbia St. 
Catlett, N. A., Cary, Rt. 1 
Caudle, E. P., Winston-Salem Rt. 3 
Caudle, W. S., Raleigh, Rt. 2 
Caudle, Zeb A., Lenoir, Rt. 1 
Caulder, G. C, Chesterfield, S. C. 
Chambers, Gay, Canton, Rt. 2 
Chamblee, E. C, Farmville 



Chandler, L. C, Davis 
Chapman, M. G., Boger City 
Chapman, M. W., Fayetteville, Box 

286 
Chapman, N. H., Rosman 
Chappel, J. D., Robbinsville 
Chastain, P. H., Culberson, Rt. 2 
Cheatwood, M. C, Spartanburg, S. C. 
Cherry, H. E., Raleigh 
Childers, W. Paul, Dover, Rt. 1 
Chilton, J. W., Pilot Mountain 
Church, Avery M., Winston-Salem, 

1301 Forest Ave. 
Christmas, T. P., Charlotte, 3747 

Commonwealth Ave. 
Christie, Jas. H., Waynesville, 216 

Delwood Road 
Clark, L. S., Mount Holly 
Clanton, D. A., Kannapolis, Rt. 1 
Clemmons, D. M., Selma 
Clevelend, Curtis P., Newsome, Va. 
Clifford, J. Roy, Wilmington, 1810 

Market Street 
Clifton, J. B., Greensboro, Bessemer 

Branch, Rt. 6 
Cline, D. F., Swannanoa 
Cline, J. T., Hildebran 
Cloer, Andrew, Cashiers 
Cloer, G. A., Leatherman 
Cloer, M. G., Alexis 
Coates, P. B., Loris, S. C. 
Coates, W. E., Raleigh, 615 Wills 

Forest St. 
Cockerham, C. C, Roaring River 
Coffey, Ham, Murphy 
Coggins, L. V., Semora 
Cole, Edward G., Winterville 
Coley, J. L., Raleigh, 614 West 

North Street 
Collins, Clyde, Greenville, S. C. 
Collins, F. T., Forest City 
Collins, Richard L., Wilson 
Collins, Sampson, Mount Airy 
Collins, T. D., Durham, 2505 Chapel 

Hill Blvd. 
Colvard, C. W., Hudson 
Colvard, G. W., Hickory, Rt. 3 
Condor, B. H., Hamlet, 727 Hamlet 

Avenue 
Cone, William B., Jr., Maysville 
Connell, J. H., Concord, Rt. 1 
Connell, L. V., Concord, Rt. 3 
Connell, W. J., Wadesboro, Rt. 2 
Connor, W. H., Central Falls 
Connor, W. T., Biltmore, 28 Sayles 

Road 
Conrad, A. B., High Point, 225 Lind- 
say Street 
Conrad, M. A., Winston-Salem, Rt. 5 
Cook, C. F., Hudson, Rt. 1 
Cook, L. M., Toast 
Cook, Otis, Casar, Rt. 1 



238 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Cook, R. R., Cramerton 

Cook, W. J., Boone, Rt. 1 

Cooper, B. A., Spindale 

Cooper, Clifton, Valdese Rt 1 

Cooper, Thomas N., Calypso 

Corbett, R. L., Marion 

Corey, A., Jamesville 

Corn, J. A., Asheville, Rt. 1 

Corn, J. W., Mars Hill 

Corn, Riley P., Asheville, Box 625 

Costner, J. W., Lawndale 

Cothren, Grant, Traphill 

Councilman, R. L., Windsor 

Covert, W. H., Pollocksville 

Coward, S. H., Wilmington 

Cox, G. C, Asheville, 285 Merrimon 

Ave. 
Cox, J. A., Thomasville, Box 345 
Crandall, P. E., Charlotte, 1900 

Queen's Road 
Crater, R. R., Ronda 
Crawford, C. E., Hobgood 
Crawford, L. H., Sylva, Rt. 1 
Crawford, R. L., Shelby, Rt. 3 
Creech, A. R., Princeton 
Creech, C S., Kenly, Rt. 2 
Creech, Oscar, Ahoskie 
Crews, J. A., Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Crisman, W. T., Siloam 
Crouch, John P., Valdese 
Crouch, W. Perry, Asheville, First 

Baptist Church 
Crouse, W. M., Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Crowder, W. P., Forest City, Rt. 2 
Crump, J. E., Hudson 
Culler, B. B., Boone 
Culler, W. J., Rockingham 
Cummins, J. W., Oxford 
Curl, L. D., Burlington, Rt. 5 
Currin, J. B., Roxboro 
Curtis, C. M.j Rhodhiss 
Dabney, Fred E., Charlotte, Rt. 4 
Dalton, B. G., Black Mountain 
Darnell, W. C, Mebane 
Davenport, C. W., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 7 
Davidson, W. W., Boiling Springs, 

Rt. 4 
Davis, B. L., Walstonburg 
Davis, Floyd Paul, Elizabeth City, 

616 W. Colonial Ave. 
Davis, Henry T., Salisbury, Rt. 2 
Davis, Jack, Marshall 
Davis, J. P., Leaksville 
Davis, J. T., Concord 
Davis, Winfrey, Tabor City 
Dawkins, Howard G., Hertford 
Day, Cline O., Nantahala 
Day, D. W., Elkin, Rt. 1 
Day, Fred N., Winston- Salem 
Day, Richard F., Elkin 
Dean, Gibson, Hope Mills 



Deaver, Cade, Laurinburg, 423 

McNair Avenue 
Deese, Eugene, Troutman 
Deese, Tommy, Monroe, 413 Mill 

Street 
Denny, G. L., Grassy Creek 
Denny, T. D., Nantahala 
Denny, W. E., Bina 
Denton, Lincoln, Connelly Springs 
Devine, C. L., Concord, Rt. 3 
DeWeese, R. L., Salisbury 
Digh, D. W., Lexington, Rt. 6 
Digh, Julius, Charlotte, Rt. 1 
Dixon, J. Huber, Pleasant Garden 
Dixon, L. M., Gastonia 
Dixon, R. L., Huntersville 
Dorsett, R. C, Siler City 
Dorsey, E. Horace, Bryson City 
Dosher, J. Bryan, Kelly 
Dowd, George, Rocky Point, Rt. 1 
Downs, P. E., Salemburg 
Draughan, T. S., Crutchfield 
Drum, Paul K., Cornelius 
Drye, C. G, Concord 
Drye, M. H., Charlotte, Rt. 6, Box 

88 A 
Dudhans, Bob, Flag Pond, Tenn. 
Duncan, J. M., Murfreesboro 
Dunning, A. H., High Point, 809 

Tryon St. 
Durden, C. W., Charlotte, 1620 Park- 
Drive 
Eagle, E. F., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Early, B. G., Cerro Gordo 
Early, J. F., Henrietta 
Early, Robert, Rutherfordton, Rt. 3 
Early, Waldo D., Fayetteville, 1079 

Southern Ave. 
Earp, Ronda, Vilas 
Easley, J. A., Wake Forest 
Eddinger, Clyde C, Southmont 
Edge, N. B., Dunn, Box 453 
Edmisten, D. M., Newland 
Edney, A. E., Flat Rock 
Edwards, J. G, Liberty 
Edwards, John T., Louisburg, Rt. 2 
Edwards, Otto, Loris, S. C. 
Edwards, Wilbar L., Lumberton, Rt. 4 
Eggers, R. C, Zionville 
Elam, W. A., Shelby 
Eldreath, J. W., Jefferson 
Eller, A. W., Wilkesboro, Rt. 1 
Eller, J. Ben, Greensboro, 709 Ashe- 

boro Street 
Ellington, R. P., Graham 
Elliott, E. S., Cherryville 
Elliott, P. L., Boiling Springs 
Elliott, W. P., Murphy, Rt. 3 
Elliott, Y. C, Lincolnton 
Ellis, C. J., Pembroke 
Ellis, R. A., First Baptist Church 

Salisbury 



Annual of Session 1943 



239 



Elmore, S. E., Graham 

Embler, N. J., Alexander 

Epley, Barney, Forest City 

Erwin, Lawrence, Balfour 

Erwin, T. E., Canton, Rt. 3 

Evans, J. N., Jr., Wallace 

Farmer, T. A., Lansing 

Faulkner, Melvin, Guilford College 

Ferguson, W. Forest, Clyde, Rt. 1 

Ferguson, Ralph, Mount Airy 

Fields, Luby W, Norwood 

Finger, John, Waynesville, Rt. 2 

Finlator, W. W., Weldon 

Fisher, Ben C, Nashville 

Fisher, V. C, Alexander, Rt. 1 

Fleming, L. A., Mount Airy 

Fletcher, Phillip D., Granite Falls 

Floyd, C. M., High Point 

Flowe, T. B., Thomasville 

Flynn, Thos. B., Winston- Salem 

Fogleman, T. W., Kannapolis, Rt. 1 

Folds, J. B., Aulander 

Ford, Howard J., Wilkesboro 

Forester, Fred, Drexel 

Foster, A. J., Boomer 

Foster, R. C, Leaksville 

Fowler, Carroll, Asheville, Box 233 

Fox, J. W., Lenoir, Rt. 2 

Fox, Zollie W., Lenoir 

Francis, W. C, Harrellsville 

Frazier, A. D., Red Oak 

Freeman, E. W., Selma 

Freeman, John, Judson 

Freeman, L. E. M., Raleigh, Rt. 3 

Freeman, Tom M., Selma, Rt. 1 

Freeman, Z. Miller, Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 2 
Frost, G. A., North Wilkesboro 
Frye, Robert, Drexel 
Fryer, T. W., New Bern, 40 Johnson 

Street 
Fulk, A. Lincoln, Washington 
Fuller, John P., Greensboro, 1812 

Freeman Mill Road 
Funderburk, O. W., Paw Creek 
Funderburk, J. F., Roxboro, Rt. 2 
Funderburk, Wade E., Pageland, S. 

C, Rt. 2 
Gaddis, Robert L., Hazelwood 
Gaddy, J. F., Whiteville, Rt. 3 
Gaines, Louis S., Fayetteville, First 

Baptist Church 
Gambill, Arthur, Moxley 
Gamble, Harry Y., Statesville 
Gamble, John, Raleigh 
Gantt, P. C, Ramseur 
Gardner, E. N., Henderson 
Gardner, R. F., Kannapolis, 300 York 

Street 
Gardner, W. M., Windom 
Garland, Roy, Robbinsville 
Garrett, F. B., Hayesville 



Garver, Carme, East Gastonia 

Gauldin, H. P., Greensboro, Rt. 5 

Gentry, W. F., Nashville, Rt. 1 

George, Esiah, Whittier 

Gibbs, J. M., Parkton 

Gibbs, R. S., Parkton 

Gibson, A. F., Siler City 

Gibson, E. M., Luck 

Gibson, J. B., Leicester 

Gillespie, C. L., Smithfield 

Gillespie, J. C, Reidsville, 419 Lind- 
say St. 

Gilley, J. A., Jonesville 

Glass, G. H., Spruce Pine 

Glosson, Qyde W., Kernersville 

Glosson, S. C, Moncure, Rt. 1 

Godwin, L. E., Selma, Rt. 1 

Good, Homer L., Stony Point 

Goode, W. E., Scotland Neck 

Goodman, Spencer H., Oval 

Goodman, S. R., Elizabethtown, Rt. 2 

Goodwin, H. F., Concord, 194 Acad- 
emy Street 

Gordon, R. R., Pittsboro 

Gore, E. O., Kings Mountain, Rt. 2 

Gore, Mack, Conway, S. C. 

Gosnell, Ray, Troy 

Graham, George M., Olivia 

Grainger, D. M., Loris, S. C, Rt. 3 

Grant, D. B., Cheraw, S. C, Rt. 2 

Graybeal, S. S., Creston 

Greene, Harvey, Whaley 

Greene, C. H., Canton 

Greene, Edward W., Henderson, 
Rt. 3, Box 289 

Green, C. O., Cary 

Green, I. H., Balfour 

Green, Job, Blairsville, Ga., Rt. 3 

Green, Levi, Deep Gap 

Green, N. M., Boone 

Green, Oliver B., Salisbury, Rt. 1 

Green, Roscoe, Deep Gap 

Green, R. T., Wake Forest 

Green, Tipton, Boone 

Green, V. W., Pineola 

Greer, J. W., Granite Falls 

Gresham, N. E., Beulaville 

Grice, J. B., Asheville, 16 Vance 
Crescent 

Griffin, George J., Zebulon 

Griffin, J. D., Concord 

Griffin, Luke W., Marshall, Rt. 3 

Griffin, N. H., Marshall, Rt. 3 

Griffith, Charles, Columbus 

Grigg, W. R., Winston-Salem, 8 Park 
Blvd. 

Griswald, Lewis, Rutherfordton, Rt. 3 

Groce, J. H., Cana, Rt. 1, Box 16 

Guffie, Raleigh, Franklin, Rt. 1 

Guthrie, W. B., Columbia 

Guy, T. Sloan, Gatesville 

Guy, Troy, Whaley 



240 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Gwaltney, J. C, Kannapolis, Box 518 

Hagaman, Lawrence, Beech Creek 

Haga, K. L., Newland 

Hagler, Ottis J., Swannanoa 

Hagler, R. M., Caroleen 

Hall, E. J., Burnsville, Rt. 2 

Hall, H. M., Benson, Rt. 2 

Hall, L. C, Mayodan 

Hall, J. Howard, Clyde, Rt. 1 

Hall, J. Howard, Mount Airy, Rt. 2 

Hall, M. F., Marion 

Hall, R. F., Lillington 

Hall, R. J., Bladenboro 

Hallman, John A., Lattimore 

Hamby, Grady A., Boone, Route 2, 

Box 152 
Hamby, R. P., Swannanoa 
Hammett, H. G., Waynesville 
Hammonds, S. A., Lumberton, Rt. 2 
Hancock, Ernest D., Star 
Hancock, W. F., Hemp 
Hand, Harry C, Whitakers 
Hardaway, J. L., Greenville, S. C. 
Hardin, E. F., Morganton, 500 S. 

Green Street 
Hardin, N. S., Shelby 
Hardwick, O. E., Conway, S. C. 
Harrell, H. F., Lattimore 
Harrelson, A. D., Loris, S. C. 
Harrington, Ray W., Greensboro, 

509 Delancey Street 
Harrington, W. B., Williamston 
Harris, Carl V., Wake Forest 
Harris, E. M., Aberdeen 
Harris, E. R., Virgilina, Va. 
Harris, Horace, Lenoir 
Harris, J. P., Bethel 
Harris, L. B., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Harris, M. L., Valdese 
Harris, Reid R., Hemp 
Hart, M. D., Husk 
Hartman, O. M., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 2 
Hartsell, Bruce V., Franklinton 
Hartsell, Lee, Stanfield 
Haskett, W. E., Tuckaseigee 
Hastings, M. L., Drexel 
Hatley, S. A., Albemarle, Rt. 4 
Hathcock, A. A., Concord, Rt. 2 
Hawkins, W. L., Gastonia, 405 East 

Second Ave. 
Hawks, Hubert, Mount Airy 
Hayes, A. B., Hays 
Hayes, J. E., North Wilkesboro 
Hayes, Jas. M., Winston-Salem, 812 

Overbrook Ave. 
Hayes, Mello, Pickens, S. C, Rt. 1 
Hayes, W. Noah, North Wilkesboro 
Haynes, Grady J., Concord, 205 

Young Street 
Haynie, F. W., Asheville, 842 Hay- 
wood Road 



Hearne, T. W., Rockingham 
Heath, R. E., Asheboro, Rt. 1 
Heaton, Geo. D., Charlotte, 1900 

Queens Road 
Hedden, W. A., Murphy 
Hedgepeth, G. C., Morehead City 
Hedgepeth, I. P., Lumberton 
Helms, V. T., Monroe, Box 409 
Hemphill, Carl, Morganton, Rt. 2 
Hemphill, F. D., Durham, 404 Third 

Avenue 
Henderson, C. H., Hickory, Rt. 1 
Henderson, T. S., Barnardsville 
Hendricks, Garland A., Apex, Rt. 3 
Hendrix, Raymond, Boone 
Henline, J. H., Qarissa 
Henry, B. G., Tryon 
Hensley, B. S., Sylva, Rt. 1 
Hensley, Ralph R., Candler, Rt. 1 
Herring, C. P., Fairmont 
Herring, Owen F., Durham, 702 

Buchanan Boulevard 
Herring, Ralph A., Winston-Salem, 

912, Linwood Ave. 
Hester, B. B., Orrum 
Hester, C. R., St. Pauls 
Hester, Paul G., Wake Forest, Rt. 3 
Heyman, C. M., Jr., Hendersonville 
Hiatt, H. B., Kannapolis, 201 Buick 

Avenue 
Hickman, T. O., Williamston 
Hicks, A. M., Winston-Salem, Rt. 5 
Hicks, E. B., Harmony 
Hicks, Edley, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Hicks, J. T., Asheville, 7 Factory 

Hill 
Hicks, P. A., Belmont 
Hicks, Randolph D., Germanton 
Hight, L. J., Greensboro, 1406 Tucker 

Street 
Hill, J. C, China Grove, Rt. 2 
Hill, J. H., Salisbury, 124 Klumac 

Street 
Hill, W. C, Gastonia 
Hill, W. E., Matthews 
Hill, Walter, Monroe 
Hilliard, Otho, Red Springs 
Hilton, O. W., Isabella, Tenn. 
Hines, H. B., Oriental 
Hinson, J. W., Jonesville 
Hinson, Roy L., Lincolnton, 209 

Grove Street 
Hinton, C. R., Albemarle 
Hocutt, George L., Charlotte, 609 E. 

36th Street 
Hocutt, H. M., Biltmore 
Hodge, C. S., Greensboro, First Bap- 
tist Church 
Hodge, D. D., Mount Airy 
Hodge, D. W., Nebo, Rt. 1 
Hodges, E. C, Hendrix 
Hodges, Ira, Banner Elk 



Annual of Session 1943 



241 



Hodges, J. L., New Bern 
Hoffman, J. E., Lawndale, Rt. 3 
Hoffman, W. Arthur, Gastonia, 1326 

W. Franklin Ave. 
Holbert, Floyd, Tryon 
Holcomb, George, Rosman 
Holden, N. E., Franklin, Rt. 3 
Holder, Gurney, Mount Airy 
Holland, C. C., Hickory 
Hollar, Floyd, Kings Mountain 
Hollifield, Waits, Marion, Rt. 2 
Holloway, J. F., Lillington 
Holmes, W. B., Albemarle 
Holt, L. D., Bethel 
Holt, Robert L., Morganton, 500 S. 

Green Street 
Hooker, P. H., Old Fort, Tenn. 
Hooper, D. C.. Norton 
Hopkins, Frank B., Bakersville 
Hopkins, Fred H., Norwood 
Hopkins, J. S., High Point, 324 

Woodrow Avenue 
Hopkins, W. B., China Grove 
Hornbuckle, Clifford, Cherokee 
Home, C. B., Roseboro, Rt. 1 
Hornsby, C. H., Clinton 
Hovis, R. W., Longhurst 
Howard, A. T., Landrum, S. C, Rt. 1 
Howard, Charles B., Buie's Creek 
Howell. A. P., White Top, Va. 
Howerton, R. T., Raleigh 
Hoyle, J. E., Winterville 
Hudson, C. F., Durham, Box 1581 
Hudson, E. V., Cramerton 
Hudson, S. F.j Lillington 
Huffman, J. G., Parsonville 
Huffman, J. E., Lawndale, Rt. 3 
Huggins, Hubert, Dallas 
Hughes, Jesse, Burnsville 
Hughes, J. G., Valley 
Hughes, R. L., Youngsville 
Hughston, John W., Jr., Belmont 
Huneycutt, C. C, Stanfield 
Huneycutt, R. N., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Hunt, Howard T., Lexington, Rt. 6 
Hunt, T. R., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Huntley, David, Fairview 
Huntley, R. K., Rutherfordton, Rt. 1 
Huntley, S. F., Hendersonville, Rt. 1 
Huntley, W. C, Asheville, Rt. 4 
Hutchins, H. W., Mocksville, Rt. 2 
Hutchins, W. Wilbur, Raleigh 
Hutchinson, Phillip, Greensboro, 

Rt. 2 
Hux, M. L., Fuquay Springs 
Hyatt, J. L., Whittier, Route 1 
Icard, A. W., Wake Forest 
Isenhour, J. A., Hiddenite 
Ivester, Seth, Lawndale 
Jackson, I. B., Rutherfordton 
Jackson, R. R., High Point, 918 Red- 
ding St. 



Jackson, J. W., Biltmore, 171 On- 
tario St. 
Jacobs, L. W., Pembroke 
Jamerson, A. Z., Burnsville, Rt. 1 
James, Lee A., Boiling Springs 
James, Wade H., Greensboro, 1504 — 

16th St. 
Jenkins, J. L., Boiling Springs 
Jenkins, J. L., Fairview 
Jenkins, P. G., Tuckaseigee 
Johnson, C. R., Fayetteville, 115 

Burns St. 
Johnson, E. N., Fair Bluff 
Johnson, Guy, Boiling Springs 
Johnson, J. Jeter, Cherokee 
Johnson, J. H., Bryson City 
Johnson, J. McRay, Durham, 2530 

Rochelle St. 
Johnson, J. S., Fayetteville, Rt. 5 
Johnson, J. Samuel, Durham 
Johnson, Lee, Mount Pleasant 
Johnson, Lester C, Hays 
Johnson, L. L., Magnolia 
Johnson, M. M., Spring Hope 
Johnson, T. C, Kinston 
Johnson, T. F., Bolivia, Box 286 
lohnson, W. I., Elizabeth City, Box 

286 
lohnson, Walt N., Salisbury 
Johnson, W. O., Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Johnson, W. O., St. Pauls 
Jollay, Charles, Durham, Rt. 4 
Jones, Broadus E., Raleigh 
Jones, Dayton N., Heaton 
Jones, Forest, La Grange 
Jones, H. B., Boger City 
Jones, H. E., Buie's Creek 
Jones, J. Clarence, Newell 
Jones, J. L., Murfreesboro 
Jones, Troy E., Red Springs 
Jones, W. H., Saluda 
Jones, W. J., Salemburg 
Jones, W. S., Shelby, Rt. 4 
Jones, W. W., Kannapolis, 312 West 

Avenue 
Jordan, E. G., City View, Winston- 
Salem 
Jordan, L. R., Creedmoor 
Journey, Fred, Mount Airy 
Joyce, J. A., Sandy Ridge, Rt. 1 
Joyner, Edward B., Concord, Rt. 1 
Joyner, N. S., Waxhaw, Rt. 2 
Justice, Franklin, East Marion 
Justice, H. H., Marion 
Kanipe, L. M., Boiling Springs, Box 

34 
Keaton, T. C, Winston-Salem, 2522 

Greenway Court 
Keller, O. A., Sanford, R. F. D. 
Keller, Roy D., Spruce Pine 
Kendall, M. H., Mars Hill 
Kendrick, Olin, Forest City, Rt. 2 



242 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Kerley, I. E., Greensboro, 1704 

Florida St. 
Kerstein, M. L., Biltmore, 32 Sayles 

Road 
Kidd, J. C, Bennett 
Kilpatrick, J. B., Balsam Grove 
Kilstrom, E. A., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 4 
Kincheloe, J. W., Rocky Mount 
Kincheloe, J. W., Jr., North Wilkes- 

boro 
King, Bascom K., Steeds 
King, Ernest, Vanceboro 
King, R. Von, Statesville, Box 1222 
Kinnett, A. D., Burlington 
Kirk, J. E., Lewisville 
Kiser, A. M., Waco 
Kiser, W. R., Concord, Rt. 1 
Kizer, M. A., Weaverville 
Kizer, R. L., Thomasville 
Knight, Frank, Shulls Mills 
Knight, I. Eugene, Morven 
Knight, John H., Mebane 
Knight, Ralph W, Durham 
Knight, W. A., Marshville 
Kuykendall, Edd E., Hendersonville 
Lackey, J. H., Alamance 
Lail, James, Taylorsville 
Lake, J. Tilman, Wadesboro, Box 125 
Lamb, S. N., Whiteville 
Lambe, B. C, Danville, Va., Rt. 4 
Lambert, H. Fletcher, Statesville, 

Rt. 6 
Lambert, Jess, Smokemont 
Lamm, Albert S., Wake Forest, Rt. 2 
Lamm, S. L., Avondale 
Laney, W. C, Brookford 
Lanier, J. E., Winton 
Lanier, R. C., Rocky Mount, 113 West 

Ridge Street 
Lankford, Elijah, Greensboro, 2214 

Poplar Street 
Lanter, G. G.,_ Reidsville, Box 224 
Larkins, Dennis M., Knightdale 
Laughlin, C. F., Cedar Falls 
Lawing, E. R., Marion 
Lawrence, T. S., Winston-Salem, 226 

Academy Street 
Lawton, W. W., Jr., Charlotte, 3518 

Commonwealth Ave. 
Lea, Lester, Old Fort, Tenn. 
Leatherwood, F. H., Waynesville, 

Box 358 
Ledford, Blaine, Brasstown 
Ledford, Floyd, Bakersville 
Lee, R. Cole, Greensboro, Rt. 2, Box 

116 
Leftwich, C. L., Mount Airy 
Lennon, J. T., Swan Quarter 
Leonard, W. M., Bennett, Rt. 2 
Lewis, G. Carl, Chadbourn 
Lewis, M. L., Morganton, Rt. 4 



Lindsey, E. B., Bryson City 
Lindsey, Garfield, Luck 
Lindsey, R. F., Morehead City 
Liner, G. T., Raleigh, 618 West 

Cabarrus Street 
Link, John R., Apex 
Link, Wm. C, Jr., Wingate 
Lipe, G. F., Durham 
Lister, W. F., Rutherfordton 
Little, I. B., Monroe, Rt. 2 
Little, James B., Marshville 
Littleton, B. B., Lincolnton 
Lloyd, Richard, Jackson 
Lloyd, R. C, Statesville 
Lockamy, E. P., Barnesville 
Lockee, A. A., Icard 
Locklear, C. E., Pembroke 
London, J. Troy, Reidsville, Rt. 5 
Long, E. A., Germanton 
Long, O. S., Casar 
Long, Samuel, Monroe, Rt. 2 
Loudermilk, W. A., Gastonia 
Love, Hoyle, Newton, Rt. 2 
Lovingood, C. F., Grandview 
Lovingood, R. P., Marble 
Lowder, D. H., Salisbury, 810 South 

Church Street 
Lowder, H. C, Rocky Mount, 708 

Arlington Street 
Loy, J. W., Jr., Lewisville, Rt. 3 
Luckadee, W. L., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Lucas, J. R., Aberdeen 
Luck, W. S., North Wilkesboro 
Ludlum, Lewis E., Carolina Beach 
Luffman, J. H., Ronda 
Luffman, T. M., Jonesville 
Luffman, W. B., North Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 2 
Lunsford, Drew, Andrews 
Lunsford, Reid, Asheville, Rt. 2 
Lunsford, T. O., Asheville 
Lynch, W. L., Mars Hill 
McAuley, S. F., Brevard 
McCann, Levi, Roaring River 
McCall, A. C, Cullowhee 
McCall, Ernest, Penrose 
McCall, S. B., Rt. 1, Brevard 
McCluney, J. L., Henrietta 
McClure, L. A., Murphy, Rt. 2 
McCready, J. D., Morganton, 

105 South King Street 
McCrimmon, John H., Henderson, 

Box 354 
McDaniel, E. L., Mooresboro 
McElrath, Hugh T., Statesville 
McFarland, R. A., Gaffney, S. C. 
McGee, A. L., High Point, Rt. 2 
McGee, W. K., Thomasville 
McGinnis, H. M., Wadesboro, 

Box 206 
McGinnis, O. L., Asheville, Box 1002 
McGinnis, S. T., Sylva 



Annual of Session 1943 



243 



McGuire, J. W., Brevard, Rt. 2 
Mclntyre, Donald, Fayetteville, Rt. 5 
McKinney, Carl, Marion 
McKnight, C. H., Independence, Va. 
McLeod, J. A., Mars Hill 
McLeod, Spencer, Cranberry 
McMahan, F. L., Marion 
McMahan, P. L., Swannanoa 
McMahan, W. F., Marion 
McManus, O. W., Gibson 
McMillan, J. A., Thomasville 
McSwain, W. L., Glen Alpine, Box 18 
Mace, H. H., Hendersonville, Rt. 4 
Mace, R. G., Catawba, Rt. 2 
Mack, Frank, Topton 
Mahaffey, Roy, Gastonia, 104 Dean 

Street 
Maness, B. L., Carthage, Rt. 1 
Mangum, O. R., Lenoir 
Mann, H. H., Canton, Rt. 1 
Manuel, J. F., Germanton, Rt. 2 
Manuel, M. F., Winston- Salem, 

618 West 16th St. 
Marchman, J. F., Franklin 
Marler, J. D., Lowell 
Marlow, H. K., Tabor City 
Marshall, F. H., Durham, 

313 Alexander Ave. 
Marshburn, R. F., Salemburg 
Martin, G. A., Mamie 
Masteller, H. K., Canton 
Matheny, C. C, Forest City 
Matheny, J. J., Blowing Rock, Rt. 1 
Matthews, Luther J., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 5 
Mauney, J. Lloyd, Charlotte, 

2805 Tuckaseigee Road 
Maxwell, F. C, Erwin 
Mayberry, R. F., Rhodhiss 
Maynor, C. H., Red Springs, Rt. 2 
Maynor, Dawley, Pembroke 
Maynor, Roy, Pembroke, Rt. 3 
Medlin, D. J., Bryson City 
Mehaffey, R. R., Leicester, Rt. 1 
Meigs, J. C, Pageland, S. C. 
Melton, N. A., Columbus 
Melton, R. G., Forest City, Rt. 2 
Melton, Robert G., Rockingham 
Memory, J. I., Randleman 
Messer, Homer, Valdese, Rt. 1 
Miller, Coy R., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Miller, Doyle, Canton, Rt. 1 
Miller, D. C, Hays 
Miller, Grant, Jr., Granite Falls, Rt. 2 
Miller, Herbert, Sunbury 
Miller, H. O., High Point, 

2333 Edgewood 
Miller, Joseph, Butler, Tenn. 
Miller, Lawrence A., Boiling Springs 
Miller, Lee, Purlear 
Miller, Ralph A., North Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 1, Box 192 



Mills, G. T., Apex, Rt 3 

Millsaps, J. C, Bushnell 

Mihton, B. L., Buck 

Minton, Grady, Vilas 

Mintz, M. L., Shallotte 

Mintz, S. I., Leland 

Mitchell, B. A., Kernersville, Rt. 1 

Mixon, F. O., Raleigh, 809 Person 

Street 
Monk, W. R., Roxboro 
Moore, Eugene, Cove Creek 
Moore, Frank R., Ellerbe 
Moore, W. H., Raleigh 
Moose, J. D., Charlotte, 120 South 

Goff Street 
Morgan, Frank W., Mars Hill, Rt. 1 
Morgan, S. Lewis, Jr., Dunn 
Morris, B. E., Durham, 1010 Broad 

Street 
Morris, L. J., Raleigh, 

2804 Anderson Drive 
Morris, Roy A., Sanford, 

308 North Avenue 
Morrisett, Stephen, Elkin 
Moss, W. R., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Mott, Marshall L., Winston-Salem, 

Ardmore Baptist Church 
Mull, J. O., Vale, Rt. 3 
Mumford, H. S., Matthews 
Munn, Lonnie D., Badin 
Murray, J. Gray, Cary 
Murray, J. T., Winston-Salem, 

Chatham Heights 
Mustain, A. P., Colerain, Rt. 1 
Myers, Donald G., Mount Olive 
Myrick, C. W., Fayetteville 
Nail, L. A., Burlington, 

Williamson Avenue 
Nash, H. E., Concord 
Neilson, J. A., Thomasville 
Newmans, A. S., Jonesville 
Newton, Dewey E., Shelby, Rt. 1 
Newton, I. T., Whiteville 
Newton, T. L., Raleigh, Rt. 3 
Nicols, H. L., Durham, Rt. 4 
Nix, A. T-, Rutherfordton 
Nix, J. 6., Satolah, Ga. 
Nix, Ralph, Edneyville 
Norman, E. C, East Bend 
Norris, C. H., Wake Forest 
Nuckles, R. O., Colfax, Rt. 1 
Oates, C. M., Pomona 
Oldham, S. W., Star 
Olive, Eugene, Wake Forest 
Orr, F. M., Etowah 
Orr, Oliver, Topoca 
Osborne, Irdel, Cricket 
Osborne, Mark R., Zebulon 
Osteen, J. E., Hendersonville, Rt. 3 
Ostwalt, R. B., Charlotte, 

2016 N. Tryon St., Rt. 5 
Otey, C. E., Mount Airy 



244 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Ousley, Carl L., Siler City 
Overby, D. W., Reidsville, 

83 Lawsonville Street 
Owen, J. C, Saluda 
Owen, J. R., Asheville, 

307 S. French Broad Ave. 
Owen, Ransey, Argura 
Owle, DeWitt, Bryson City 
Owle, William, Cherokee 
Oxendine, C. F., Lumberton 
Padgett, Wilson W., Wake Forest 
Page, W. M., Fuquay Springs 
Painter, Roby L., Balm 
Palmer, Jack, Murphy 
Pardue, Lloyd J., Elkin 
Pardue, R. J., Jonesville 
Parham, E. T., Charlotte, 

2120 Floral Avenue 
Parham, Otto, Balfour 
Parker, B. H., Bostic, Rt. 1 
Parker, C. C, Marion, Rt. 1 
Parker, C. E., Winston- Salem, 

598 Glade Street 
Parker, E. L., Goldsboro, 

Rt. 1, Box 235 
Parks, Pervis C, Cycle 
Parrish, A. D., Zebulon, Rt. 2 
Parrish, B. B., Ash 
Parris, Robert, Sylva, Rt. 1 
Parris, T. H., Clyde 
Parsons, Joe, Spindale 
Pate, E. W., Wilmington 
Pate, R. A., Bostic 
Pate, W. C, Marion, Rt. 2 
Paul, E. A., Lumberton, Rt. 5 
Payne, W. C, Blowing Rock 
Peacock, A. T., Marion, S. C. 
Peacock, C. B., Castalia 
Peake, Avery E., Canton, Rt. 2 
Pearce, J. Winston, Durham, 

911 West Markham Avenue 
Pearson, William, Morganton 
Peek, Wayne, West Asheville 
Peeler, B. F., Taylorsville 
Pegg, Fred W., Weaverville, Rt. 2 
Pegram, M. A., Zebulon, Rt. 2 
Pennell, Howard, Lenoir 
Perry, Edwin F., Fayetteville, 

219 Hull Road 
Pettit, W. E., Forest City 
Phelps, W. G., Wilmington 
Phillips, C. E., Gastonia, Box 324 
Phillips, Harvey, Cricket 
Phillips, Lee A., Plymouth 
Phillips, N. B., East Flat Rock, 

Box 175 
Phillips, Ralph, Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Pickler, J. M., Wingate 
Pierce, C. R., Durham, Rt. 5 
Pinnix, Lucius C, Jacksonville 
Pipes, J. C, Asheville, Rt. 1 
Pipes, W. C, Franklin, Rt. 4 



Pitt, Alvin, Wake Forest 

Plemmons, E. V., Luck 

Poe, W. D., Oxford 

Poindexter, W. H., Gaffney, S. C. 

Poole, Charles J., Pores Knob 

Pool, W. H., Carrboro 

Poston, Eugene E., Wake Forest 

Potts, E. H., Elizabeth City 

Powell, E. M., Henderson 

Powers, Arthur L., Lansing 

Powers, J. L., Durham, Rt. 3 

Powers, J. L., Elkin 

Preslar, Clyde, Marshville, Rt. 3 

Price, Bruce H., Asheboro 

Price, Gordon L., Roanoke Rapids 

Price, John B., Ellenboro, Rt. 1 

Price, J. Louis, Hickory, 41st Street 

Price, W. S., Brevard 

Prince, C. C, Lewiston 

Prince, G. Clyde, Loris, S. C. 

Propst, C. W., Charlotte, Rt. 4 

Putnam, D. F., Shelby 

Quick, H. A., Candler, Rt. 1 

Rainey, L. J., Grover 

Rasberry, R. J., Hallsboro 

Ray, Ben Lee, Blowing Rock 

Ray, Edd, Ivy, Rt. 1 

Ray, Elzie, Burnsville, Rt. 1 

Ray, J. C, Kannapolis 

Ray, Jas. W., Spindale 

Ray, Roy, Lenoir, Rt. 6 

Ray, Z. G., Rockfish, Box 4 

Reavis, M. F., Yadkinville 

Redding, L. G., Old Fort, Rt. 1 

Redwine, Richard K., Mount Airy 

Reece, Cecil, Marshall, Rt. 3 

Reece, Cleveland, Brevard 

Reece, D. G., Jonesville 

Reece, Paul, Drexel, Box 102 

Reed, Frank, Highland 

Reed, W. C, Kinston 

Reep, Clyde J., Lincolnton 

Reese, A. V., Hendersonville 

Reid, C. B., New London 

Renegar, Elma, Mount Airy 

Renegar, G. D., Harmony, Rt. 2 

Rhymer, R. H., Alexander, Rt. 1 

Rhyne, C. A., Salisbury, 

South Main Street 
Rhyne, M. P., Dallas 
Rhyne, S. A., Lumberton, Box 66 
Rice, Henry, Marshall, Rt. 3 
Richards, J. T., Rhodhiss 
Riddle, S. L., Greensboro, 2218 

Shober St. 
Riggan, J. W., Macon, Rt. 2 
Riggins, Reece D., Derita 
Riggs, O. L., Durham, Grace Road 
Rimmer, W. W., Lincolnton 
Roach, E. C, Kannapolis, 

310 Locust Street 
Roach, J. F., Norlina 



Annual of Session 1943 



245 



Roark, Keen C, Creston 

Robbins, J. Rector, Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Robbins, Ronda E., Greenville, S. C. 
Robbins, Woodrow W., Bolivia 
Roberson, E. A., Kernersville, Rt. 1 
Roberts, E. L., Black Creek 
Roberts, F. C, Charlotte, 

800 Norris Avenue 
Roberts, Lawrence, Shelby, Rt. 5 
Roberts, W. A., China Grove 
Robertson, J. P., Gilreath 
Robertson, V. E., Fort Mills, S. C. 
Robinson, D. J., New London 
Robinson, Frank, Raleigh, 

611 West Peace Street 
Robinson, W. E., St. Paul's 
Rogers, B. N., Biltmore, 

24 Ridgecrest Street 
Rogers, C. F., Biltmore, 

227 Summit Street 
Rogers, H. R., Canton, Rt. 1 
Rogers, H. P., Mars Hill 
Rogers, W. S., Robbinsville 
Rollins, B. F., Elkin 
Ross, M. J., Tryon 
Ross, M. L., Concord 
Rotan, Z. W., Concord, Rt. 2 
Royal, C. N., Durham, 

Angier Avenue Baptist Church 
Royal, F. M., Greenville, S. C. 
Royal, Howard, Traphill 
Royall, Peyton, Wake Forest 
Royster, G. L., Cooleemee 
Ruff, Wade, Rutherfordton 
Rufnn, C. E., Broadway 
Russell, D. D., Clyde, Rt. 1 
Russell, Ernest P., Wake Forest, 

Box 608 
Russell, W. G., Mooresville 
Russell, W. J, Albemarle, Rt. 1 
Ruth, W. D., Asheville, 

31 Parkman Avenue 
Salmon, Thomas, Jefferson 
Saris, Lester, Franklin, Rt. 2 
Sargeant, A. G., Kings Mountain 
Sasser, Lonnie, Murfreesboro 
Sasser, T. L., Greensboro, 

611 5 th Avenue 
Satterfield, R. H., Raleigh, 

22 Shepherd Street 
Sawyer, J. E., Sanford 
Scott, M. F., Jr., Durham, 

606 South Alston Ave. 
Scott, T. D., Mount Airy 
Scott, W. L., Durham, 

1013 Hale Street 
Scofield, Fon H., Jr., Wake Forest, 

Rt. 2 
Sears, V. W., Rural Hall 
Seigler, O. M., Hendersonville 
Sellers, J. F., White Plains 



Sessoms, J. B., Magnolia 
Settlemyre, G. F., Central Falls 
Sexton, E. C, Rocky Mount, Rt. 1 
Sexton, E. Z., Lansing 
Seymour, J. A., Albemarle 
Seymour, T. Y., Jonesboro 
Schum, H. S., Asheville, Rt. 4, 

Ben Lippen School 
Shearin, R. C, Hickory 
Shelton, Bernie, Mount Airy 
Shelton, David K., Jacksonville, 

Box 406 
Shepherd, Grady, Swiss 
Sheppard, Lee C, Raleigh, 

608 Rosemont 
Sherwood, Jas. C, Sherwood 
Shoe, E. C, Taylorsville 
Shoemaker, A. Z., Stokesdale 
Shope, B. F., Yellow Creek 
Shore, Howard, Boone 
Shore, J. C, Reidsville, Rt. 4 
Shore, R. H., Blowing Rock, Rt. 1 
Short, R. G., Hickory 
Shuford, Jess N., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 1 
Shuford, S. W., Hamrick 
Shumate, J. R., Sugar Grove, Va. 
Sides, H. L., Maiden 
Silvers, J. S., Lenoir, Rt. 4 
Simmons, C A., Mount Airy, Rt. 2 
Simmons, C. W., Jonesville 
Simmons, W. V., Ash 
Simms, Albert E., Littleton, Rt. 1 
Simpson, John H., Concord, Rt. 2 
Simms, E. T., Winston-Salem, 

143 South Green Street 
Singletarv, G. M., Cerro Gordo 
Sisk, J. T., Charlotte, Rt. 7 
Slagle, T. A., Almond 
Sledge, W. C, Lowell 
Smart, D. M., Forest City 
Smart, John, Connelly Springs 
Smith, A. J., Goldsboro 
Smith, Burl, Jefferson 
Smith, D. S., Canton, Rt. 2 
Smith, Douglass, Pageland, S. C. 

Box 187 
Smith, Ernest M., McAdenville 
Smith, Henry H., Deep Gap 
Smith, J. A., Ash 
Smith, J. D., Mount Holly 
Smith, Jas. H., Greensboro, 

1307 Summit Ave. 
Smith, J. M., Rockingham 
Smith, L. P., Andrews 
Smith, M. D., Haw River, Box 311 
Smith, M. L., Asheville, Rt. 2 
Smith, R. L., High Point, 
' 613 Woodbury Street 
Smith, Richard, Draper 
Smith, W. R., Greensboro 
Smith, W. T., Bryson City, Rt. 1 



246 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Smith, W. T., Danville, Va., Rt. 4 
Snipes, A. R., High Point, 

123 Bragg Street 
Snipes, Luther E., Granite Falls, Rt. 2 
Snow, Brady, Mount Airy, Rt. 3 
Snow, J. A., Stanley 
Soles, A. R., Tabor City 
Soots, L. P., Goldston 
Sorrells, Lester, Franklin 
Sorrells, William L., Waynesville, 

Rt. 1 
Southers, J. H., Pisgah Forest 
Southern, W. E., Winston-Salem 
Sparks, L. E., Moxley 
Spivey, E. L., Charlotte, 

220 W. Kingston Ave. 
Sprinkle, A. P., Asheville, Rt. 4 
Sprinkle, E. F., Marshall, Rt. 1 
Sprinkle, W. B., Morganton, 

225 Hogan Street 
Stafford, I. K., Buie's Creek 
Stair, Geo. R., Enfield 
Staley, T. E., Albemarle, Rt. 1 
Stallings, T. C, Concord 
Stallings, M. W, Gastonia 
Stanberry, J. S., Hayesville 
Stanberry, Thomas, Beech Creek 
Standi, J. N., Rocky Mount, Rt. 1 
Stancil, R. T., Garner 
Stancil, W. D., Kenly, Rt. 2 
Stanfield, C. H., Burlington, Rt. 2 
Stankwytch, R. A., Lumberton, Rt. 4 
Stanley, J. H., Wilmington, 

Box 1661 
Starnes, J. N., Gastonia 
Starnes, Nane, Asheville, 

29 Eola Street 
Stegall, J. F., Jonesboro 
Steen, T. Harold, Concord, Rt. 2 
Stephens, A. P., Burlington 
Stephens, G. Van, Warsaw 
Stephens, W. R., Elizabeth City, 

704 Hunter St. 
Stephenson, W. A., Charlotte, 

1922 Rozelle Ferry Road 
Stevenson, J. S., Pores Knob 
Stevens, Chas. E., Mount Gilead 
Stevens, Chas. H., Winston-Salem, 

432 S. Broad St. 
Stevens, N. L., Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Stewart, E. R., Windsor, Rt. 2 
Stiles, Fred, Murphy, Rt. 2, Box 180 
Stimsou, J. F., Southern Pines 
Stinson, Clyde P., Goldston 
Stoudemire, A. T., Cleveland 
Street, J. L., Nebo 
Strickland, B. M., Forest City, Rt. 1 
Strickland, C. M., Greensboro, 

1111 Walnut Street 
Strickland, H. S., Wilmington, Rt. 1 
Strickland, M. W., Tabor City 
Strickland, R. W., Whiteville, Rt. 2 



Stroupe, S. M., Granite Falls 
Stroup, H. M., Denton 
Stroup, S. A., Granite Falls 
Suel, Woody, Spruce Pine 
Sullivan, C. E., Woodsdale 
Sullivan, E. F., Hickory, Rt. 2 
Sullivan, R. C, Charlotte, 

2904 Morson Ave. 
Summerlin, J. O., Marshall, Box 484 
Summers, E. S., Concord, 

49 North Spring St. 
Suttle, J. W., Shelby 
Sutzer, Fred, Milton 
Swain, D. G, Jonesville 
Swett, T. M., Rowland, Rt. 1 
Swicegood, M. C, Clemmons 
Swiney, G. M., Burlington 
Swinson, A. J., High Point, Box 402 
Swinson, J. E., Hanes 
Swinson, J. T., High Point, Rt. 4 
Tarlton, W. V., Concord, 342 Kerr St. 
Taylor, A. K., Independence, Va. 
Taylor, B. R., Fayetteville 
Taylor, C. L., Albemarle 
Taylor, J. Ned, Bessemer City 
Taylor, R. J., Charlotte, Rt. 8, 

Box 330 
Teague, C. W., Wendell 
Teague, E. N., Fayetteville, 

1102 Hillsboro Street 
Teague, E. R., Durham, Route 4 
Teague, G. C, Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Teague, Jarvis W., Cove Creek 
Teague, J. U., Powellsville 
Teague, N. C, Lexington, Rt. 3 
Teel, Z. B., Durham, 2317 East Main 

Street 
Temple, D. L., Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Thomas, LeRoy A., Weaverville, 

Rt. 1 
Thomason, B. W., Brevard 
Thompson, Coy L., Altamahaw 
Thompson, D. C, New Hope 
Thornburg, Edward, Mount Airy 
Tilley, G. V., Chapel Hill 
Tilley, John L., Candler, Rt. 2 
Todd, L. L., Bladenboro 
Townsend, Carl M., Raleigh, 

2004 Glenwood Avenue 
Townsend, Fred, Culberson 
Trammel, Chas. B., Troy 
Treadaway, Walter, Wadesboro 
Tribble, T. J., Burlington, Rt. 1 
Triplett, Carl, Mountain City, Tenn. 
Trueblood, C. H., Seaboard 
Truett, James L., Andrews 
Truett, W. T., Culberson 
Tucker, George A., Greensboro, Rt. 1 
Turner, B. S., Winston-Salem, Rt. 7 
Turner, E. W., Mocksville, Rt. 3 
Turner, G. S., Chalybeate Springs 
Turner, James B., Laurenburg 



Annual of Session 1943 



247 



Turner, J. Clyde, Greensboro, 

2601 West Market St. 
Turner, M. M., Zebulon, Rt. 1 
Turner, W. D., Winston-Salem, Rt. 2 
Tyson, Joel S., Kannapolis, 

703 Walter Street 
Ulmer, O. S., Newton, 308 West 

Seventh Street 
Ulrich, E. E., Lake Waccamaw, 

Box 66 
Underwood, A. G., Monroe, Rt. 5 
Underwood, Jarvis, Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Underwood, J. L., Asheville, Rt. 3 
Underwood, P. A., Pembroke 
Upchurch, C. A., Raleigh, 

313 E. Lane Street 
Upchurch, E. C., Wake Forest 
Upchurch, H. C, Cary, Rt. 1 
Upton, C. R., Canton 
Usry, E. G., Oxford 
Vaughan, L. B., Slater, S. C. 
Vaughan, R. B., Marshall, Rt. 1 
Vause, Chas. B., Chimney Rock 
Vehaun, W. S., Asheville 
Vess, L. O., Swannanoa 
Vinson, J. I., Dillard, Ga., Rt. 1 
Vipperman, J. L., Dallas 
Wade, J. C, Blairsville, Ga., 

Star Route 
Wagner, Felix, Mount Airy 
Waldrop, H. E., Shelby, 409 North 

Washington St. 
Walker, E. A., Clinton, Rt. 2 
Walker A E. M., Tuxedo 
Walker, C. W., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Walker, J. M, Stovall 
Wallace, George H., High Point, 

Rt. 3 
Wall, R. E, Elizabeth City 
Wall, Zeno, Shelby 
Walls, Fred, Fairview 
Walters, H. Lloyd, Marshville, 

Box 49 
Walters, T. E., Ridgecrest 
Walton, J. O., Wilmington, 

718 South 5th St. 
Walton, W. H., Salisbury, Rt. 5 
Ward, W. W., Elizabethton, Tenn. 
Warfford, Walter L., Carthage 
Warren, Casper C, Charlotte, 

First Baptist Church 
Waters, A. R., Catawba 
Waters, C. S., Wake Forest 
Watson, E. C, Jr., Garland 
Watson, J. N., Black Mountain 
Watson, T. D., Bryson City 
Watts, A. E., Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Watts, J. N., Mars Hill, Rt. 1 
Watts, S. H., Stanley 
Watts, S. I., Boomer 
Wayland, John T., Durham, 

1105 Knott Street 



Weatherman, John, State Road 
Weaver, J. M., Buie's Creek 
Weaver, R. H., Valdese 
Weeks, Howard L., Reidsville 
Welch, C. C, Glenville 
Welch, William, Cherokee 
Wells, E. L., Edenton 
Wesson, D. C, Old Fort 
West, Guy, Alexander, Rt. 1 
West, R. L., Sparta. 
West, R. W., Andrews, Rt. 1 
West, W. F., Roxboro 
Weston, W. A., Benson, Rt. 2 
Wheeler, C. C, Merry Oaks 
Whisenhunt, Eph, Clayton 
Whisnant, J. D., Raeford 
White, E. P., Rutherfordton, Rt. 1 
White, G. D., Statesville, Rt. 5 
White, Harvey, Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Whitehurst, B. A'larshall, Roanoke 

Rapids 
Whitley, B. G., Greensboro, 

1200 Elwell Avenue 
Whitlock, W. H., Brevard, Rt. 1 
Whitted, Alvis M., Richlands 
Wiggs, Jas. E., Greensboro, 

1515 Grove Street 
Wilbanks, Doc, Dallas 
Wilkie, E. Cleveland, Robersonville 
Wilkins, J. A., Pembroke, Rt. 1 
Williams, C. B., Shiloh 
Williams, E. G., Goldsboro, 

119 N. Georgia Ave. 
Williams, Joe, Canton, Rt. 2 
Williams, J. D., Tarboro, Box 820 
Williams, L. R., Maiden 
Williams, R. W., Dillard, Ga., Rt. 1 
Williams, T. H., Raleigh, Rt. 2 
Williams, Wm. Harrison, Charlotte, 

1115 South Boulevard 
Williamson, W. D., Salisbury, 

1515 North Main St. 
Willis, Garland, Bryson City 
Willis, J. B., Hamlet 
Wilson, W. Gordon, Marion, Cross 

Mill Station 
Wilson, Paul, Morganton, Rt. 3 
Wilson, Ralph A., Burlington, Rt. 2 
W'ilson, R. L., Ayden 
Wilson, S. B., Creswell 
Wilson, Woodrow W., Elkin 
Winkler, H. M., Todd 
Wood, A. B., Charlotte, 

2215 Plaza Road 
Wood, Harry D., Jr., Angier 
Woodall, W. F., Maiden 
Woodcock, Wilson W., Greensboro, 

908 Forest Avenue 
Woodard, J. N., Hazelwood 
Woody, W. S., Spruce Pine 
Worley, C. A., Barnard 
Worley, S. G, Canton, Rt. 1 



248 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Worrell, P. T., Yanceyville 
Wyatt, Emanuel, Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Yarborough, A. F., Milton 
Yates, J. Clyde, Charlotte, 

1409 Allen Street 
Yates, J. V., Crickett 
Yonce, G. H., Andrews 



Young, C. S., Lexington, 

80S Radford Ave. 
Young, E. D., Greensboro, 

Denim Branch 
Young, F. L., Maxton 
Younger, L. T., New Hope 



Ministers Ordained But Not Active in the Pastorate at the Time 
of Publication of this Volume 



Abee, J. O., Connelly Springs 
Abernethy, Martin, Newton 
Absher, A. F., Kannapolis 
Absher, J. M., North Wilkesboro 
Adams, A. M., Santeetlah 
Adams, J. H., Asheville 
Adams, J. Z., Traphill 
Adams, Jesse, North Wilkesboro 
Adkins, C. C, Ramseytown 
Alderman, J. O., Chapel Hill 
Aldridge, J. G., Landis 
Allen, C. L., Waynesville 
Allen, James, Rominger 
Allen, J. M., Bushnell 
Almond, H. J., Mill Springs 
Anderson, J. R., Stiles 
Anthony, W. W., Whittier 
Armstrong, Neill, Gastonia 
Arrington, Ellis, Hazelwood 
Arrowood, Horace, Arden 
Austin, L. F., Oakboro 
Bailey, C. H., Marshall 
Baines, J. J., Alarka 
Baird, J. A., Charlotte 
Baity, A. K., North Wilkesboro 
Baker, Clinton, Asheboro 
Baker, J. M., Asheville 
Baker, R., Zeb, Lenoir 
Barbee, J. R., Rocky Mount 
Barber, P. A., Gastonia, Pinkney 

Station 
Barker, B. H., Roaring River 
Barker, W. F., Grassy Creek 
Barnes, L. C, Cerro Gordo 
Barnes, L. E., Hiddenite 
Barnette, J. C., North Wilkesboro 
Barnette, J. W., Lenoir 
Barnette, P. C, Yadkin Valley 
Beach, W. R., Winston-Salem 
Beck, C. L, Balsam 
Beck, D.'E., Webster 
Beck, L. P., Badin 
Bell, W. A., St. Pauls 
Bennett, Hubert, Greensboro 
Bennett, J. P., Asheville 
Bennett, S. G., Morganton 
Berry, Ralph, Icard 
Biles, H. C, Ellerbe 
Billings, H. P., Jamestown 
Birchfield, D. F., Gastonia 
Bishop, Edgar, Sylva 



Bishop, Jas., Gay 
Bishop, Paul, Kings Mountain 
Blackburn, M. D., Lenoir 
Blackburn, Wiley, Jefferson 
Blackwelder, H. T., Concord 
Blanton, W. A., Shelby 
Blevins, E., Grassy Creek 
Blevins, Jewel, Grassy Creek 
Blevins, W. M., Celo 
Boley, Ernest, Balsam Grove 
Bolick, W. P., Lenoir 
Bolton, R. L., Chapel Hill 
Bond, W. E.j Varina 
Boney, L. B. r Durham 
Bookout, R. A., Grover 
Boone, Cuther, Burnsville 
Bostic, E. M., Saluda 
Bostic, W. D., Shelby 
Bowden, W. C, St. Pauls 
Bradford, Monroe, Bee Log 
Bradley, W. L., Etna 
Bradley, S. A., Asheville 
Bradshaw, W. M., Hudson 
Brandon, S. O., Buie's Creek 
Braswell, W. A., Montezuma 
Brendle, C. M., Hayesville 
Brewer, Grady L., Star 
Brewington, C. D., Pembroke 
Brewington, Joseph, Dunn 
Brewington, M. L., Clinton 
Brisson, W. M., Dublin 
Bristol, Ira, Collettsville 
Britt, D. C, Whiteville 
Brooks, P. C, Roseboro 
Brooks, J. C, Granite Falls 
Brookshire, C. O., Belmont 
Brown, James, Burlington 
Brown, W. T., Shelby 
Bryant, Spivey, Fairmont 
Bryant, Tern, Reidsville 
Bryson, A. C, Balsam 
Buchanan, Fonzer, Spruce Pine 
Buchanan, H., Sylva 
Bullis, H. A., North Wilkesboro 
Bumgarner, A., Granite Falls 
Burcham, John, Roaring River 
Burdock, Albert, Baltimore 
Burkett, H. M., Jefferson 
Burleson, Raymond, Estatoe 
Burnett, Grade, Parrish 
Burns, J. R., Drexel 



Annual of Session 1943 



249 



Burrus, G. E., Rockford 

Butler, A. L., Ewart 

Byrd, Albert, North Wilkesboro 

Byrd, R. L., St. Pauls 

Byrd, Fred, Black Mountain 

Byerly, J. W., Buie's Creek 

Byerly, W. H., Lenoir 

Cable, Lee, Fontana 

Cable, Martin, Proctor 

Caldwell, Henry, Canton 

Callahan, Glenn, West Asheville 

Call, Andrew, North Wilkesboro 

Call, C. M., Wilkesboro 

Campbell, J. W., Bina 

Campbell, W. T., Fuquay Springs 

Candler, T. M., Rusk 

Cannady, Carlus, Hope Mills 

Carlton, J. T., Jonesville 

Carpenter, C. A.j Spruce Pine 

Carringer, Charlie, Robbinsville 

Carson, W. L., Weaverville 

Carter, A. D., Garland 

Cashwell, C. H., Fayetteville 

Cates, T. K., Bryson City 

Caudill, C. M., Hays 

Caulder, W. M., Cerro Gordo 

Chambers, Caney, Asheville 

Chapman, Johnnie, Gastonia 

Chavis, C. J., Pembroke 

Chavis, John D., Laurinburg 

Chavis, Z. R., Pembroke 

Cheek, L. C, Chapel Hill 

Church, A. B., Boone 

Clark, B. F., Kannapolis 

Clark, Ellis, Swepsonville 

Clark, Everett, Marshall 

Clark, Kenneth, Durham 

Clark, L. F., Canton 

Clonninegar, John, Kings Mountain 

Cockerham, T. J., Crumpler 

Coffey, Charles, High Point 

Coffey, G. G., Lenoir 

Coffey, W. E., Buffalo Cove 

Cogburn, T. M., Canton 

Cohn, H. D., Candler 

Collier, S. M., Charlotte 

Combs, J. A., Thomasville 

Comer, D. H., Hickory 

Comer, W. T., Stony Point 

Conner, Tom, Rutherfordton 

Cook, Jess, Minneapolis 

Cook, Robin, Minneapolis 

Cook, R. C, Globe 

Cook, Roy J., Bryson City 

Cook, T. C, Bakersville 

Cook, W. N., Webster 

Coone, C. M., Charlotte 

Cooper, W. F., Trap Hill 

Cope, C. M., Crumpler 

Copeland, J. E., Colerain 

Coren, J. A., Brevard 

Cornwell, R. C, Grandview 



Cowan, G. N., Rocky Mount, 

757 Falls Road 
Cox, R. E., Durham 
Cox, W. H., Wilmington 
Cranford, D. T., Harris 
Crawford, Lee, Shelby 
Crisp, Pearlie, Bushnell 
Crutchfield, T. S., Albemarle 
Culler, E. M., Mount Airy 
Curry, G. W., Benham 
Dameron, Marvin, Boiling Springs 
Danner, T. T., Valle Crucis 
Davenport, J. E. M., Pineville 
Davis, B. M., Toecane 
Davis, L. A., Alexander 
Davis, Theo. B., Zebulon 
Davis, W. H., Hendersonville 
Day, O. C, Nantahala 
Deal, O. E., Taylorsville 
Deanton, Paul, Shannon 
Dehart, Wint, Tellico 
Deitz, T. F., Sylva 
Dellinger, O. C, Collettsville 
Deloache, B. F., Graham 
Dendy, F. E., Highlands 
Denny, Gilmer, Pinnacle 
Denny, Jesse, Apple Grove 
Dix, O. P., High Point 
Dodd, W. H., Ridgecrest 
Dollinger, R. L., Sturgills 
Donaho, H. E., Burnsville 
Dorsett, G. D., Greensboro 
Dotson, Roy, Boone 
Dove, A. H., Bladenboro 
Dowell, C. L., Wake Forest 
Driver, J. E., Lenoir 
Dry, Sam, Kannapolis 
Duncan, V. E., Semora 
Dunning, W. A., Durham 
Edwards, Emory, Bee Log 
Edwards, W. L., Barnardsville 
Eggers, Blain, Creston 
Eggers, Carter, Creston 
Eller, E. A., Grassy Creek 
Eller, LeRoy, Moravian Falls 
Eller, V. G., Purlear 
Elrod, J. M., Granite Falls 
Ensle}', Herman, Cherokee 
Eubanks, M. E., Maysville 
Evans, C. R., Maggie 
Farrington, B. H., Colfax 
Farthing, E. J., Sugar Grove 
Fenwick, Frank, Asheville 
Finch, A., Mt. Airy 
Fizer, J. R., Charlotte 
Flack, O. R., Bostic 
Fletcher, B. D., Mount Airy 
Fletcher, J. F., North Wilkesboro 
Forbes, R. G., Ahoskie 
Foster, J. H., Wilmington 
Frazier, Drewry, Red Oak 
Freeman, J. Grady, Leicester 



250 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Freeman, Hugh, Belmont 
Friday, C. F., Taylorsville 
Frye, F. W., Jonesville 
Fugate, Ben C, Cove Creek 
Furgeson, W. H., Albemarle 
Galimore, A. R., Wake Forest 
Gardner, S. E., Asheville 
Gentry, Glen, Elk Park 
Gentry, J. H., West Jefferson 
George, Goliath, Cherokee 
Gill, Everett, Wake Forest 
Gillespie, W. N., Rosman 
Gilliam, C. W., Jonesville 
Goforth, C. J., Forest City 
Gold, W. M., Ellenboro 
Goode, J. M., Boiling Springs 
Goodman, C. F., West Jefferson 
Gooch, E. D., Oxford 
Gough, W. H., Pinnacle 
Grant, J. H., Flats 
Grant, M. D., Swannanoa 
Green, Clayton, Shull's Mills 
Green, J. R., Hillsboro 
Green, J. Y., Asheville 
Green, R. W., Green's Creek 
Green, W. C, Laxton 
Grice, E. S., Gastonia 
Griffin, Gaston, Bryson City 
Griffin, R. A., Mount Airy 
Griffin, W. M., Alexander 
Grigg, W. L., Jefferson 
Griggs, J. M., Jefferson 
Grindstaff, Roy, Spruce Pine 
Gunter, Wayne, Bryson City 
Haas, L. P., Rhodhiss _ 
Hagaman, J. P., Lenoir 
Hair, P. H., West Jefferson 
Hall, E. O., Bushnell 
Hall, J. T., Lake Toxoway 
Hall, M. L., Murphy 
Hamm, W. M., Laurel Springs 
Hammonds, Chesley, Fairmont 
Hammonds, J. E., Shannon 
Hampton, C. G., West Asheville 
Hanks, Uriah, Springfield 
Hannon, S. E., Carthage 
Hardin, D. C, Rutherfordton 
Hargett, S. M., Rutherfordton 
Harper, Thos. Biltmore 
Harris, C. L., Mount Airy 
Harris, Carl, Wake Forest 
Harris, John, Argura 
Harris, J. F., Manchester 
Harris, J. S., Concord 
Harris, L. B., Mooresboro 
Harris, Ralph, Albemarle 
Harron, C. D., Weaverville 
Harward, G. N., Chapel Hill 
Hayes, C. C, Mount Airy 
Hayes, T. M., Nathan's Creek 
Haynes, Ralph, Forest City 
Haynes, W. L., Forest City 
Heatherly, Ben, Canton 



Heatherly, T. C, Candler 
Hedrick, Leslie, Robbinsville 
Heilig, J. A., Concord 
Henderson, J. K., Scotland Neck 
Hensley, J. E., Celo 
Herring, A. C, Bladenboro 
Herring, R. H., Zebulon 
Hester, J. M., Elizabethtown 
Hice, W. H., Granite Falls 
Hickman, G. T., Winnabow 
Hicks, J. G., Kings Mountain 
Hicks, J. J., Kings Mountain 
Higgins, John, Wilkesboro 
Hildebran, Julius, Hickory 
Hill, W. E., Caroleen 
Hill, J. W. P., Forest City 
Hipps, J. B., Asheville 
Hocutt, Aaron, Wilmington 
Hodges, James M., Blowing Rock 
Hodges, J. L., Rutherfordton 
Hogsed, Boyd, Hayesville 
Holcomb, W. E., Statesville 
Holden, F. H., Pisgah Forest 
Honeycutt, W. W., Forest City 
Hooks, E. A., Raleigh 
Horn, G. P., Rutherfordton 
Home, Paul, Creston 
Howell, B. D., Mocksville 
Hoxit, Vessie, Wolf Mountain 
Hudgins, D. J., Leicester 
Hudson, Albert, Casar 
Hudson, L. L., Oxford 
Huffman, M. A., Icard 
Hughes, Durham, Shelby 
Humphrey, D. B., Lumberton 
Humphrey, H. B., Kannapolis 
Humphries, F. D., Durham 
Huneycutt, George A., Salisbury 
Hunt, J. E., Raynham 
Hunt, W. G., Lumberton 
Hutchens, Henry, Winston-Salem 
Hurley, W. L., Crumpler 
Hurst, W. T., Pittsboro 
Hutchens, C. C, Mount Airy 
Hutchins, E. L., Greensboro 
Hyde, O., Stecoah 
Inman, Fred, Waynesville 
Isley, James, Swannanoa 
Ives, D. H., Concord 
Jackson, Bernice, Oxford 
Jacobs, R. B., Pembroke 
Jacobs, T. O. L., Fayetteville 
James, W. C, Mount Airy 
Jamison, Thas, Sylva 
Jarrett, J. F., Linwood 
Jarvis, N. T., Roaring River 
Jenkins, H., Bryson City 
Jenks, L. D., Neuse 
Johnson, A. A., Candler 
Johnson, E. O., St. Pauls 
Johnson, Noah, Meat Camp 
Johnson, K. B., Weaverville 
Johnson, W. L., Hamptonville 



Annual of Session 1943 



251 



Jolly, J. R., Jonesville 
Jones, J. T., Hendersonville 
Jones, Oscar M., Raleigh 
Jones, S. A., North Wilkesboro 
Jones, Sam, White Plains 
Jones, T. A., Forest City 
Jones, Theodore, Andrews 
Jones, Woodrow, White Plains 
Jordan, Alphonso, Raleigh 
Jordan, B. C, Roaring River 
Jumper, Ute, Whittier 
Justice, A. J., Hendersonville 
Kendrick, R. G., Durham 
Keeler, E. C, Dunn 
Kelly, Geo. M., Magnolia 
Kelly, W. M., Wilmington 
Keller, L. N., Fleetwood 
Key, H. R., Mount Airy 
Keys, F. L., Robbinsville 
Kilby, John, Wilkesboro 
Kilpatrick, A. F., Candler 
King, J. D., Cane River 
King, R. E., Thomasville 
King, T. H., Wake Forest 
Knotts, W. E., Wadesboro 
Koerber, Fred, Greensboro 
Lake, Leford, Franklin 
Lanning, T. D., Leicester 
Lanning, H. O., Lexington 
Lancaster, R. F., Boiling Springs 
Larkins, J. D., Kinston 
Lassiter, A. G., Star 
Lawson, H. O., Pinnacle 
Leatherwood, F. H., Waynesville 
Ledford, Lester, Prentiss 
Ledford, R. B.^ Hayesville 
Lee, D. S., Lenoir 
Lee, L. C, Durham 
Leggett, G. D., Windsor 
Lennon, R. S., Wake Forest 
Letterman, Theo, Spruce Pine 
Lewis, Herman, Bolton 
Lineberger, C. A., Alexis 
Liner, H. G, Concord 
Litterel, Charlie, Marshall 
Little, Luther, Charlotte 
Livingston, E. A., Staley 
Locust, Arthur, Bryson City 
Lowery, Edd, Altapass 
Lowery, E. L., Lawndale 
Lowery, S. S., Pembroke 
Lucas, R. H., Plymouth 
Lynch, W. C, Rutherfordton 
Lyon, J. F., Traphill 
Lyon, T. M., Traphill 
McAlister, T. G, Caroleen 
McCall, Qyde, Lake Toxoway 
McCall, Thomas, Highlands 
McCarter, Jesse, Raleigh 
McCarter, W. P., Mocksville 
McCarry, W. E., Charlotte 
McCoy, D. C, Eton 
McCracken, R. P., Clyde 



McCurray, Arthur, Bryson City 

McDaniel, C. L., Connelly Springs 

McDaniel, E. L., Ellenboro 

McDaniel, J. R., Buie's Creek 

McDowell, B. S., High Point 

McDuffie, J. F., Chapel Hill 

McElreath, F. M., Leicester 

McFalls, W. T., Leicester 

McGee, Clifford, Estatoe 

McGuire, C. W.j Asheville 

McGuire, J. T., Altapass 

McGuire, V. V., Asheville 

McHorne, C. J., Asheville 

Mclntyre, S. L., Oakboro 

McKeithan, W. H., Southport 

McKinney, Vestor, Little Switzerland 

McNeal, L. P., Wilmington 

Mack, Bis, Micaville 

Mainwaring, C. W., Hendersonville 

Maness, D. T., Hemp 

Mann, Marvin T., Canton 

Mann, J. R., Carthage 

Mann, Lester G., Durham 

Maier, M. A., Thomasville 

Marshburn, Earl, Richlands 

Marshall, O. N., Elizabeth City 

Martin, A. C, Forest City 

Martin, W. N., Candler 

Mason, J. P., Asheville 

Massengale, J. C, Cowarts 

Massengale, Whitney, Argura 

Massie, William, Canton 

Matheney, H. G., Charlotte 

Matherly, W. F., Greensboro 

Matheson, M., Robbinsville 

Mathis, A. S., Cycle 

Mathis, B., Jonesville 

Matthews, C. H., Asheville 

Matthews, G. S., Canton 

May, Geo. W., Red Oak 

Mayberry, O. B., North Wilkesboro 

Maynor, L. A., Pembroke 

Medford, A. T., Canton 

Medlin, J. M._, Charlotte 

Melton, Sterling, Argura 

Merritt, R. P., Kannapolis 

Metcalf, Byrd, Swannanoa 

Mikles, C. B., East Bend 

Miller, A. L., Wallace 

Miller, C. L., West Asheville 

Miller, D. L., Hudson 

Miller, Finley, Milan 

Miller, James A., North Wilkesboro 

Miller, R. B., Hudson 

Miller, Smith, Jefferson 

Mills, George, Dillsboro 

Milner, E. W., Sanford 

Minton, Clarence, North Wilkesboro 

Mitchiner, J. F., Franklinton 

Mizelle, J. C, Currie 

Monteith, S. B., Bryson City 

Monton, B. L., Buck 

Moore, H. C, Ridgecrest 



252 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Moore, J. W., Gilreath 
Moore, M. M., Hendersonville 
Moore, S. F., Fairview 
Moretz, A. E., Boone 
Morgan, Paul, Franklin 
Morgan, S. L., Wake Forest 
Morris, D. P., Norwood 
Morrison, W. M., Roaring River 
Moss, J. F., Kings Mountain 
Mull, J. O., Vale 
Mullis, G. L., Mount Holly 
Mullis, H. K., Wilmington 
Mullis, W. O., Jefferson 
Mumford, E. F., High Point 
Murray, J. F., Reidsville 
Murray, L. B., State Road 
Myers, Gus, Cycle 
Ned, Sigley, Whittier 
Nelson, J. H., Lenoir 
Newton, J. D., Thomasville 
Nichols, J. B., Southern Pines 
Nielson, A. J., Hendersonville 
Nix, _W. V., Trap Hill 
Norville, J. M., Boiling Springs 
Gates, D. E., Greensboro 
O'Hara, J. W., Candler 
O'Neill, G. G., Rutherfordton 
Osborne, Angle, Sylva 
Osborne, George, Cricket 
Osborne, Jesse, North Wilkesboro 
Osborne, Ray, Fig 
Owen, Blye, Wolf Mountain 
Owen, D. C, Lake Toxoway 
Owen, D. L., Balsam Grove 
Owen, Julius N., Lake Toxoway 
Owle, Enoch, Cherokee 
Padgett, Rush, Shelby 
Page, J. M., Raleigh 
Parker, G. M., Tuckaseigee 
Parker, Vasco, Hickory 
Parnell, Eli, Norwood 
Parsons, Frank, Toecane 
Partnor, C. W., Manchester 
Passmore, P. H., Flats 
Patterson, C. G., Robbinsville 
Payne, J. B., Lincolnton 
Payne, T. E., Hudson 
Peeden, V. D., Greensboro 
Pendleton, E. R., Brevard 
Pennell, F. A., Kannapolis 
Penley, E. G., Globe 
Perkinson, S. J., Asheville 
Perry, H. J., Raleigh 
Peterson, J. A., Turkey 
Philbeck, J. A., Cherryville 
Phillips, Eugene, Toliver 
Phillips, Hiram, Toliver 
Phillips, J. H., Andrews 
Phillips, M. B., Toast 
Phillips, M. S., Lenoir 
Phillips, S. E., Idlewild 
Phillips, Joe, Pinola 



Phillips, Wm. C, Warsaw 
Philpott, Harry, Lexington 
Philyow, Pink D., Collettsville 
Phipps, Paul, Crumpler 
Phipps, Roy, Asheville 
Pickler, C. L., Albemarle 
Plybon, Chas. T., Carthage 
Ponder, N. L., Brevard 
Porch, Jeter, Rhodhiss 
Powell, E. G., Gastonia 
Powers, Elmer, Tuckerdale 
Pressley, Harvey, Skyland 
Prestwood, R. L., Hudson 
Price, John E., Canton 
Privette, J. E., Union Grove 
Privette, G. W., Roaring River 
Propst, Mark, Gastonia 
Pruett, W. M., Hazelwood 
Pruett, Gar, Springfield 
Pugh, R. L., New Bern 
Purvis, S. L., Acme 
Raines, F. A., Rosman 
Rash, Carrus, Marshall 
Ray, Barnette, Celo 
Ray, W. E., Burnsville 
Redmon, G. R., Asheville 
Redmon, W. H., Kings Mountain 
Reece, A. V., Hendersonville 
Reece, Thomas, Jonesville 
Reed, Green, Toliver 
Reid, B. W., Tryon 
Rhodes, C. G., Asheville 
Rice, Earl, Marshall 
Rice, Howard, Marshall 
Rich, Remus, Connelly Springs 
Riddle, Edd, Cane River 
Riddle, J. L., Mocksville 
Riddle, Roy, Cane River 
Rivenbark, Latt, Rockingham 
Robbins, J. W., Sharpsburg 
Robbins, Ronald, Lenoir 
Robbins, T. S., Deep Gap 
Roberson, Burgar, Marshall 
Roberson, W. L., Burlington 
Roberts, Connell, Mars Hill 
Roberts, David, Caroleen 
Roberts, J. W., Asheville 
Roberts, H. M., Gastonia 
Robertson, Elzie, Bee Log 
Robinson, Roland, Lake Toxoway 
Rogers, James, Stecoah 
Rogers, L. J., Canton 
Rogers, W. T., Cullowhee 
Rose, Theo, Lake Toxoway 
Rowland, Fred, Whittier 
Rowland^ Lloyd, Bryson City 
Rufty, J. L., Taylor sville 
Ruppe, J. J., Rutherfordton 
Sampson, W. J., Lumberton 
Sawyer, C. E., Biltmore 
Seism, L. B., Kings Mountain 
Scott, Erwin : Canton 



Annual of Session 1943 



253 



Scruggs, Gordon, Waynesville 

Sears, H. C, Apex 

Secrest, David, Lenoir 

Secrest, Eugene, Drexel 

Sentell, R. E., Canton 

Shaver, J. M., Granite Falls 

Shepherd, D. L., Smethport 

Shew, Tom, Lenoir 

Shoemaker, T. P., Lenoir 

Shook, Frank, Bryson City 

Shufford, Aaron, Celo 

Simms, H. A., Kannapolis 

Sisk, C. T., Bryson City 

Sitton, F. J., Bryson City 

Slagle, Jesse, Marshall 

Smart, B. B., Ellenboro 

Smith, A. J., Stiles 

Smith, C. C., Durham 

Smith, C. R., Kernersville 

Smith, Daniel, Canton 

Smith, H. H., Deep Gap 

Smith, R. C, Cherokee 

Smith, Sibbald, Cherokee 

Smith, W. E., Rutherfordton 

Smith, W. T., Bryson City 

Snow, J. B., Statesville 

Snyder, G. C., Sylva 

Solomon, D. F., Cameron 

Sorrells, A. P., Union Mills 

Sparks, J. Y., Toecane 

Spaulding, J. H., Murfreesboro 

Spillman, B. W., Kinston 

Squirrel, Sheppard, Cherokee 

Staley, A. A., Wilbar 

Stepp, C. N., Canton 

Stevens, Sanford, Rutherfordton 

Stillwell, Jason, Hickory 

Stroud, I. T., Wake Forest 

Sudderth, L. W., Montezuma 

Sullins, David, Altapass 

Sullivan, J. A., Wilmington 

Surrette, Riley, Candler 

Summey, M. E., Rosland 

Summey, M. M., Black Mountain 

Suther, M. E., Wilmington 

Swann, S. G., Statesville 

Swayngin, Ed, Waynesville 

Tanner, M. T., Wake Forest 

Tate, L. R., Statesville 

Tatum, W. Roger, Wilmington 

Taylor, E. C, Red Springs 

Teague, E. A., Gastonia 

Teague, J. L., Hickory 

Tedder, D. A., Shelby 

Testerman, Luther, Amy 

Thomas, J. N., Burnsville 

Thomas, Leonard, Boiling Springs 

Thomason, J. A., Hamptonville 

Thompson, Thos. E., Hendersonville 

Thompson,. T. M., Whiteville 

Thorne, J. L., Rutherfordton 

Threat, Tilroe, Polkton 

Tomblin, C. C, Spindale 



Tothrow, S. A., Andrews 
Trippee, R. E., Kannapolis 
Trivett, J. R., Creston 
Trivett, J. S., Fleetwood 
Trivett, W. G, West Jefferson 
Turbyfill, W. M., Clarissa 
Turner, Carl, Graham 
Turner, L. S., Concord 
Turner, Wiley, Hamptonville 
Turpen, G. L., Yellow Creek 
Tyner, J. L.j Whiteville 
Vaden, Chas. F., Raleigh 
Vanoy, F. Gaither, Toliver 
Wacaster, Lee, Cherryville 
Waddell, Lee, Grassy Creek 
Waldrop, J. J., Vale 
Walker, W. H., Morganton 
Wallin, Stephen, Marshall 
Walton, Rolie, Wilmington 
Warren, John F., Wilmington 
Washburn, D. G., Shelby 
Watkins, W. C, Bryson City 
Watson, G. M., Boone 
Watson, Thos., Lenoir 
Waugh, W. H., Jr., Burlington 
Weaver, Carl, Gastonia 
Webster, J. A., Taylorsville 
Weisner, R. C, Olin 
Welborn, Seldon, Mount Airy 
Wells, John, North Wilkesboro 
West, Adolphus, Brevard 
West, Paul, Raleigh 
West, W. A., Andrews 
Wheeler, Fred, Selo 
Whitaker, L. R., Shelby 
White, J. P., Maggie 
White, Wade, Mars Hill 
Wild, Joe, Marshall 
Wiggins, David, Waynesville 
Williams, David, Waynesville 
Williams, Gardner, Yellow Creek 
Williams, J. G., Jackson Springs 
Williams, Lester, Aquone 
Williams, T. N., Raleigh 
Williams, W. A., Brevard 
Willis, B. J., Wilmington 
Willis, D. G., Weaverville 
Willis, John, Bee Log 
Willis, R. T., Jr., Morehead City 
Willoughby, R. A., Lumberton 
Wilson, Paul, Morganton 
Wilson, Radford, Scaley 
Wilson, T. O., Cane River 
Womack, P., Morganton 
Wood, Grant, Gneiss 
Woodruff, W. E., Mount Airy 
Woody, Charlie, Spruce Pine 
Woody, I. W., Ingalls 
Woody, L. W., Selma 
Wooten, E. K., Cycle 
Wyatt, Banner, North Wilkesboro 
Yale, J. W., North Wilkesboro 
Young, George P., Hickory 



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NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 



ONE-HUNDRED-FOURTEENTH 
YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
CHARLOTTE 



1944 



Annual 

of the 

Baptist State Convention 

of 

North Carolina 

One Hundred Fourteenth Annual Session 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Charlotte 
November 14-16, 1944 



Edited by 
Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The next Session will be held 

November 13-15, 1945 
First Baptist Church, Raleigh 




MRS. WESLEY NORWOOD JONES 

To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated 
by Order of the Convention 

Born in Greeneville County, Virginia, January 29, 1868, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
C. T. Bailey. She studied at Raleigh Female Institute one year; at Peace Institute five 
years; at Richmond Female Institute one year. Married Wesley N. Tones on February 6. 
1887. 

Children: Annie Bailey, Sallie Wesley Gallant, and William Bailey. 

From her young womanhood she taught a large Sunday School class; she was active 
as deaconess in her church; filling important offices in the Woman's Missionary Union of 
North Carolina and of the South. Elected in 1886, at the organization of the Central 
Committee of Missions as the first Corresponding Secretary of the North Carolina Union, 
and afterwards served as Treasurer; also was Vice-President of the Southern W.M.U.; 
State W.M.U.; President from 1916-1936; from 1936 till her death the beloved and honored 
President Emeritus. At the Golden Jubilee meeting in Richmond in 1938, the Southern 
W.M.U. presented her with a diamond set W.M.U. pin in recognition of her active par- 
ticipation in the work of the Union through fifty-two years. Her death occurred at her 
home in Raleigh on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1943. Interred in Oakwood cem- 
etery, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

"My life has been uneventful. I have just stuck to my job." "These words spoken 
by Mrs. Jones of herself," observes her friend, Mrs. J. S. Farmer, "embody the secret 
of her usefulness.' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION PAGf 

Annual, Dedicated to memory Mrs. Wesley Norwood Jones (74) facing 2 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statements, Institutions 134 

Baptist Book Store, executives of 5 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 6 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of 6 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 7 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 5 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 1C 

Biblical Recorder, directors of 7 

Campbell College, trustees of £ 

Charity and Children, directory of 7 

Chowan College, trustees of )i 

Committees: 

Allied Church League (25) 29 

Committee on Committees (6) 21 

Constitutional Changes (46) 35 

Enrollment (3) 21 

General Board, to report on report of (25) 27 

Historical Commission (25) 28 

Music (25) 28 

Order of Business (1945) (25) 28 

Place and Preacher (25) 27 

Publicity (25) 28 

Resolutions (25) 27 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (25) 28 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (25) 28 

Constitution 11 

Amendment (50) (73) 37-48 

Convention: 

Audit — Income and Disbursements (90) 83 

Debt, Convention Notes Burned (14) 24 

Directory 5 

Associational 229 

Historical Table 231 

Institutions 6, 9 

Officers, executive and administrative 5 

Officers elected: 

General Secretary ( 5 ) 21 

President (76) 49 

Vice Presidents (76) 49 

Recording Secretary (5) 21 

Statistical Secretary (5) 21 

Proceedings of (1) 21 

Sermon — Sankey A. Blanton, Wilmington (18) 25 

General Board: 

By-Laws 16 

Officers and organizations 5 

Report (85) 69 

Greetings (8) (9) 23 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 7 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 8 

Meredith College, trustees of 8 

Messengers 56 

Ministers: 

Charlotte and Neighboring Ministers recognized (11) 24 

New Ministers recognized (12) 24 

Ordained, active in pastorate 244 

Ordained, riot active in pastorate 258 

Ordained, now serving as chaplains in Armed Services 244 

Ministerial Students in colleges and seminaries 239 

Missionaries, North Carolina, on foreign field 238 

Motions: 

Re: Alcoholic Beverages (67) 46 

Re: Baptist Bible Institute (,32) 30 

■ Re : Constitutional Changes (46) 35 

Re: Truett, George W. Memorial (30) 30 

Re: Trustees, method to propose names (83) 53 

Re : Wake Forest-Meredith (49) 35 



SECTION PAGE 

"Our Dead" 54 

Pastors' Conference: 

Officers 1945 9 

Program 1944 55 

Reports: 

American Bible Society (31) 30 

Baptist Book Store (118) 131 

Baptist Colleges 

General Statistics 119 

Baptist Foundation (75) (117) 49, 129 

Baptist Hospital .'...'.(69) (114) 46^122 

Baptist Training Union (102) 104 

Biblical Recorder (33) 30 

Campbell College . (105) 114 

Church Extension (92) 90 

Committee on Committees (25) 27 

Cooperative Program (115) 127 

Education Council (87) 75 

Education, Department of Christian (100) 100 

Enrollment (4) (80) 21, 51 

Foreign Mission (27) (34) (91) 29, 33, 87 

Gardner-Webb College (106) 115 

General Board: 

Advance Report (13) (85) 24, 69 

Committee, to report on report of (58) 40 

Meetings (86) 69 

Recommendations 1944 Convention (119) 131 

General Missionaries (91) 88 

Historical Commission (53) (116) 38, 128 

Home Missions (78) (91) 49, 87 

Indian Work (78) (93) 49, 91 

Mars Hill College (107) 115 

Meredith College (108) 116 

Missions, Department of State (40) (91) 34, 87 

Negro Baptists, work of • (94) 93 

North Carolina Baptist Orphanage (39) (113) 34, 121 

Audit Summary 141 

Order of Business 1944 (7) 21 

Oteen Mission (95) 95 

Pastoral Assistance (91) 90 

Place and Preacher (57) 39 

Publicity Committee (56) 39 

Radio Committee (59) (99) 40, 99 

Resolutions Committee (81) 51 

Relief and Annuity (20) (112) 25, 121 

Sanatoriums and Samarcand (96) (97) 96, 97 

Seminaries (43) 34 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (61) 40 

Minority Report (61) 45 

Student Work (103) 109 

Sunday Schools (101) 101 

Sunday School Board (24) 27 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (72) 47 

Trustees of Convention (54) 38 

Wake Forest College (109) 117 

Wingate Junior College (110) 118 

Woman's Missionary Union (23) 25 

Ridgecrest, directory of 9 

Southern Baptist Convention, directory of 9-10 

Statistical Data: 

Associational 146 

Recapitulation 225 

General Church Activities 226 

Statistical Summary 234 

Southern Baptist Convention 1943 228 

Student Secretaries 5 

Sunday School, executives of 5 

Visitors Recognized , . (9) 23 

Wake Forest College, trustees of 9 

Woman's Missionary Union: 

Directory 237 

Executives 5 

Statistical Summary 237 



DIRECTORY OF THE CONVENTION 

I. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem President 

Arthur S. Gillespie, Wake Forest 1st Vice President 

T. P. Pruitt, Hickory 2nd Vice President 

R. Archie Ellis, Salisbury 3rd Vice President 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Charles B. Deane, Rockingham Recording Secretary 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Statistical Secretary 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh Trustee 

P. H. Wilson, Raleigh Trustee 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield Trustee 

II. OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Headquarters: Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh, N. C. 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Esther Ivey, Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Lottie Tucker, Raleigh Bookkeeper Ministers' Retirement Fund 

Miss Mary Alice Gray, Raleigh Record Keeper 

DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

Earle L. Bradley, Raleigh General Missionary 

J. C. Pipes, Route 1, Asheville General Missionary 

E. L. Spivey, 220 West Kingston Ave., Charlotte General Missionary 

Division of Sunday Schools 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Secretary 

G. W. Bullard, Raleigh Associate Secretary 

Mrs. Myra Motley, Raleigh Assistant to Secretary 

Miss Joy Wood, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Division of Baptist Training Union 

Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh Secretary 

Law M. Mobley, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

Miss Louise Paschall Junior Leader 

Miss Margaret Sparks, Raleigh Intermediate Leader * 

Miss Mary Lou Wall, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Division of Student Activities 

R. T. Howerton, Jr., Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Adelaide Charles, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Laura Durant, Greensboro Campus Secretary 

Miss Mary Lee Ernest, Greenville Campus Secretary 

Miss Marjorie Toole, Boone Campus Secretary 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Raleigh Manager 

Mrs. John M. Link, Raleigh Associate 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh Associate 

Miss Iva Sue Maddry, Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Frances Puckett Stenographer 

Mrs. Margie B. Hart Clerk- 
Mrs. P. T. Whittiugton Clerk 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh President 

Miss Mary Currin, Raleigh Executive Secretary 

Miss Ora Alf ord, Raleigh Treasurer 

Miss Kathryn Abee, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

Miss Ruth Keller, Raleigh Field Worker 

Mrs. Edna Buffaloe, Raleigh Stenographer 

Miss Lillian Ogburn, Raleigh Stenographer 

III. THE GENERAL BOARD AND ORGANIZATION 

E. N. Gardner, President, Henderson 

Clyde E. Baucom, Vice President, Wilson 

Charles B. Deane, Secretary, Rockingham 

Term Expiring 1945— Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh; S. C. Eggers, Boone; T. W. Fryer, 

New Bern; M. L. Banister, Oxford; Hubert M. Craig, Lincolnton; Fred Forester, Drexel ; 

W. W. Jones, Kannapolis; Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford; A. J. Whitley, Jr., Smithfield; 



6 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Chas. B. Trammel, Troy; Donald G. Myers, Wadesboro; E. N. Gardner, Henderson; A. B\ 
Wood, Charlotte; Mrs. R. K. Redwine, Mt. Airy; John R. Link, Mars Hill; J. R. Mor- 
gan, Waynesville. 

Term Expiring 1946— Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson; J. B. Efird, Charlotte; T. L. Cash- 
well, Gastonia; N. D. Fox, Sparta; A. B. Alderman, Snow Hill; Carey P. Herring, Fair- 
mont; Earle L. Bradley, Wilmington; W. E. Stanley, Durham; Lloyd Griffin, Edenton; 
C. F. Gore, Weldon; S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; B. G. 
Henry, Tryon; Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville; Harry Y. Gamble, Statesville; J. E. Baker, 
Burlington. 

Term Expiring 1947— W. T. Moss, Youngsville; W. A. Elam, Shelby; J. Marshall 
Walker, Stovall; G. W. Green, Spruce Pine; J. Emmett Griffin, Monroe; Miss Addie 
Mae Cook, Murphy; T. C. Johnson, Kinston; R. C. Shearin, Hickory; George Beavers, 
Apex; R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem; J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; C. Sylvester Green, 
Durham; R. F. Jarrett, Dillsboro; A. J. Buckner, Asheville; James B. Turner, Laurin- 
burg; Carl L. Ousley, Siler City. 

Executive Committee: E. N. Gardner, Chairman; M. L. Banister, Secretary; Claude F. 
Gaddy, Louis S. Gaines, W. E. Stanley, T. C. Johnson, C. Sylvester Green, Ralph A. 
Herring, ex. of. 

Committee on Missions: Clyde E. Baucom, Chairman; T. W. Fryer, Secretary ; M. 
L. Banister, S. C. Eggers, J. Marshall Walker, Fred Forester, A. B. Wood, Hubert M. 
Craig, J. B. Efird, Carey P. Herring, Harry Y. Gamble, James B. Turner. 

Committee on Training Activities: L. S. Gaines, Chairman; B. G. Henry, Secretary ; 
Mrs. R. K. Redwine, C. F. Gore, N. D. Fox, Lloyd Griffin, J. E. Baker, R. C. Shearin, 
J. Roy Clifford, Miss Addie Mae Cook, R. E. Adams, J. Emmett Griffin. 

Committee on Education: Claude F. Gaddy, Chairman; Donald G. Meyers, Secretary ; 
J. R. Morgan, John R. Link, C. Sylvester Green, T. C. Johnson, Carl L. Ousley, Charles 
B. Trammel, Howard G. Dawkins, W. T. Moss, Santford Martin, A. B. Alderman. 

Committee on Benevolence: W. E. Stanley, Chairman; S. L. Morgan, Jr., Secretary; 
A. J. Whitley, T. L. Cashwell, Earle L. Bradley, E. N. Gardner, W. W. Jones, W. A. 
Elam, A. J. Buckner, George Beavers, R. F. Jarrett, G. W. Green. 

IV. THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 12, 1919 

Organized December 15, 1919 

First meeting of Directors, November 17, 1920 

T. S. Johnston, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1945 — T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; Clarence Howell, Raleigh; Mrs. R. M. 
Squires, Wake Forest. 

Term Expiring 1946 — Earl C. James, Elkin; Joe S. Correll, Raleigh; George Pennell, 
Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1947 — R. L. Patton, Morganton; Bruce Benton, Rockingham; Grover H. 
Jones, High Point. 

Term Expiring 1948 — W. F. Marshall, Walnut Cove; Guy Carswell, Charlotte; W. E. 
Goode, Scotland, Neck. 

Term Expiring 1949 — J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; W. L. Bennett, Wadesboro; E. M. 
Johnson, Lumberton. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 17, 1920 

Chartered December 27, 1922 

Began Operations, May 28, 1923 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent, Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 

J. S. Lynch, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 1945 — E. F. Tullock, Winston-Salem; W. K. McGee, Thomasville; 
Irving E. Carlyle, Winston-Salem; O. M. Mull, Shelby; B. B. Dougherty, Boone; R. L. 
Wall, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1946— Mrs. C. M. Myers, Elkin; E. L. Davis, Winston-Salem; Don C. 
Voung, Asheville; Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; C M. Scott, High Point; T. W. 
Baker, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1947 — Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem; G. E. Tucker, Winston- 
Salem; W. Grady Southern, Winston-Salem; John R. Knott, Charlotte; E. L. Layfield, 
Raleigh; B. A. Bowers, Ridgecrest. 

Term Expiring 1948 — Amos S. Bumgardner, Charlotte; R. E. Earp, Selma; J. S. Lynch, 
Winston-Salem; James G. Middleton, Wilmington; Mrs. Otis E. Tucker, Winston-Salem. 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
MILLS HOME 

General Managership began January 12, 1885 

First orphan, Mary Presson, received November 11, 1885 

Ike G. Greer, General Superintendent, Thomasville 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer, Thomasville 



Annual of Session 1944 7 

charity and children 

John Arch McMillan, Editor, Thomasville 

C. M. Howell, Plant Superintendent, Thomasville 

Published every Thursday by the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina 

Orphanage Journal of the Baptists of North Carolina 

Founded in 1887 by John H. Mills 

Former Editors 

John H. Mills, July 14, 1887 to July 27, 1888; J. W. Oliver, August 3, 1888 to August 

24, 1888; John H. Mills, August 31, 1888 to August 30, 1895; Vacant, 

September 6, 1895 to October 4, 1895; Archibald Johnson, October 

11, 1895 to January 10, 1935; John Arch McMillan, Associate 

Editor, October 31, 1929 to January 10, 1935. Acting 

Editor January 17, 1935 to May 9, 1935; 

Editor May 16, 1935 — 
Circulation, 28,756 — Price, $1.00 per year 

KENNEDY HOME BRANCH 

Transfer of property, April 26, 1912 

First group admitted, June 5, 1914 

W. C. Reed, Superintendent, Kinston 

Board of Trustees 

Zeno Wall, President, Shelby 

Term Expiring 1945— Charles Shields, Scotland Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; T. H. 
Broyhill, Lenoir; W. M. York, Greensboro; Carroll C. Wall, Lexington. 

Term Expiring 1946 — Carl Hood, Asheville; J. H. Canaday, Kinston; John T. Coley, 
Rocky Mount; H. W. Baucom, Sr., Black Mountain. 

Term Expiring 1947 — Homer Andrews, Burlington; W. T. Love, Jr., Elizabeth City; 
T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. F. A. Bower, Morganton; Mrs. E. B. Gentry, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1948— Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Robert A. 
Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

BIBLICAL RECORDER 

L. L. Carpenter, Editor, Raleigh 
Published every Wednesday in Raleigh, as the Journal of the Baptist State Convention 

of North Carolina 

Founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith in Edenton. Moved to New Bern in 1835, then to 

Raleigh in 1838. Publication suspended in 1841, but resumed in 1843. Originally 

incorporated 1901 and owned by the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company until 

purchased by The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina in 1938. 

On January 4, 1939 the first issue was published by the Convention. 

Former Editors 

Thomas Meredith, 1833-51; T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; J. J. James, 1854-61; J. D. Hufham. 

1861-67; J. H. Mills, 1867-73; A. F. Redd and J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; C. T. 

Bailey, 1875-95; Josiah W. Bailey, 1895-1907; C. W. Blanchard, 1907; Hight 

C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston Johnson, 1917-31; J. S. Farmer, 1931-38; 

George W. Paschal, Contributing Editor, 1938-39; and Acting Editor, 

1939; John Calvin Slemp, 1939-41; Eugene I. Olive. 

1941-42; L. L. Carpenter, 1942 

Circulation, 14,434 — Price, $2.00 a year 

Board of Directors 

Carl M. Townsend, Chairman, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1945 — J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; W. Perry Crouch, Asheville; Lee 
C. Sheppard, Raleigh; Eugene Bullard, Wilmington. 

Term Expiring 1946 — E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; J. Glenn Blackburn, Lumberton; Claude 
U. Broach, Charlotte; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex. 

Term Expiring 1947 — Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; Carl M. 
Townsend, Raleigh; Henry B. Anderson, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1948— J. S. Hopkins, High Point; G. Carl Lewis, Wilmington; E. C. 
Tatum, Cooleemee; T. Lacy Williams, Raleigh. 

V. TRUSTEES OF VARIOUS COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened as Buie's Creek Academy, January 5, 1887 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College, August 31, 1926 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 



8 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Board of Trustees 

B. F. McLeod, Chairman, Buie's Creek 
Term Expiring 1945 — S. F. Teague, Raleigh; G. F. Pope, Dunn; Mrs. W. M. Morgan, 
Angier; Mrs. Eugene I. Olive, Wake Forest; H. B. Taylor, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1946 — B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; A. Lincoln Fulk, Washington; 
Jere D. Freeman, Wilmington; Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington; J. E. Lanier, Winton. 

Term Expiring 1947 — George W. Davis, Farmville; Henry B. Day, Sr., Raleigh; R. B. 
Wilkins, Durham; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville; W. C. Downing, Fayetetville. 

Term Expiring 1948 — James I. MiU er > Wilson; D. T. Dickie, Henderson; D. H. 
Senter, Chalybeate Springs; W. H. Upchurch, Oxford; W. C. Lucas, Asheboro. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE* 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 1851 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868 

Became Chowan College, May 17, 1910 

Changed to a Junior College, September 1937 

Board of Trustees 

Merrill Evans, Chairman, Ahoskie 

Term Expiring 1945 — W. D. Boone, Winton; B. T. Ward, Sunbury; John O. Askew, 
Harrellsville; J. Ellott Ward, Sr., Elizabeth City; W. R. Parker, Woodland; Dennis Mor- 
gan, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1946 — W. J. Rountree, Hobbsville; Harry Stephenson, Pendleton; W. T. 
Love, Jr., Elizabeth City; George Gibbs, Murfreesboro; A. E. Bowen, Windsor; Mrs. H. 
C. Newbold, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1947 — John M. Elliott, Edenton; Mrs. P. D. Sewell, Murfreesboro; 
W. A. McGlohon, Murfreesboro; J. Craig Revelle, Murfreesboro; Raynor Woodard, Con- 
way; Harry Fereba, Camden. 

Term Expiring 1948 — George T. L T nderwood, Murfreesboro; Mrs. Sallie Parker, Jack- 
son; D. P. Medlin, South Mills; Merrill Evans, Ahoskie; Charles H. Jenkins, Aulander; 
Lowell K. Powell, Ahoskie. 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857 

Chartered Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 14, 1922 

Hoyt Blackwell, President, Mars Hill 

Board of Trustees 

E. F. Watson, President, Spruce Pine 

Term Expiring 1945 — J. Ben Eller, Greensboro; D. C. Bryson, Sylva; W. Locke Rob 
inson, Mars Hill; C. E. Blackstock, Asheville; W. R. Chambers, Marion; Emory C 
McCall, Lenoir; Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville. 

Term Expiring 1946 — Julian A. Glazener, Brevard; Roy Wall, Mars Hill; A. W. White 
hurst, Marshall; Mrs. C. M. Palmer, Albemarle; Robert O. Huffman, Morganton. 

Term Expiring 1947 — J. R. Owen, Asheville; Mrs. W. E. Logan, West Asheville; J. B 
Grice, West Asheville; W. H. Hipps, Asheville; James B. Keith, Asheville; Horace G 
Hammett, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1948 — Wm. Marvin Scruggs, Charlotte; W. T. Duckworth, Asheville 
Mrs. Bertha Carr, Hickory; E. F. Watson, Spruce Pine; W. H. Wray, Gastonia; Mrs 
Rush Stroup, Shelby. 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina, February 27, 1891 

Opened for Students, September 27, 1899 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women, January 20, 1905 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment, January 24, 1911 

Carlyle Campbell, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 

W. H. Weatherspoon, President, Raleigh 
Term Expiring 1945 — E. J. Britt, Lumberton; William Harrison Williams, Charlotte; 
Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington; R. N. Simms, Raleigh; W. A. Thomas, Statesville; Henry 
Edwards, Shelby. 



Suspended operations since close of 1943 session. 



Annual of Session 1944 9 

Term Expiring 1946 — Mrs. Mabel Claire Hoggard Maddrey, Ahoskie; Mrs. Margaret 
Shields Everett, Greenville; Mrs. Beth Carroll Taylor, Charlotte; J. R. Hunter, Raleigh; 
J. E. Broyhill, Lenoir; Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton. 

Term Expiring 1947 — W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; Mrs. 
Maude Davis Bunn, Raleigh; L. A. Martin, Lexington; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; 
A. J. Smith, Goldsboro; James M. Hayes, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1948 — Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh; Z. M. Caveness, Raleigh; 
C. T. Council, Durham; J. Y. Joyner, La Grange; LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; Mrs. Anna 
Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834 

Chartered as Wake Forest College, December 28, 1838 

Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College 

Officially opened July 1, 1941 

The First Class of Students began work, September 10, 1941 

Thurman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 

John A. Oates, President, Fayetteville 

Term Expiring 1945 — Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; C. R. Hamrick, Shelby; W. J. 
Conrad, Winston-Salem; Claude Gore, Rockingham; E. B. Josey, Wilmington; G. E. 
Lineberry, Raleigh; W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; C. Ray Sharpe, Lexington; C. N. Peeler, 
Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1946 — J. E. Allen, Warrenton; A. Y. Arledge, Raleigh; J. M. Brough- 
ton, Raleigh; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee; T. H. King, Wilmington; W. H. Early, Windsor; 
E. Y. Webb, Shelby; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; D. R. Perry, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1947 — J. B. Wyche, Hallsboro; C. H. Durham, Lumberton; D. E. 
Buckner, Greensboro; G. A. Norwood, Goldsboro; J. Bivens Helms, Morganton; S. Wait 
Brewer, Wake Forest; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville; Clarence H. Poe, Raleigh; 
Percy B. Upchurch, Monroe; Germain Bernard, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1948 — Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro; A. J. Hutchins, Canton; John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; Charles C. Holland, Statesville; R. P. 
Holding, Smithfield; B. M. Watkins, Durham; J. C. Watkins, Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet, W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

VI. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTORS' CONFERENCE 
Officers for 1944 

R. Knolan Benfield, President, Hickory 

Chas. L. Gillespie, Vice-President, Smithfield 

Charles B. Trammell, Secretary, Troy 

VII. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907 

Southern Baptist Convention Summer Assembly Grounds 

Ridgecrest, North Carolina 

GOVERNING BOARD 

Executive Committee Southern Baptist Convention 
Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 

DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in Augusta, Ga. 

The 1942 Convention was held in San Antonio, Texas. 

The 1943 Convention was deferred by Executive Committee in view of war restrictions on 
travel. 

The 1944 Convention was held in Atlanta, Georgia. 
Officers of the Convention: 

President: Pat M. Neff, Waco, Texas. 

First Vice President: Louis D. Newton, Atlanta, Ga. 

Second Vice President: Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Secretaries: Hight C. Moore, Nashville, Tenn.; Joseph Henry Burnett, Hendersonville, 
North Carolina. 



10 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., M. T. Rankin, Executive Secretary. North 
Carolina member: Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 

Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga., J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary-Treasurer. 
North Carolina member: R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy. 

Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary. North 
Carolina member: B. A. Bowers, Ridgecrest. 

Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, T. J. Watts, Executive Secretary. North 
Carolina member: E. Norfleet Gardner, Henderson. 

Institutions of the Convention: 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Ellis A. Fuller, President, Louisville, Ky. 
North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; Ralph 
A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, E. D. Head, President, Seminary Hill, 
Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: A P Stephens, Burlington. 

Baptist Bible Institute, Duke K. McCall, President, New Orleans, La. North Carolina 
member of Board of Trustees: Wilson W. Woodcock, Greensboro. 

American Baptist Theological Seminary, E. P. Alldredge, Chairman, Nashville, Tenn. 
Southern Baptist Hospital, Louis J. Bristow, Secretary, New Orleans, La. North 
Carolina director: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest. 

Commissions of the Convention: 

Education Commission — Chas. D. Johnson, Chairman, Waco, Texas. North Carolina 
member: W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest. 

Social Service Commission — J. B. Weatherspoon, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. North 
Carolina members: I. G. Greer, Thomasville, George D. Heaton, Charlotte. 

Standing Committees of the Convention: 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, Lawson H. Cooke, General Secretary, Memphis, 
Tenn. North Carolina member: C. R. Browning, Jr., Asheville. 

Executive Committee, Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. North 
Carolina members: William Harrison Williams, Charlotte, Perry Crouch, Asheville, 
and C. C. Warren, Charlotte. 

Order of Business next Session, R. Kelly White, Chairman, Tenn. North Carolina 
member: Hight C. Moore, Ridgecrest. 

Special Committees of the Convention to Report in 1945 : 

(North Carolina Member.) 

Baptist History: George W. Paschal, Wake Forest. 

Baptist Papers: L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh. 

Baptist Papers Circulation Campaign: Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh. 

Boards: Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh. 

Calendar of Co-ordinated Denominational Activities: None. 

Centennial Session Program: None. 

Commission on Chaplain's Replacements Following War: L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh. 

Evangelism: Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

Luther Rice Memorial: Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Negro Ministerial Education: None. 

Public Relations: None. 

Radio: Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh. 

Revision of Constitution and By-Laws: J. Ben Eller, Greensboro. 

Statement of Principles : None. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. Head- 
quarters, Birmingham, Alabama. Miss Kathleen Mallory, Executive Secretary. 
North Carolina Vice President, Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh. 

BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

Headquarters: 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

First Session, London, July 10-17, 1905 

Last Session, Atlanta, Georgia, August 1939 

James Henry Rushbrooke, President, 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

W. O. Lewis, General Secretary, 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

Next meeting: Year and place of meeting to be determined. 



CONSTITUTION 

I. NAME AND OBJECT 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina. 

The object of the Convention shall be to promote Missions, Education, 
Social Service, the distribution and study of the Bible and sound religious 
literature ; and to cooperate with the Southern Baptist Convention in its work. 

II. MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be com- 
posed of not more than three representatives from each white association in 
the State and not more than one representative from each cooperating church 
for every fifty members or fraction thereof and of the officers and members 
of the General Board of the Convention and of the Life Members so declared 
under the previous Constitution : Provided, that no church have more than ten 
representatives and no one shall be a member of the Convention who is not a 
member in good standing of a Missionary Baptist Church cooperating with the 
Convention. 

III. MEETINGS 

Section 1. The Convention shall meet annually on Tuesday after the third 
Sunday in November, except in those years when the meeting date will fall 
in Thanksgiving week ; in which case the Convention shall meet annually on 
Tuesday after the second Sunday in November. 

IV. OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers of the Convention shall be a President, a First 
Vice President, a Second Vice President, a Third Vice President, a Recording 
Secretary, a General Secretary, a Treasurer (the General Secretary may be 
elected as Treasurer at the discretion of the Convention), three Trustees of 
the Convention, and five Directors of the North Carolina Baptist Foundation. 
The President, Vice Presidents, Recording Secretary, General Secretary, and 
Treasurer shall be elected as the Convention may determine, the Trustees of the 
Convention and Directors of the Baptist Foundation in the manner provided 
by their respective charters. The terms of office of President and Vice Presi- 
dents commence at the conclusion of the session at which they are elected and 
continue until the close of the next Convention. 

Sec. 2. The President shall preside over the deliberations of the Convention 
and discharge such other duties as are imposed upon him by the Convention or 
as are incumbent on the presiding officer of a deliberative body. He shall in 
advance of the meeting of the Convention appoint a committee on Enrollment 
consisting of nine members, and a Committee on Committees consisting of 
fifteen members. He may appoint other committees when so directed by the 
body. In case of his absence or incapacity the Vice Presidents shall act in 
his stead. In case of his death the Vice Presidents shall succeed to the office 
in the order of their rank. 



12 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve the proceedings 
of the Convention and have the same printed and distributed. 

Sec. 4. The General Secretary of the Convention shall have administrative 
supervision of the work of Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other 
general training activities of the Convention. He shall work under the direc- 
tion and be subject to the authority of the General Board. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent to him for the objects 
of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once a month in the 
Biblical Recorder or the then recognized denominational organ, give a bond to 
the Trustees of the Convention in such amount as they may determine for the 
faithful performance of his duties and prescribe the terms and conditions of 
said bond. The Treasurer shall sign all checks, which shall be countersigned 
by the General Secretary, or in case the office of Secretary and the office of 
Treasurer shall be filled by one man, then checks shall be countersigned by 
the bonded bookkeeper, or any other bonded officer or employee at the dis- 
cretion of the Board, which shall indicate its decision and will by filing formal 
resolutions with the depository bank. 

He shall also forward at least once a month all contributions to their 
destination ; at every meeting of the Convention he shall make a full report of 
his receipts and disbursements, and upon retiring from his office, deliver to his 
successor all moneys, papers, books and other property belonging thereto. 

Sec. 6. The Trustees shall take and hold the title to any and all property 
acquired by and belonging to the Convention. They shall require a sufficient 
bond from the Treasurer. In case he shall refuse or neglect to give satisfactory 
bond within thirty days after his election the Trustees shall have power to elect 
a successor. The said Trustees shall elect a chairman and secretary and report 
annually to the Convention the work done by them. They shall receive and 
make such conveyances of the properties of the Convention as directed by the 
Convention. During the interim between sessions of the Convention the said 
Trustees may receive and convey the property of the Convention upon the 
advice and direction of the General Board. 

V. DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Enrollment to provide 
registration cards for messengers, and have them in a suitable place several 
hours before the time set for the opening session of the Convention. This 
committee shall make a report to the assembled messengers upon the call of 
the President. 

Sec. 2. The Committees of the Convention shall be grouped into two 
categories : 

(A) Those appointed to serve during the session of the Convention by 
which they are appointed, and . 

(B) Those appointed to report at a subsequent meeting of the Convention; 
and both (A) and (B) shall be named by the Committee on Committees. Those 
in group (A) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee to Report on General Board's Report. 

(2) Committee on Place and Preacher for the next Convention. 

(3) Committee on Resolutions. 



Annual of Session 1944 13 

Those in group (B) shall be designated as follows: 

(1) Committee on Order of Business for the subsequent Convention. 

(2) Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its Institutions 
and Members of the General Board. 

(3) Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. 

(4) The Historical Commission. 

(5) Committee on Publicity. 

Sec. 3. The Committee on Committees shall report to the Convention as 
soon after the organization of the Convention as may be practicable. 

VI. GENERAL BOARD 

Section 1. The General Board of the Convention shall consist of the 
President and Recording Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, and forty- 
eight members from the State at large. The Convention shall elect one-third 
of the members from the State at large to hold office for one year, one-third 
for two years, and one-third for three years, but as the terms expire the 
successors shall serve for terms of three years. That retiring members of the 
Board be ineligible for reelection until the following meeting of the State 
Convention. No one in the employment for pay of any Institution or Board 
fostered by this Convention shall be eligible to membership on this Board, 
except as an ex officio member. The General Board shall fill all vacancies in 
its membership between the session of the Convention until the session of the 
next Convention, when the vacancies shall be filled by the Convention itself in 
the manner provided by its laws. 

Sec. 2. The General Board shall have charge and control, except when 
otherwis2 directed by the Convention, of all work of the Convention, including 
Missions, Education, Benevolences, ' and all other general activities, in the 
interim between the sessions of the Convention. Any action by the General 
Board during the interim between the sessions of the Convention vitally related 
to the work of the Convention shall be binding upon the Convention. Provided: 
the Board shall not act upon any matter previously committed to some other 
agency of the Convention ; and provided that the Board shall not launch any 
new institution or enterprise until the Convention shall have considered and 
approved such action; and that all actions of the Board during the interim of 
the session shall be reported fully to the Convention at its next session. 

Provided, further that the limitation of the powers of the General Board 
herein provided shall not at any time be interpreted as prohibiting any ex- 
pansion in any phase of work already established which the Board may consider 
expedient, and which its income and resources may make possible. 

Sec. 3. The General Board or the Executive Committee shall employ a 
certified public accountant each year to make a complete audit of the books 
and accounts of the treasurer and bookkeeping department and report to the 
General Board, which shall receive said report and bring it in printed form 
to the Convention for the Convention's consideration and action, and after 
action by the Convention shall have it published in the Minutes of the Con- 
vention and in the Biblical Recorder, or the then recognized denominational 
organ. 

Sec. 4. The General Board shall report to each session of the Convention 
upon the work done in each department, viz. : Missions, Education, Benevo- 



14 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

lences and all other general activities. The Board shall have its report printed 
and ready for distribution at the first session of the Convention; all reports 
from Educational Institutions, Hospitals, Orphanages, Baptist Foundation, and 
all other institutions or agencies of the Convention shall report to the Conven- 
tion through the General Board. 

Sec. 5. The General Board of the Convention shall meet in regular session 
in January and June of each year, and in cases of emergency at the call of the 
President and General Secretary of the Board or any five members. 

Sec. 6. At the annual January meeting of the General Board, there shall 
be elected the following officers who shall serve for one year, and until their 
successors are elected and qualified : President, Vice President and Recording 
Secretary. 

At the same time the Board shall elect all Departmental Heads and such 
other assistants as may from time to time be deemed necessary, and shall fix 
compensation of its Secretaries and other employees, and all salaried officers 
of the Convention; prozided that at any other meeting of the General Board, 
or at any meeting of the Executive Committee, such other departmental heads 
or assistants may be elected as may be deemed necessary, and, in case of election 
by the Committee, the Committee shall have power to fix compensations up to 
the next meeting of the General Board. 

Sec. 7. At the January meeting of the General Board the work of the 
Convention shall be divided as follows : Missions, Education, Benevolences and 
Training Activities. The membership of the General Board shall be divided 
into four committees of twelve each and the work as above outlined shall be 
assigned to these committees. Each committee shall organize itself by the 
selection of a chairman and a recording secretary. All appropriations for the 
work of the various departments of the General Board shall be made by the 
General Board ; but each committee shall make to the General Board definite 
and specific recommendations as to all appropriations. 

Sec. 8. The General Board shall elect an Executive Committee consisting 
of the Chairman of the Board, ex officio, and six other members of the Board 
at large, the members being chosen because of their recognized fitness and 
ability to render the services to be expected of them, and with some reference 
to their proximity to Raleigh, the headquarters of the Board; and that the 
President of the Convention shall be ex officio member of the Executive Com- 
mittee. The Executive Committee shall meet at the call of the General Sec- 
retary and shall have general direction and oversight of all the work of the 
General Board in the interim between the sessions of the Board and such other 
matters as shall be assigned to it by the General Board. 

Sec. 9. The General Board shall be successor in law to all legal obliga- 
tions heretofore incurred by the Board of Missions and by the Board of 
Education. 

Sec. 10. At each January meeting the General Board may select such other 
departmental assistants as may be needed. 

- VII. TRUSTEES OF CONVENTION'S INSTITUTIONS 

Section 1. The charters of all institutions owned and supported by the 
Convention shall contain the following provisions as nearly as may be and 
conformable to the number of trustees to be elected, that is to say; 



Annual of Session 1944 15 

*a. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect the Trustees 
)f said corporation and their regular term of office shall be four years. At the 
first election by the Convention one-fourth of the board of trustees shall be 
elected to serve for one year, one-fourth for two years, one-fourth for three 
years, and the remaining one-fourth for four years. At each subsequent reg- 
ular annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina one- 
fourth of the members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be 
elected by the Convention to succeed the members of said Board retiring, the 
retiring members being ineligible for reelection until one year has elapsed. 

b. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be 
residents of the State of North Carolina and members in good and regular 
standing of a Missionary Baptist Church cooperating with the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina. 

c. Removal from the State or ceasing for any reason to be a member in 
good and regular standing of a Missionary Baptist Church cooperating with 
the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be equivalent to a 
resignation from said Board of Trustees. Any vacancy on the Board shall be 
filled by the remaining members until the next regular annual session of the 
Convention and the Convention shall at its next regular annual session fill the 
vacancy for the unexpired term. 

d. The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, become dis- 
qualified, or been removed shall not expire until his successor shall have been 
duly elected and qualified. 

e. The Board of Trustees of said corporation by the affirmative vote of 
three-fourths of its entire membership given in regular annual meeting or in 
a special meeting duly called for the purpose, shall have power to remove from 
office any trustee of such corporation for cause considered sufficient by such 
Board, but only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity to him 
to be heard by the Board. 

f. The Baptist State Convention shall have the right at any time to remove 
from office any trustee for cause considered sufficient by the Convention, but 
only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity for him to be 
heard by the Convention. Notice of such contemplated action and hearing by 
the Convention may be given by the Executive Committee of the Convention. 

g. That no individual shall serve on any Board, or Institution, who is at 
the same time holding membership on any other Board or Institution. 

Sec. 2. The Trustees of all institutions, benevolent, educational, or other- 
wise under the control of the Convention shall be elected by the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina and shall hold office for the term to which 
elected, unless sooner terminated. When any vacancy shall occur in any Board 
of any institution a nominating committee elected by the Convention shall 
nominate to the Convention Baptists to fill such vacancy. The Trustees of all 
institutions owned and supported by the Convention shall make annual report 
to the nominating committee of any vacancies. Each Board shall have the right 
to make any suggestion to the nominating committee it may see fit regarding 
such nominations, and all nominations made by the committee shall be passed 
upon by the Convention. The Convention shall have the right to adopt the 



* Amendment adopted 1944 Convention. See Sec. 73 page 48. 



16 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

report of the nominating committee and elect the trustees thus nominated, or 
to substitute the name of other trustee or trustees in lieu thereof, or recommit 
said report for further consideration as the case may be. 

VIII. GENERAL ITEMS 

Section 1. Individuals, churches, and associations, or others desiring the 
assistance and cooperation of the Baptists of the State in any work not already 
fostered by the Convention should present the question to the agency under 
which is should be properly placed. If the agency should refuse to take it up, 
it may be presented to the Convention under miscellaneous business or a special 
order. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Boards of the Convention and Institutions 
affiliated with the Convention shall be distributed as widely as practicable, both 
as to territory and individuals. 

Sec. 3. The Convention year shall close December 31 of each year. 

Sec. 4. No institution or agency affiliating with the Convention shall en- 
cumber its property or change its status with respect to the Convention without 
authority of the Convention or its General Board. 

That except as may be necessary in the reasonable anticipation of current 
revenues and payable out of the same, or for the purpose of funding or 
refinancing any indebtedness of the Convention now outstanding, neither the 
Convention or its General Board shall have the power to create any debt or 
obligation binding on the Convention ; and no other board, agency or institu- 
tion of, or affiliated with the Convention, shall have the power at any time to 
create any debt or obligation binding on the Convention. 

Sec. 5. If for any reason, it shall be necessary to select a place or to 
change the time or place of the meeting of the Convention after the Convention 
adjourns, the President, Recording Secretary and the General Secretary of the 
Convention shall be a committee with power to make necessary change or 
changes. 

Sec. 6. Any and all resolutions presented to the Convention shall be 
referred to the Committee on Resolutions, except that by a two-thirds vote of 
the messengers then present the rules may be suspended and a resolution placed 
upon its immediate consideration. 

Sec. 7. This constitution may be changed or amended on any day of any 
annual session of the Convention by two-thirds vote of the members present 
when the vote is taken, provided notice of the contemplated amendment or 
change shall 'have been announced on a previous day of the Convention. 

RULES FOR OPERATION OF THE GENERAL BOARD 
I. THE PRESIDENT AND RECORDING SECRETARY 

The President of the General Board, in addition to the regular duties in- 
cumbent upon such officers, shall appoint special committees to investigate and 
report upon any matters which concern equally all departments of the work 
of the' Convention. The Secretary shall record all proceedings in correct form 
and preserve the same. 



Annual of Session 1944 17 

II. QUORUM 

Seventeen members shall be required to constitute a quorum of the Board. 
Five shall be required to constitute a quorum of any department. Four shall 
constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee of the General Board. 

III. THE WORK OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

The work of the General Board shall be apportioned among its four divi- 
sions, in so far as may be practicable, as indicated below. The General Board, 
the Executive Committee of the General Board and the General Secretary (48 
members exclusive of the President and Secretary of the Convention, who are 
ex officio members) : 

1. Committee on Missions — (12) — Division of (1) Field Work; (2) Evan- 
gelism; (3) Negro Work. 

2. Committee on Training Activities — (12) — Division of (1) Sunday schools 
— Secretary; (2) B.Y.P.U. — Secretary; (3) Student Activities. 

3. Committee on Benevolences — (12) — Division of (1) Orphanage; (2) 
Hospital; (3) Ministers' Relief. 

4. Committee on Education — (12) — Division of (1) Educational Institu- 
tion; (2) Ministerial Education. 

5. Department of Woman's Missionary Union. 

The Executive Committee shall have power in its discretion, to modify, 
enlarge, diminish, or otherwise alter the divisions of the work of the Board 
as it may from time to time deem advisable or necessary, the changes so made 
to be reported to the next regular meeting of the General Board for its 
consideration. 

IV. UNDESIGNATED GIFTS 

The General Board at its annual meeting shall determine the percentage 
of undesignated gifts that each object of the Convention shall receive, includ- 
ing State and South-wide, provided always that any allocation of such funds 
shall not violate any order with respect to the same previously made by the 
Baptist Convention. 

V. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee shall have power to borrow money and execute 
notes on behalf of the General Board for the purpose of meeting the obligations 
of said Board, and to do and perform any act incidental or necessary in the 
execution and discharge of the work of the General Board : Provided, the 
Executive Committee shall not incur obligations for any object in excess of the 
budget fixed by the General Board. Notes may be executed in the name 
of the General Board and on its behalf by the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee attested by the General Secretary, and when so executed by authority 
of the Executive Committee duly given, shall be the binding obligation of the 
General Board. 

The Executive Committee of the General Board shall meet upon the call 
of the General Secretary, or any four members. If practicable, at least one 
meeting shall be held each month. 



18 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VI. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION 

His duties, together with all other Departmental Heads, or Assistants, shall 
be determined from time to time by the General Board. 

VII. EXECUTIVE SESSION 

The General Board may by a majority vote of the number present, go into 
executive session at any time for the purpose of considering such matters as 
may claim the consideration of said Board. 

VIII. AMENDMENTS 

These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting by a majority vote 
of the members attending said meeting. 

IX. PUBLICATION 

These by-laws, together with any amendments that may be made thereon, 
from time to time, shall be printed in the Minutes of the Baptist State 
Convention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



PROCEEDINGS 

TUESDAY MORNING, November 16, 1944 

1. Promptly at 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in the First Baptist Church, Charlotte, 
Ralph A. Herring, President, called the One Hundred Fourteenth Annual Ses- 
sion of the North Carolina Baptist State Convention to order and requested 
H. Grady Miller, Winston-Salem, Director of Music for the Convention, to 
lead the assembled delegates in the singing of "Come Thou Fount." Miss Mary 
Currin, Raleigh, accompanied at the piano. 

2. A. D. Kinnett, Burlington, offered the opening prayer after the singing 
of "O, For a Thousand Tongues." 

3. The official enrollment of the delegates being the next order of business, 
the President released the following names to compose the Committee on En- 
rollment : A. B. Wood, Chairman, J. C. Yates, Mrs. B. Carroll Taylor, John 
R. Knott, Mrs. R. K. Redwine, L. M. Dixon, E. S. Summers, W. W. Lawton, 
and Mrs. A. S. Bumgardner. 

4. In announcing the present registration at 698, the motion of Chairman 
Wood of the Committee carried, that the present enrolled messengers and all 
other messengers who arrive during the remaining sessions and upon their 
registration, constitute the Convention for the transaction of the Order of 
Business. 

5. The organization of the Convention was perfected in the election of the 
following officers upon the motion of W. B. Carr, Mooresville : 

General Secretary and Treasurer M. A. Huggins, Raleigh 

Recording Secretary C. B. Deane, Rockingham 

Statistical Secretary L. L. Morgan, Raleigh 

6. President Herring announced the following names to compose the Com- 
mittee on Committees: R. K. Redwine, J. B. Turner, Miss Mabel Starnes, Mrs. 
Norfleet Gardner, J. P. Davis, Earl Robinson, Tom Lawrence, C. N. Royall, 
J. R. Morgan, Horace Easom, J. B. Grice, Miss Ila Hensley, J. B. Efird, H. 
W. Baucom, Jr., and Mrs. Gordon Maddrey. 

7. The Committee on Order of Business, consisting of B. E. Morris, W. F. 
West, C. E. Baucom, A. C. Reid, A. P. Stephens, Eph Whisenhunt, A. B. 
Wood, Mrs. Carl M. Townsend and Miss Wynona Chaney, released the Order 
of Business for the Convention and upon the motion of B. E. Morris, Chair- 
man, it was approved. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

General Theme : The Mission of the Church in the World Today 

Tuesday Morning, November 14, 1944 

(opening session) 
10 :00 Praise and Prayer 
10:10 Enrollment and Organization 

10:20 Report of Committee on Order of Business B. E. Morris, Durham 

Appointment of Committees 



22 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

10:35 Presentation of Charlotte Pastors, New Pastors, and Visitors 

10 :50 Presentation of Reports E. N. Gardner, Henderson 

11:50 Miscellaneous and Music 

12 :00 Convention Sermon Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington 

Alternate R. Knolan Benfield, Hickory 

Tuesday Afternoon 

(christian literature session) 
2 :30 Praise and Prayer 

2:35 Relief and Annuity Board E. N. Gardner, Henderson, Presiding 

3 :00 Scripture, Prayer and Music J. B. Turner, Laurinburg 

3 :10 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh 

3 :45 Sunday School Board B. A. Bowers, Ridgecrest, Presiding 

(1) Report 

(2) Address John L. Hill, Nashville, Tenn. 

Tuesday Evening 

(foreign mission session) 

7 :30 Praise and Prayer 

7 :40 American Bible Society 

7:55 Truett Memorial 

00 Biblical Recorder E. I. Olive, Wake Forest 

30 Scripture, Prayer and Music Donald G. Myers, Wadesboro 

40 Foreign Missions Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, Presiding 

(1) Report and Presentation of Missionaries 

(2) Address 

Wednesday Morning, November 15 

(state mission session) 
9 :30 Praise and Prayer 
9 :40 Reports of Committees 

9:50 Orphanage Zeno Wall, Shelby 

10 :20 State Missions Secretary M. A. Huggins, Raleigh 

11 :20 Scripture, Prayer and Music J. Samuel Johnson, Durham 

11 :30 Cooperative Program Carey P. Herring, Fairmont 

12:00 "The Imperative Call for Militant Evangelism" 

Casper C. Warren, Charlotte 

Wednesday Afternoon 

(christian education session) 
2 :30 Praise and Prayer 
2:40 Reports of Committees 
2 :45 Reports of Seminaries 
3 :00 "The Training of Ministers and Church Workers" 

Fred C. Schatz, New Orleans, La. 
3 :30 Report of Committee on Constitutional Changes 

Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte 
3 :40 Reports of the Colleges and the Education Council 

Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh 



Annual of Session 1944 23 

Wednesday Evening 

(social, civic and world service session) 
7 :30 Praise and Prayer 

7 :40 Report of Historical Commission 
7 :45 Report of Trustees of Convention 
7:50 Reports of Committees 

(1) Committee to Nominate Members of General Board, Institutions, 
and Agencies of Convention 

(2) Publicity 

(3) Place and Preacher 

(4) Report on General Board's Report 

(5) Radio and Music 

8 :00 "The Men in Our Churches" 

( 1 ) Report C. R. Browning, Jr., Asheville 

(2) Address L. A. Martin, Lexington 

8:30 Report of Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness 

A. D. Kinnett, Burlington 
8 :45 Address Robert L. Humber, Greenville 

Thursday Morning, November 16 

(closing session) 

9 :30 Praise and Prayer 

9:40 Reports of Committees, Resolutions and Miscellaneous 
9 :45 Reading of the Journal 

9 :50 Baptist Hospital J. S. Lynch, Winston-Salem 

10 :20 Scripture, Prayer and Music J. Louis Price, Hickory 

10 :30 Baptist Foundation T. S. Johnson, Raleigh 

10:45 Election of Officers 

11 :00 Home Missions R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy, Presiding 

(1) Report 

(2) "City Missions in the Centennial Crusade" 

S. F. Dowis, Atlanta, Ga. 
11 :30 "Evangelism as Preparation for a Post-War World" 

M. E. Dodd, Shreveport, La. 
Adjourn 

8. Casper C. Warren, Pastor of the Host Church, was recognized, and 
brought greetings in behalf of the Convention Church and the other Baptist 
churches of the city. He was followed by Willis G. Clark, rector of St. 
Peter's Episcopal Church, Charlotte, who extended greetings on behalf of the 
Mecklenburg Ministerial Association. 

9. The President spoke words of welcome to all visitors present and to 
others who may visit any of the Convention's sessions (see page 64). Upon his 
request, the following past presidents of the Convention arose and were recog- 
nized : C. H. Durham, Lumberton ; J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro ; Zeno Wall, 
Shelby ; I. G. Greer, Thomasville ; R. N. Simms, Raleigh ; and Wm. Harrison 
Williams, Charlotte. President Herring called attention to the presence of 
the following-named Royal Ambassadors, who because of their excellence in 
R.A. work, had been selected by the Woman's Missionary Union to act as 



24 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Convention pages : Dwight Wilhelm, Albermale ; Edward Elliott, Cherryville ; 
Milton Snyder, Hickory ; Bobby Hanes, Charlotte ; and Carson Perry, Sher- 
wood. 

10. Attention was directed to the presence at this opening session of L. R. 
Pruette, Charlotte, who for these many years has been an active servant of 
the Convention. 

11. All the Baptist ministers of Charlotte and the Mecklenburg Association 
were asked to come forward and be recognized by the Convention. 

12. All new pastors coming into the State during the year were invited to 
the front and were presented by General Secretary Huggins and welcomed by 
President Herring, viz. : 

New Pastors Recognized 
Jack T. Akin, Monroe ; V. Ward Barr, Gastonia ; Claude U. Broach, 
Charlotte; W. Herbert Brown, Bryson City; David E. Browning, North 
Wilkesboro; J. V. Case, Rose Hill; B. A. Davis, Kannapolis; L. G. 
Elliott, Waynesville ; Bertis Fair, Newton; Fletcher Ford, Severn; Hen- 
derson S. Fox, Charlotte ; R. M. Hagler, Caroleen ; Richard E. Hard- 
away, Greenville ; J. C. R. Hendon, Mooresville ; W. F. Hinesley, 
Gastonia ; L. D. Holt, Bethel ; John Wesley Lambert, Mount Olive ; 
Sanford L. Lamm, Avondale ; O. D. Moore, Cliffside; R. E. Moore, Rural 
Hall; M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs; R. E. 
Rice, Burlington ; Henry C. Rogers, Lincolnton ; W. C. Sledge, Lowell ; 
C. S. Smith, White Oak; C. C. Warren, Charlotte; C. M. Warren, 
Sylva ; W. Gordon Wilson, Marion; L. M. Woolweaver, Rocky Mount. 

13. The Advance Report of the General Board (see Section 85, page 69) 
was the next order presided over by Board President E. Norfleet Gardner, 
Henderson, and after his introductory remarks, he called upon M. A. Huggins, 
General Secretary, to take charge of the presentation. This he did, calling 
especial attention to the year 1945 and the desired goals. The Convention 
viewed with thankful hearts the splendid accomplishments of the churches and 
their splendid support of Convention objects, but the need of a greater spiritual 
awakening was emphasized. 

At the close of the General Secretary's remarks the report itself and the 
recommendations appearing at the end of the report were referred to the Com- 
mittee to Report on the General Board's Report. 

14. Of special significance at this period was the burning by the General 
Secretary, assisted by J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro, of the last paid notes 
totaling $825,000.00 of the old Convention indebtedness. The General Sec- 
retary pointed out that in 1923 when Pastor Turner was the Convention's 
President and at which time the Convention elected him, this indebtedness 
totaled $1,000,000.00 and that it was the hope of the Convention to pay up these 
notes now being burned by 1945, but in view of increased gifts by the churches 
this happy experience could be enjoyed by the Convention now. 

15. Chairman Wood of the Enrollment Committee announced that the total 
registration had reached 951, of which 859 were delegates and 92 visitors. 

16. The President expressed a desire that the Convention Sermon, soon to 
follow, should close this first session, and it was so ordered upon motion by 
Nane Starnes, Asheville. 



Annual of Session 1944 25 

17. After the congregational singing of "Revive Us Again," Jack Aiken, 
Monroe, sang a solo. 

18. Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington, preached the Convention Sermon, using 
as his subject "Saltiness," from the text Matthew 5:13. The scriptural mes- 
sage which included the text was read prior to the sermon by R. K. Benfield, 
Hickory. 

TUESDAY— Afternoon Session 

19. This session centered around Christian Literature and was opened with 
the singing of "We're Marching to Zion." L. R. Pruette, Charlotte, prayed. 

20. E. N. Gardner, Henderson, State representative of the Relief and 
Annuity Board, presided during the discussion of the Board's Report (see Sec- 
tion 112, page 121). The Executive Secretary, Thomas J. Watts, Dallas, Texas, 
brought the special message. 

21. President Herring recognized Navy Chaplain Percy Upchurch, formerly 
of Monroe, who in turn outlined the urgent need for more Baptist Navy 
Chaplains. 

Song: "My Jesus, I Love Thee." 

22. The special scripture and prayer service was offered by James B. Turner, 
Laurinburg. 

23. Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh, President of the State Woman's Missionary 
Union, presided during the consideration of the W.M.U. Report. She urged 
a careful reading of the report which follows and it was adopted upon her 
motion, following the special address by John A. Mackay, President of Prince- 
ton Seminary. His subject centered around the Challenge of Latin America 
to Evangelical Religion. 

REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Your Auxiliary, the Woman's Missionary Union, is happy to bring 
you a report of another year of joyful service as "Laborers Together 
with God." 

Financially 1943 was the best year we have ever had. Miss Ora 
Alford, treasurer, reports the grand total of $470,769.42. During the 
first three quarters of 1944 we have brought tithes and offerings amount- 
ing to $360,995.17. There has been a gratifying increase in the number of 
tithers reported and in the number of churches reporting a gift to missions 
from every resident woman member. Mrs. Chas. E. Stephenson resigned 
as Stewardship Chairman after three years of very efficient service ; Mrs. 
M. A. Huggins was elected to this important office for which she had 
already proved her fitness in Associational and Divisional service. 

Mission Study, under the direction of Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, has 
aroused unusual enthusiasm in these days of world-wide vision and in- 
terest. Mrs. G. K. Middleton has continued to emphasize the study of 
God's Word as the best preparation for Community Missions. 

The Training School, with Mrs. R. K. Redwine as our State Trustee, 
holds a large place in the hearts of our union, and we have a large group 
of choice young women studying there. Miss Daphne Penny, of the 
Tabernacle Church in Raleigh, was awarded the Edna R. Harris Scholar- 
ship for this year. 



26 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The Margaret Fund Chairman, Mrs. L. R. Harrill, reports sons and 
daughters of missionaries, home and foreign, studying in Mars Hill, Mer- 
edith, and Wake Forest Colleges. These children in addition to a $250 
scholarship are given $30 a year for extras, and are cheered by letters 
from our chairman. She also keeps in touch with their parents. 

Mrs. Z. M. Caviness reports substantial gifts of linen and money for 
the Baptist Hospital from many associations. Interest in White Cross 
work is increasing. 

Mrs. L. E. M. Freeman is leading in a very constructive way in Inter- 
racial work. The three Interracial Institutes held during the summer of 
1944 were excellent. There are unanimous requests that these Institutes 
be continued, the colored friends pledging financial help to make them 
possible. 

Miss Kathryn Abee, Young People's Secretary, and Mr. A. T. 
Greene, Jr., who divides his time between our state and South Carolina 
as Royal Ambassador Secretary, have led our young people in splendid 
fashion. The summer camps and House Parties have grown to such pro- 
portions that finding camping places presents a real problem. The South- 
wide meetings at Ridgecrest were largely attended by our North Carolina 
young folk. 

Miss Ruth Keller, chosen as Field Worker since our last report to you, 
is doing a magnificent work. So far she has been mostly in the Western 
part of the state. North Carolina is a big state for only one field worker 
to cover. 

Miss Mary Currin, Executive Secretary, arranged a schedule of Divi- 
sional and Associational Meetings so that they were held in succession in 
time and place, thus saving expense, time, travel, and strength. She 
worked with the superintendents in arranging unusually good programs. 
Despite difficulties of travel, the Associational and Divisional Meetings, 
the Council Meeting and the annual meeting in Charlotte were eminently 
satisfactory. 

We are indebted to many out-of-the-state speakers who have helped 
us in various meetings during the year. Dr. H. H. MacMillan, Mr. Jacob 
Gartenhaus, Miss Sophie Lanneau, Dr. and Mrs. D. F. Stamps, Dr. O. T. 
Binkley, Miss Rose Marlowe, Mrs. Rosalee Mills Appleby, Miss Pearle 
Johnson, Miss Martha Franks, Miss Inabelle Coleman, Miss Juliette 
Mather, Miss Kathleen Mallory. 

As we face the centennial year we pledge to you our best endeavor in 
meeting our share of the high goals being set. We feel as did a Home 
Missionary concluding his report to the Board long ago, "Seeing how the 
Lord hath prospered us it becomes us to prudently and prayerfully press 
forward." The watchwords for 1945 present to us a high goal and com- 
pelling purpose : t 

"For we are laborers together with God" "having the everlasting 
gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth and to every nation 
and kindred and tongue and people." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer. 



Annual of Session 1944 27 

Song : "O Zion Haste." 

24. During the discussion of the Sunday School Board, B. A. Bowers, 
Ridgecrest, the Board's N. C. State member, presided, and upon his motion, 
the report which follows was adopted after a special address by John L. Hill, 
Nashville, who used as his theme "The Place of Baptist Literature in a Post- 
War Mission Program." 

REPORT SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD 

The Sunday School Board has done its best during these trying years 
of war; the literature has been kept at a high standard, at the same time 
the Board has met all government requirements and thus they are doing 
their part to bring to a successful conclusion this terrible conflict. 

The Sunday School Board has large plans for our Centennial Crusade. 
On March 6, 1945, there will be simultaneous meetings in every Asso- 
ciation in the South. They are asking Southern Baptists to organize 
10,000 new Sunday Schools, to conduct 10,000 Vacation Bible Schools, 
and to have 10,000 or more study courses. Through this enlarged pro- 
gram we will be able to win thousands to Christ. 

September 10-14, 1945, is set apart for Better Bible Teachers Clinics. 
These will be arranged to suit various communities. 

It is the plan of the Board to make all of their publications Biblical 
and of the highest service to our churches. The 1945 program for Ridge- 
crest is already in the making and gives promise of being the best we 
have had. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bartlett A. Bowers. 

25. At this hour and at other times during the session R. K. Redwine, 
Hickory, as Chairman of the Committee on Committees, released the following 
Committees : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 
Committees to Report During 1944 Convention 

Committee to Report on the Report of the General Board: 

Tom P. Pruitt, Hickory, Chairman; H. G. Anderson, Durham; Guy S. 
Cain, Graham; Lee C. Sheppard, Raleigh; J. M. Hayes, Winston- Salem ; 
G. C. Cox, Asheville ; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex ; R. R. Jackson, High 
Point; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; Mrs. E. B. Gentry, Charlotte; Mrs. 
Rush Stroupe, Shelby ; Phil L. Elliott, Boiling Springs ; Zeb A. Caudle, 
Lenoir ; Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

Eugene Olive, Wake Forest, Chairman; M. O. Alexander, Beaufort ; Das 
Kelly Barnett, Chapel Hill ; W. Wilbur Hutchins, High Point ; R. E. Brick- 
house, Warrenton; Mrs. J. Gray Murray, Cary; Miss Kathryn Bates, Char- 
lotte; Mrs. R. T. Howerton, Jr., Raleigh; J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro. 

Place and Preacher: 

Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, Chairman; Edwin F. Perry, Rockingham ; R. A. 
Ellis, Salisbury; J. C. Canipe, Boone; Avery M. Church, Winston-Salem; 



28 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Fon H. Scofield, Wake Forest; J. Marshall Walker, Stovall ; A. J. Smith, 
Goldsboro ; J. E. Kirk, Lewisville. 

Committees to Report During 1945 Convention 

Publicity: 

L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, Chairman; C. Sylvester Green, Durham; Miss 
Martha Ann Allen, Garner ; C. R. Austin, Charlotte ; Santford Martin, 
Winston-Salem; R. E. Price, Rutherfordton ; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; 
J. A. McMillan, Thomasville ; C. B. Deane, Rockingham. 

Music: 

Horace B. Easom, Shelby, Chairman; A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek ; L. C. 
Pinnix, Kings Mountain ; H. Grady Miller, Winston-Salem ; C. S. Hodge, 
Greensboro ; Miss Mildred Thomas, Durham ; Mrs. Alice Berman, Charlotte. 

Historical Commission: 

G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest, Chairman; J. W. Whitley, Albemarle; Mrs. 
E. T. Crittenden, Wake Forest ; Thad F. Deitz, Sylva ; L. R. Pruitt, Char- 
lotte ; B. W. Spilman, Kinston ; L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh ; Miss Flossie 
Martin, Winston-Salem ; Willis G. Briggs, Raleigh ; Mrs. J. A. Yarbrough, 
Charlotte, Dr. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

Committee on Order of Business: 

Casper C. Warren, Charlotte, Chairman; Owen F. Herring, Durham; C. L. 
Gillespie, Smithfield ; John McGinnis, Reidsville; M. H. Kendall, Mars 
Hill; G. Carl. Lewis, Wilmington; Jack A. Neilson, Thomasville; Mrs. W. 
W. Jones, Kannapolis ; Mrs. Loula Mae Teague, Burlington. 

Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its Institutions and 

Members of the General Board: 

J. Winston Pearce, Durham, Chairman; H. W. Baucom, Sr., Black Moun- 
tain ; Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford ; Walter L. Warfford, Carthage ; 
Yancey C. Elliott, Sanford; W. W. Finlator, Weldon ; F. Orion Mixon, 
Raleigh; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; George J. Griffin, Zebulon; James W. 
Ray, Spindale ; Tom E. Walters, Ridgecrest ; Mrs. Hubert Craig, Lincoln- 
ton ; Miss Mary Humphrey, Asheville; Mrs. O. R. Mangum, Lenoir. 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness: 

George D. Heaton, Charlotte, Chairman; I. G. Greer, Thomasville; E. Nor- 
fleet Gardner, Henderson ; Donald G. Myers, Wadesboro ; L. A. Martin, 
Lexington; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; C. E. Otey, Mount Airy; Carl 
L. Ousley, Siler City; Clyde W. Glosson, Kernersville ; O. M. Seigler, 
Hendersonville ; Miss Mary Currin, Raleigh ; J. Ben Eller, Greensboro ; 
J. A. Easley, Wake Forest; Mrs. Perry Crouch, Asheville ; Miss Madge 
Lewis, Waynesville. 

Radio: 

Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh, Chairman; Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh; Mrs. 
Glenn Lassiter, Raleigh ; W. Perry Crouch, Asheville ; George D. Heaton, 
Charlotte ; L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh ; C. E. Parker, Winston-Salem ; Wilson 
Woodcock, Greensboro. 



Annual of Session 1944 29 

Members at Large for Council of Christian Education: 

Mrs. Mary Susan Steele Smith, Wagram ; Mrs. Egbert Davis, Sr., Winston- 
Salem ; J. J. Tarlton, Rutherfordton; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; R. S. Dickson, 
Charlotte ; A. Paul Bagby, Louisburg ; Edwin F. Perry, Rockingham. 

Nominees Representing North Carolina Baptist State Convention for Mem- 
bership on Board of Trustees for Allied Church League: 

R. E. Price, Rutherfordton ; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory ; E. B. Goodin, Lincoln- 
ton ; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; R. C. Foster, Leaksville ; Grover H. Jones, 
High Point; L. E. Andrews, Lexington; J. H. Early, Winston-Salem; J. G. 
Pritchard, Windsor ; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City ; T. E. Story, North Wilkes- 
boro ; Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro ; LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; R. S. Averett, 
Winston-Salem ; Carey B. Taylor, Winston-Salem ; Santford Martin, Win- 
ston-Salem ; E. Yates Webb, Shelby ; E. C. Roach, Kannapolis ; F. H. 
Brooks, Smithfield ; A. Lincoln Fulk, Washington ; B. A. Bowers, Ridge- 
crest ; M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort; Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington; Harry 
B. Caldwell, Greensboro ; C. H. Durham, Lumberton ; John A. Oates, Fay- 
etteville; Clarence Poe, Raleigh; I. G. Greer, Thomasville ; J. A. McMillan, 
Thomasviile ; L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh ; M. A. Huggins, Raleigh ; B. M. 
Covington, Wadesboro ; A. Paul Bagby, Louisburg ; C. B. Deane, Rocking- 
ham; E. N. Johnson, Fair Bluff; M. L. Banister, Oxford; Walt N. John- 
son, Salisbury; E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; James M. Hayes, Winston-Salem; 
J. Y. Joyner, La Grange ; Don C. Young, Asheville ; W. H. Weatherspoon, 
Raleigh; J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; M. M. Jernigan, Dunn; H. B. 
Anderson, Durham; Theo B. Davis, Zebulon ; L. R. Varser, Lumberton; 
E. N. Gardner, Henderson ; Mrs. T. H. Plemmons, Charlotte ; Mrs. W. E. 
Goode, Scotland Neck; Miss Alma Moose, Charlotte; Mrs. T. L. Cashwell, 
Gastonia ; W. B. Carr, Mooresville ; H. K. Masteller, Asheboro ; Wm. Har- 
rison Williams, Charlotte. 

26. The afternoon's session adjourned following prayer by Wilson Wood- 
cock, Greensboro. 

TUESDAY— Evening Session 

27. This session centered on Foreign Missions. Special recognition was 
given to the following North Carolina Missionaries, detained at home, because 
of the emergency of war : 

Miss Attie T. Bostick, Pachow, China; L. Bun Olive, Chinkiang, 
China; Arthur S. Gillespie, Kaifing, Honan, China; J. C. Powell, Shaki 
Nigeria, Africa; Mrs. J. C. Powell, Shaki Nigeria, Africa; Mrs. T. Neil 
Johnson, University of Shanghai, China ; L. E. Blackman, Hawaii ; P. 
W. Hamlett, Wisih, China; Mrs. P. W. Hamlett, Wisih, China; W. W. 
Lawton, Jr., Kaifing, Honan, China ; Mrs. W. W. Lawton, Jr., Kaifing, 
Honan, China. 

28. After the singing of "Jesus Shall Reign" and 'When I Survey the 
Wondrous Cross," I. T. Newton, Whiteville, offered prayer, and was fol- 
lowed by the singing of "Jesus Calls Us." 

29. By order of the Convention, it was agreed that the Order of Business 
be changed to consider the Truett Memorial, American Bible Society, and the 
Baptist Bible Institute at this time. 



30 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

30. In behalf of the Memorial to honor the late George W. Truett the fol- 
lowing motion signed by several pastors was presented by W. Perry Crouch, 
Asheville, and upon his motion adopted. 

A MOTION 

Since Dr. George W. Truett, late Pastor of First Baptist Church of 
Dallas, Texas, past President of the Southern Baptist Convention, and 
of the Baptist World Alliance, and Prince of Baptist Preachers, was 
born in North Carolina ; and 

Since a movement has been launched to establish a fitting and lasting 
memorial to Dr. Truett in the form of an Administration-Library-Chapel 
building on the campus of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
with which Dr. Truett was connected for so many years as member of 
and chairman of the Board of Trustees ; and 

In view of the great need for such building on the campus of the 
Southwestern Seminary where facilities are completely inadequate for the 
present large student body, 

We petition the Baptist State Convention to endorse this movement to 
the churches and friends of Dr. Truett in North Carolina and urge them 
to have a part in this worthy movement. 

31. I. Stuart McElroy, District Secretary of the American Bible Society, 
Richmond, Virginia, spoke on the wide range of work now promoted by the 
Society and expressed sincere gratitude to North Carolina Baptists for their 
loyal support. The work of the Society was strongly endorsed by the Con- 
vention. 

32. The Convention approved the following motion submitted by Wilson 
Woodcock, Greensboro, in the interest of the Baptist Bible Institute : 

MOTION ON BAPTIST BIBLE INSTITUTE 

Since the Southern Baptist Convention has authorized the Baptist 
Bible Institute to go into the field for $200,000.00 with which to erect a 
men's dormitory and a library building, which will be the first buildings to 
be erected at the institution in its history ; and 

Because there is now no adequate facilities for the housing of men 
students, making it necessary every year to refuse admittance to many ; 
and 

Because of the great record of the Institute in ministering to neg- 
lected people of that section, I move that this Convention look with favor 
upon the effort to raise $10,000.00 in North Carolina for this $200,000.00 
building fund and that the churches be requested to put this object in 
their budgets or take special collections for it during 1945. 

33. Eugene I. Olive, Wake Forest, Chairman, read the report of the Board 
of Directors of Biblical Recorder, and upon his motion the report was adopted, 
following a discussion by Editor L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, who called attention 
to the special service of Chairman Olive whose term of office expires with 
this Convention. 

REPORT OF DIRECTORS OF BIBLI.CAL RECORDER, 
INCORPORATED 

The Directors of Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, submit herewith to 



Annual of Session 1944 31 

the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina their report for the year 
ended September 30, 1944. 

Two meetings of the Directors have been held. The first was on 
January 18, 1944. At this time matters of business transacted included 
organization of the Board, election of an executive committee, revision 
of the printing contract and salary schedules, and the discussion of other 
items concerned with the publication of the paper. 

The second meeting was held on October 17, 1944, for the purpose of 
reviewing the year's record, receiving and examining the reports of the 
Business Manager and the Auditors, and adopting this report to the 
Convention. 

The Directors noted with satisfaction and desire to call to the Con- 
vention's attention the fact that there has been a steady increase in the 
Biblical Recorder's circulation and income, as may be seen from the 
following statements : 

Circulation Clubs 

September 30, 1943 18,447 September 30, 1943 931 

December 31, 1943 21,379 December 31, 1943 1,011 

March 31, 1944 25,243 March 31, 1944 1,050 

June 30, 1944 26,193 June 30, 1944 1,043 

July 31, 1944 26,433 July 31, 1944 1,047 

August 31, 1944 26,689 August 31, 1944 1,033 

September 30, 1944 26,874 September 30, 1944 1,042 

Net gain for year 8,427 

Classification of Circulation 
As of October 12, 1944 

Individuals @ $2.00 1,047 

Pastors (Convention list) @ $1.50 1,093 

Every-Family Plan @ $1.20 9,977 

Club Plan @ $1.50 14,949 27,066 



Complimentaries 175 



Total circulation, October 12, 1944 27,241 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 
12 Months Ended September 30, 1944 
Receipts : 

Advertising $ 3,921.70 

Circulation 36,686.62 

Sale of Cuts 231.44 

Unremitted Withholding Tax Deducted 

from Employees' Pay 125.22 

Miscellaneous 15.90 

Baptist State Convention 3,300.00 

Total receipts $44,280.88 

Bank balance September 30, 1943 138.55 



Total receipts and bank balance $44,419.43 



32 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Disbursements : 

To Increase Postage Deposit $ 25.00 

Advertising 344.07 

Insurance 55.32 

Miscellaneous 324.89 

News Correspondents 46.00 

Office Expense 462.84 

Postage 2,123.88 

Printing Contract 18,845.21 

Print Paper Purchased 7,660.83 

Rent 799.20 

Retirement Annuity 334.80 

Salaries 12,079.76 

Stationery 25.95 

Telephone 150.76 

Travel 403.23 

Furniture and Fixtures Purchased. . . . 216.34 
Drayage, Demurrage and 

Packing Paper 173.59 

Unremitted Withholding Tax Septem- 
ber 30, 1943, Remitted to Collec- 
tor this Period 258.30 

Total disbursements $44,329.97 

Cash and bank balance September 30, 

1944 89.46 



The foregoing financial statement is a part of the audit made by 
A. T. Allen & Company, Certified Public Accountants. From their 
comments we quote the following: 

"We found the books in balance and excellently kept. Trial 
balances and financial and operating statements are being regu- 
larly prepared. 

"Our examination did not disclose any evidence of irregulari- 
ties and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly 
handled and all accounted for. 

"We hereby certify that, we have audited the books and records 
of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, Raleigh, North Carolina, 
for the twelve months ended September 30, 1944, and prepared 
the within statement. In our opinion the correct financial con- 
dition of the business is shown, together with the result of opera- 
tions for the twelve months ended September 30, 1944." 

Attention is called to the fact that the total amount received from the 
Convention funds is $3,300.00, as compared with $7,200.00 during the year 
ended September 30, 1943, and as compared with $12,098.96 during the 
year ended September 30, 1942. This saving to the Convention has been 
made possible by the Biblical Recorder's enlarged income from circula- 
tion, in spite of the fact that costs of printing have risen. Additional 
expenses have been incurred also for salary increases and for the employ- 



Annual of Session 1944 33 

ment of extra office help needed to do the work involved as a result of 
the large circulation. We respectfully request the Convention to provide 
an amount not to exceed $5,000.00 to be used as and if it is needed to help 
defray the expenses of publication during the next year. 

Readers of the Biblical Recorder are aware of the quality of its work- 
manship and contents. The change in format, type, and size was made 
necessary because of governmental limitations on the amount of print 
paper available. As soon as these limitations are removed, the appear- 
ance and size of the paper will be restored to its former status. 

The Directors desire to express to the Convention their appreciation 
of the efficient work which has been done by Dr. Carpenter and the mem- 
bers of the office staff and by the Bynum Printing Company in keeping 
the Biblical Recorder going regularly to its growing constituency. From 
the report of the editor we learn that he has filled Sunday engagements 
during the year in approximately forty churches, assisted in two Sunday 
School Training weeks, held one revival, and attended twenty-six asso- 
ciations ; and in addition has had many other special engagements. The 
Directors wish to commend the Editor, the General Secretary of the 
Convention and members of his staff, numerous pastors and other work- 
ers in the churches for their excellent service in enabling the Recorder 
to extend its ministry to such a large number of people. At the same 
time, they would remind the Convention that the paper is still reaching 
only approximately twenty-five per cent of the membership of our churches. 

The Directors, therefore, call upon pastors, denominational workers, 
and local church officers to assist in every proper way to extend the use- 
fulness of the Recorder to all the members of the churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene Olive, Chairman 
Lee C. Sheppard, Secretary 

34. The remainder of the evening program was devoted to Foreign Missions. 
Donald E. Myers, Wadesboro, read the scripture and offered prayer. The 
audience next sang the special arrangement of the song "Onward Baptist 
Comrades." 

A young ladies sextet from Wingate Junior College, accompanied and 
directed by Miss Dina Dominguez, sang "The Lord's Prayer." 

Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, State member of the Foreign Mission 
Board, introduced the Foreign Missions discussion. He first recognized the 
missionaries above named, and at his suggestion the Recording Secretary was 
requested by the Convention to express in writing the feeling of praise and 
gratitude for the faithful service of Charles E. Maddry, Richmond, on the 
occasion of his retirement as Executive Secretary of the Board on January 1, 
1945. 

Missionary L. Bun Olive was recognized. He spoke briefly and then intro- 
duced Missionary Arthur S. Gillespie, now of Wake Forest, who brought the 
special message on the theme "Southern Baptists and Foreign Amissions." 

35. After a prayer, offered by the closing speaker, the session adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

36. This session featuring the work of State Missions, opened with the 
singing of "Come, Thou Almighty King" and "I Need Thee Every Hour." 



34 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

37. President Herring led with various messengers joining in quoting scrip- 
ture passages and afterwards Elliott R. Stewart, Windsor, offered prayer. 

38. Chairman Wood announced the enrollment now included 1,186 mes- 
sengers and 150 visitors. 

39. With Zeno Wall, Shelby, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, presiding, 
the report of the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina (see Section 113, page 
121) was read by Superintendent I. G. Greer, who presented as speakers to 
the report, Miss Sarah Elmore of the Mills Home, and W. C. Reed of the 
Kennedy Home. 

40. The work of State Missions, presided over by General Secretary M. A. 
Huggins, Raleigh, was the next order. Secretary Huggins called attention to 
the various State Mission pastors. He next called upon L. L. Morgan, Sec- 
retary of Division of Sunday Schols ; Harvey Gibson of the Division of Train- 
ing Union, and R. T. Howerton, of the Division of Student Activities, each 
of whom brought reports on their respective work. 

In connection with the student work, Eugene I. Olive, Chaplain of Wake 
Forest College, reported on the fine spiritual attitude he observes on this col- 
lege campus. 

Other State Mission features included a short message, "My Work as an 
Associational Missionary" by Tom S. Lawrence, Winston-Salem. Clyde E. 
Baucom, Wilson, spoke on the theme, "Keep the Home Fires Burning." Paus- 
ing at this point in the State Mission program, J. S. Johnson, Fayetteville, read 
the scripture and offered prayer, and he was followed by special music from 
the Meredith College Sextet. 

Continuing, Secretary Huggins presented Carey P. Herring, Fairmont, who 
spoke on the subject "The Cooperative Program." 

After singing "Beneath the Cross of Jesus" and a prayer by Robert L. 
Moore, Mars Hill, Casper C. Warren, Charlotte, closed the subject on State 
Missions with the message "The Imperative Call for Militant Evangelism," 
and, after he offered prayer, the session adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

41. Messengers began to assemble for this session one to two hours in ad- 
vance of the scheduled opening. When the Convention convened at 2 :30 per- 
haps the largest group of messengers to attend a State Convention had over- 
flowed both the large church and Sunday School auditoriums. Their interest 
centered on the Christian Education Program to be presented at this session. 

42. After singing "Wonderful Words of Life," Luther Little, Charlotte, 
offered prayer. He was followed by Bruce Hartsell, Franklinton, who sang 
"Jerusalem." 

43. Following a custom adopted at a prior Convention each of the three 
seminaries were represented in the special message brought at this time by 
Hersey Davis, a member of the faculty of the Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Louisville, Ky. 

44. A suggestion by Charles H. Durham, Lumberton, that in view of the 
lack of seating capacity, the assembled messengers adjourn across the street 
to the auditorium of the First Methodist Church, was overruled by an over- 
whelming vote. 



Annual of Session 1944 35 

45. A special message on the theme "The Training of Ministers and Church 
Workers" was brought by Fred C. Schatz, New Orleans, La. 

46. The following report presented by Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte, 
was approved upon his motion with a supporting amendment to the motion by 
Arch C. Cree, Salisbury, that the present Committee composed of Wm. Har- 
rison Williams, J. Clyde Turner, C. B. Deane, L. R. Varser, LeRoy Martin, 
R. N. Simms and E. S. Summers be continued as the Committee on Constitu- 
tion Changes. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES 

The Committee appointed last year to suggest changes in the Con- 
stitution regrets the fact that it is not prepared to make a full report. 
Our study of the Constitution convinces us that many changes should be 
made, and that ample time be given to the study of these changes. We 
therefore make the following recommendation : 

(1) That a new committee be appointed or that this committee be 
continued and instructed to report at the 1945 session of the Convention. 

(2) That brethren be urged to write to the members of the committee 
suggesting any changes which in their judgment should be made. 

(3) That the committee be instructed to publish in the Biblical Re- 
corder at least six weeks before the meeting of the Convention any pro- 
posed changes in the Constitution. 

Wm. Harrison Williams, Chairman 
R. N. Simms, Sr. 
J. Clyde Turner 
C. B. Deane 
E. S. Summers 
LeRoy Martin 
L. R. Varser 

47. The hour having arrived for which the messengers had waited, Claude 
Gaddy, Raleigh, was recognized and he read from the Advance Report of the 
General Board (see Section 87, page 75) covering meetings of the Council 
on Christian Education, and thereafter sought to recognize the Presidents of 
each of the Baptist Colleges, but none of the institutional heads spoke. 

48. It was brought to the attention of the presiding officer that Governor 
J. Melville Broughton was in the audience. His Excellency was requested to 
come to the platform and following his brief words of response the Convention 
moved to the heart of the afternoon's business. 

49. For some weeks prior to the convening of the Convention, a great deal 
of discussion, pro and con, on the merging of Wake Forest and Meredith, had 
taken place. The question was now before the Convention for final action, 
and at this time R. S. Dickson, Charlotte, asked to be recognized. In a brief 
preface to the report, he stated that for many hours since the Convention had 
been in session friends of Meredith and friends of Wake Forest had labored 
in long conferences on the report. He observed that by the report neither 
side had won, but the cause of Christian Education among our Baptist Schools 
should be strengthened. He then read the report to one of the most attentive 
Baptist Convention groups ever assembled. As the report unfolded friends of 



36 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

the schools involved were inclined to voice their feelings by handclapping, until 
President Herring expressed the belief that such action was not representative 
of a Christian body and thereafter the audience was quiet. At the conclusion 
R. S. Dickson moved the adoption of the report which was seconded by John 
R. Knott, Charlotte, the salient features being that Meredith would continue 
as a four-year college for girls and that Wake Forest would be allowed to 
assume the status of a University and girls would be allowed to enter on the 
same basis as men. 

There followed a discussion of the report by Zeno Wall, Shelby, and Wm. 
Harrison Williams, Charlotte, representing the two viewpoints and John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville, and W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh, President of the Boards 
of Trustees of Wake Forest and Meredith respectively. 

The discussion terminated when the Convention approved the motion of 
Arch C. Cree, Salisbury, that all discussion cease and the vote be received 
which, when taken, was overwhelming in favor of the report that follows. 

SPECIAL REPORT RE WAKE FOREST-MEREDITH 

Whereas, Baptists of North Carolina face a day of unprecedented 
need and opportunity for Christian education ; and whereas, there is an 
imperative need for a more vital integration of all educational resources 
in order to meet these needs and opportunities, we offer the following 
resolutions : 

Be it resolved : 

1. We reaffirm the desire of this Convention to provide for our youth 
the opportunity which bears the full impact of the Christian faith. We 
believe that our schools should and must order their work to this end, 
taking care that in the arrangement of curricula the choices of their 
administration and faculty, along with the ideals and customs of campus 
life, primacy is given to the spirit and content of the Christian message 
as interpreted in the life and work of North Carolina Baptists. 

Thereby we shall have confidence that the graduates of these institu- 
tions will return to the communities and churches of our State, not only 
well trained in mind but also deepened in personal religious experience 
and faith, and committed to the responsibilities of Christian leadership in 
church and community. 

2. That Meredith College shall be and remain in its present location 
as a standard four-year "A" Grade College for young women, and that 
its plant, facilities and curriculum shall be enlarged and expanded to meet 
adequately the needs of the young women of our State for an institution 
of higher Christian education and culture. 

3. That Wake Forest College now has and shall continue to have full 
university status as an accredited "A" Grade University of highest Chris- 
tian education and culture ; that all classes of Wake Forest College shall 
be open for the admission of young women upon the same basis as young 
men, and that its plant, facilities and curriculum shall be expanded and 
enlarged to meet the needs of the young people of our State. 

4. That the present Council on Christian Education be continued as 
now constituted, with the following additions to its membership: (a) The 
members of the Education Committee of the General Board, and (b) 
seven members at large to be named by the Baptist State Convention. 
The Chairman of the Committee on Education of the General Board 
shall be the Chairman of the Council and the President of the State 
W.M.U. shall be the Secretary. 

That in the interim between the sessions of the Convention the Council 
shall have charge and control of the entire program of education of the 
Convention, except that in the event of disagreement between the Council 



Annual of Session 1944 37 

.and the -Beafd-o-f- -Trustees of any institution supported by the Conven- 
ti on., eit her the Council or the Board of Trustees of such institution shall 
have, the right of appeal to the General Board, and the decision of the 
General Board thereon shall he final and binding. Any action by the 
Council - during the interim between the sessions of the Convention shall 
be-binding upon the Convention. 

It shall be the duty of the Council to meet at the call of the Chairman, 
at least quarterly, and it shall perform, among others, the following 
duties : 

(1) It shall provide ways and means for bringing about whatever co- 
operation is necessary for the proper correlation of the work and pro- 
grams in the various educational institutions supported by the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention, to the end that these institutions may 

be of the greatest possible service in the cause of Christian education. p^>- 

(2) It shall study the needs of the various educational institutions and 
their ability to meet these needs, and upon the basis of its findings, it shall ^ 
allocate to the institutions such funds as may be made available by the 
Convention for Christian education, with- the right to designate how such 
f-u«4s— may- be expended within the various institutions. 

(3) The Council may, in its discretion, out of funds provided for 
allocation, employ an Executive Secretary, and such other assistance as 
may be deemed necessary to carry out effectively the duties herein out- 
lined, and all other duties imposed upon the Council by this resolution. 

(4) To formulate and promote plans for increasing the interest in and 
the support of these various educational institutions, and to make an 
annual report in detail to the Convention upon all the work and findings 
of the Council. 

Resolved further, that our churches and our membership through 
the State be asked and urged to give the fullest support to and co- 
operation in our program of Christian education, in such way as each 
church and member may elect, to the end that our educational institutions 
may serve the denomination in an efficient and effective manner. 

50. W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, was recognized and offered the following 
motion, giving the required notice in order to amend the Constitution of the 
Convention, involving the election of the Trustees of the Convention's Boards 
and Institutions. 

NOTICE TO CHANGE CONSTITUTION 

In view of the widespread feeling that something should be done to 
make our Baptist educational institutions more fervently evangelistic 
and more positively Christian, and, in view of the need to bring our in- 
stitutions closer to the heart of our churches, and believing the following 
action is a step in this direction, we the undersigned give notice that 
tomorrow we will present a resolution to change paragraph a, Section 1, 
Article VII, of the Constitution of the Baptist State Convention, which 
has to do with election of trustees of the Convention's institutions. The 
suggested change to place all trustees of the Convention on a rotating 
system, as is now true of the General Board and the Biblical Recorder 
Directors. 

Paragraph a, Section I, Article VII as changed would read as follows : 

The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect the trus- 
tees of said corporation and their regular term of office shall be four 
years. At the first election by the Convention one-fourth of the board 
of trustees shall be elected to serve for one year, one-fourth for two 
years, one- fourth for three years and the remaining one- fourth for four 



38 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

years. At each subsequent regular annual session of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina one-fourth of the members of the Board 
of Trustees of said corporation shall be elected by the Convention to 
succeed the members of said Board retiring, the retiring members being 
ineligible for reelection until one year has transpired. This change to 
become effective now. 

51. Following a prayer by J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro, the session 
adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

52. This session centering around Social, Civic and World Service opened 
with the singing of "Rescue the Perishing," after which Missionary J. C. Pow- 
ell offered prayer, and again the audience joined in singing "Jesus Calls Us." 

53. General Secretary Huggins read the report prepared by the Historical 
Commission (see Section 116, page 128) being a part of the General Board's 
Report. 

54. The Trustees of the Convention presented through their Secretary 
R. L. McMillan, Raleigh, the following report, which upon motion by M. A. 
Huggins was approved. 

REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 
OF NORTH CAROLINA— 1944 

The trustees of the Convention, as elected by the 1943 session of the 
Convention, are F. H. Brooks, P. H. Wilson and R. L. McMillan. F. H. 
Brooks is Chairman and R. L. McMillan is Secretary. 

Only two meetings have been held by the trustees during the year. 
The following matters of business were transacted : 

1. The trustees made transfer of certain lots in Sunset Park, Wil- 
mington, to the North Carolina Baptist Foundation, and in return took 
title to certain other lots, upon which lots the Sunset Park Baptist 
Church is located. 

They also took title to a house and lot, now serving as the pastor's 
home for Sunset Park Church. They also transferred title to house and 
lot owned by the corporation, and which was sold in order to buy the new 
lot and pastor's home referred to above. 

2. In the meeting on August 9 the trustees, upon instructions from the 
Executive Committee of the General Board, endorsed a note signed by 
the Trustees of the Carolina Beach Baptist Church, made to the Carolina 
Building and Loan Association of Wilmington, in the amount of $20,000. 

3. The Convention requires bonds of certain officers and employees. 
Heretofore bonds have been in force of individual officers and employees. 
During the year the bonds were changed to a blanket bond, covering all 
officers and employees who handle any money, in the amount of $10,000 
for each employee and the General Secretary and Treasurer. The Gen- 
eral Secretary and Treasurer is also bonded for an additional $15,000. At 
practically the same cost this new blanket bond provides full protection 
for all employees of the Convention. 

R. L. McMillan, Secretary. 



Annual of Session 1944 39 

55. A report from the Enrollment Committee showed a registration of 1,598 
messengers and 222 visitors. 

56. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, offered in behalf of the Committee on Pub- 
licity the Committee's report and upon his motion it was approved as follows : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

The Committee on Publicity wishes to express deep gratitude for help 
and courtesies extended during the 114th annual session of the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention. 

First of all, we wish to thank the personnel of the First Church of 
Charlotte for assistance rendered ; to the host pastor, Dr. Casper C. 
Warren, and to Educational Director J. M. Crowe, who so graciously 
granted us adequate office space and who contributed equipment and mate- 
rial for our use, and to the Charlotte Typographical Union for the loan 
of additional needed equipment. 

Your committee feels that we have indeed been fortunate in having 
the services of Miss Martha Ann Allen, of Wake Forest, official reporter 
for this Convention, who is rendering, and has rendered, splendid services 
in reporting its proceedings. She has rendered similar services in previous 
Conventions and her work has been of an exceedingly high order. 

The two Charlotte daily papers have been especially helpful and co- 
operative and have been very liberal in the use of space given to cover 
the reports of the Convention. This committee is grateful to The Char- 
lotte Observer and to the special representative of that paper, Mrs. Hazel 
Trotter, for the splendid and complete reports given, and to Miss Freck 
Sproles, special reporter for The Charlotte News, who has rendered a 
like service for that paper, and to both day and night bureaus of the 
Associated Press, for complete and accurate coverage of the proceed- 
ings of this Convention for State and Southwide papers. Mr. A. F. 
Littlejohn has been on the floor of the Convention, representing the 
Associated Press, and Miss Joanne Edson has been present for the 
United Press. Mr. Erwin A. Lemons, of The Greensboro Daily News, 
has been on the Convention floor reporting the proceedings for that paper. 

Garland Hendricks has rendered good service in assisting the editor 
in reporting the proceedings of the Convention for the Biblical Recorder. 

Recognition should be given C. R. Austin, special representative for 
The Charlotte News, and a member of the Publicity Committee for the 
fine work he has done in preparing for the work of the committee, and 
for the splendid services he has rendered before and during the Con- 
vention sessions. 

To all these, and to any who may have in any way contributed to the 
work and success of this committee, we wish to express our deep and 
abiding appreciation. 

57. The Convention approved the report from the Committee on Place and 
Preacher for the 1945 Convention upon motion by Claude Gaddy, Raleigh, as 
follows : 

Place: First Baptist Church, Raleigh. 
Preacher: Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville. 
Alternate: W. D. Poe, Oxford. 



40 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

58. A unanimous report was received from the Committee to Report on 
the General Board's Report and upon motion by T. P. Pruitt, the report was 
adopted as follows : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON THE 
GENERAL BOARD'S REPORT 

We, your committee, recommend the adoption of the General Board's 
recommendations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 as submitted. 

We recommend the adoption of the 6th recommendation with the fol- 
lowing addition, which we find will eliminate any conflict with section 
seven of the recommendations : Add after the figures 1945, in line seven, 
the following 'Above the $130,000.00 as set forth in the report of the 
Council on Christian Education, and made the recommendation of the 
General Board in its 7th section." 

With reference to Recommendation No. 12, your committee recom- 
mends the following disposition be made of same : 

That while recognizing the Baptist Hospital should be enlarged in the 
near future to meet the needs, both of the Hospital and the Wake 
Forest Bowman Gray Medical School, we are of the opinion that the 
recommendation of the General Board that the trustees of the North 
Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc., be authorized to borrow $600,000.00 
to meet the cost of an immediate building program should not be adopted 
at this time, but should be deferred for a year in order that our people 
may be informed of the needs for this enlargement and be in a position 
to render an informed opinion upon the question when and if said prop- 
osition is hereinafter presented to the Convention. 

59. Upon the reading of the Report of the Radio Committee (see Section 
99, page 99) it was approved upon motion by M. A. Huggins. 

60. Under the general topic of "The Men in Our Churches," an oral report 
and discussion was presented by C. R. Browning, Jr., Asheville. Thereafter 
a strong address was brought by L. A. Martin, Lexington, President of the 
Allied Church League. 

61. A. D. Kinnett, Burlington, brought the following majority report from 
the Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness, which was followed 
by a minority report on the division concerning War and Peace, read by 
Recording Secretary C. B. Deane in behalf of Mrs. R. L. Councilman. 

MAJORITY REPORT SOCIAL SERVICE AND CIVIC 
RIGHTEOUSNESS 

Your Committee is charged with the responsibility of bringing before the 
Convention the general problems which confront our churches concerning hu- 
man betterment, and to offer the best recommendations as to how they may be 
met and solved from a Christian point of view. 

Christian citizenship is of prime importance in our Baptist ranks in North 
Carolina and throughout the world. The 551,000 Baptist people in our State 
should become a marching army for social service and civic righteousness. 
Our people should bring to bear the highest type of Christian thinking and 
living upon all phases of human activity. We should take a positive stand 
on the side of social and political justice for all the people. We must ever 
see all men through the eyes of Jesus, and work for their social and spiritual 
enrichment. 



Annual of Session 1944 41 

Temperance 

The Social Service Committee of the Convention has continued its fight 
against alcohol in North Carolina. Not only has it made a fight through 
its own channels and through the efforts of the individual members of the 
Committee, but it has played a very important part in bringing about a con- 
certed effort on the part of the men and women in the various Christian 
churches of the State, which resulted in the organization of the Allied Church 
League for the Abolition of Beverage Alcohol. 

This organization is made up of a group of people from about thirteen 
Christian denominations in North Carolina. It is not a church organization 
in the sense that it functions under church direction; it is church sponsored 
and church supported but governed and controlled by a Board of Trustees 
of its own, elected by various groups. 

The organization is headed by Dr. I. G. Greer, with M. A. Huggins serv- 
ing as Treasurer, Dr. H. I. Glass as Secretary, and L. A. Martin, as Execu- 
tive Director. 

The work of the organization is making excellent progress. The field 
is a fertile one and there is much to do. The organization is laying a 
foundation that will require time, but on this foundation something per- 
manent in temperance work will be built. 

The main point of emphasis in the work of the Allied Church League is 
education — education that will not only warn the youth and their parents 
of the destructive nature of alcohol on character, but on their physical being 
as well. Legislation will be asked to make our acts consistent with our 
teachings. 

In time, it is hoped that the State Department of Education will volun- 
tarily set in motion a broad plan of education covering the temperance 
question, and point out what science teaches on the liquor evil. 

The Allied Church League is also publishing a monthly paper, Tomorrow, 
which now has a circulation of more than ten thousand. 

Your Committee calls upon Christian people everywhere to set an example 
in temperance in their personal lives and in their homes. We feel that Chris- 
tians must bear their responsibility for the prevalence of so much social drink- 
ing in our day. It is futile to call upon the state for political action unless 
Christian people themselves shall conform to the highest standard of temperance. 

We recommend to the Allied Church League for the Abolition of Beverage 
Alcohol that it formulate plans looking forward to the strict enforcement of 
present laws, and the addition of other laws that will reduce the drinking evil 
in our state and the curtailment of liquor advertising through our daily news- 
papers and on the radio. 

We recommend to the Allied Church League for the Abolition of Beverage 
Alcohol that, at the appropriate time, a petition shall be presented to the state 
legislature seeking a state referendum on the liquor question looking forward to 
outlawing of the liquor traffic in North Carolina. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

It does not seem right for your committee to pass by the alarming 

situation that flourishes in connection with the morality of youth. For the 

years of the war civic organizations, recorders' courts, state health officials 

and the Federa' Bureau of Investigation have sounded warning after warn- 



42 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

ing over the mounting rate of delinquency. A report before the National 
Probation Association last April revealed that in 148 juvenile courts of all 
cities and counties above 50,000 there has been an increase of 8% of cases 
tried from 1940 to 1941, and still further increase of 9% from 1941 to 1942, 
when 112,889 cases were tried. J. Edgar Hoover of the F.B.I, reports that 
the arrest of girls under 21 rose from 9,675 in 1941 to 15,068 in 1942. 

There are many cases of this condition over our land. In a time of 
war there is always a restlessness which affects youth no less than adults. 
The sinister influences of war reach out over the lands affected and cast 
their shadows over young and old alike. The stabilizing influence of the 
school slips. It was reported by the secretary of the National Education 
Association to its annual meeting in Indianapolis last June that 2,000,000 
boys and girls between fourteen and eighteen years of age had left school 
to work; that a half million of them were fourteen and fifteen, and many 
thousands under fourteen. Broken homes, frequently with both parents 
away most of the day and night, at work or in government service, com- 
plicates the problem. The glamor of the uniform on any enlisted man too 
often proves a stumbling block for unwary and undirected girls, whose steps 
are wayward turned. 

As a Convention, we place ourselves on record to endeavor to help youth 
and lead it in ways of stability and right living. We would urge our men 
and women by example, no less than by precept, to direct aright the be- 
havior of our youth. To that end we urge the strengthening of family ties 
in the midst of conditions that all but tear them to pieces. We would call 
attention to the importance of boys and girls continuing their school work 
in order to meet the needs of that generation of men and women of which 
they will be a part. We favor the strengthening of our juvenile courts and 
probation offices, so that they may give more particular attention to offend- 
ers both at the time of the offense and in following up the career of the 
offender. Most of all, we pray for a church ministry, from pulpit to the last 
class room, from minister to every person under whose care children may 
come, that will lead into the abundant life all the children of our land. 

War and Peace 

We register our opposition to war, but acquiesce in the efforts to win 
the present conflict since our liberties and the world's freedom are endan- 
gered. The position and the attitude of Baptists toward their country in 
time of war is one of loyalty and patriotism. We have never failed our 
nation during a national crisis of this nature. 

We believe that the present war is one between right and wrong, one be- 
tween dictators and free men. Our nation is not fighting for more territory, 
nor to deprive other people of their possessions, but we are fighting for life 
itself, including liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and the right to wor- 
ship God according to the dictates of conscience. We should, therefore, 
pray without ceasing for our men who are fighting for our freedom. We 
should for their sake, if for no other, keep our churches spiritually strong 
so that when they return home from the camps and the battlefields, scarred 
in many cases, in body, mind and soul, they will find in the churches which 
they left a cower divine that will rebuild their faith in God and also re- 
habilitate their whole lives along spiritual iines. Their sacrifices stand as 



Annual of Session 1944 43 

a daily challenge to our churches to consecrate themselves unto the Lord 
and thus become thoroughly "furnished unto all good works." 

To avoid future wars as far as it is humanly possible, we heartily 
approve a world organization backed by military force if necessary, which 
will outlaw war and guarantee the peace of the world. We further register 
our conviction that it is the obligation and the privilege of our Baptist 
churches, along with all other Christian churches, to lay the foundation and 
to furnish the moral leadership for the peace of the world. We do not feel 
that a world organization in itself is sufficient to maintain world peace. The 
principles of Christianity, therefore, must be its foundation. Before the 
world can have peace it must first have the Prince of Peace, and it is the 
primary business of the Christian Churches to give the Prince of Peace to 
all the nations. 

Religious Freedom 

We believe that religious freedom is a God given and inherent right to be 
enjoyed by every soul, and that it is the mother of all freedoms. We believe 
that there should be full and unfettered religious liberty for all men, and 
that they should be given the right to worship God anywhere in the world 
according to the dictates of their conscience, and also to preach the gospel 
anywhere in the world they might feel led to do so. 

We urge that outstanding Christian statesmen who know the rights of the 
soul as well as the body, who will both interpret and champion the rights of 
the mind, to think, to speak, and to worship without any threat of intimidation 
from rulers, civil governments, religious potentates or hierarchies be put on 
the Peace Council. We feel that religious liberty should be at the heart of the 
peace treaty, and that every man should be guaranteed the right to proclaim 
his own religious beliefs and determine his own religious affiliation. 

Neither civil governments nor hierarchies must be allowed to put the 
slightest embargo on any man's conscience or oppress any human being in 
his religious opinions. The Peace Treaty should make this clear to all the 
world, and able Christian men should sit in that Conference to make it clear 
to statesmen and politicians who do not know it. 

Race Relations 

Race relations are not confined to the Negro and white races here in the 
South. The problem has been in the world since races began to live along- 
side of each other. Sometimes it is the white man and the red man; again 
it is the Arab against the Jew; then it is the German lording it over the 
Jew, and the Japanese against the white, and the white against the Negro and 
so it goes with us, and it presents one of the most acute and aggravated prob- 
lems with which any peoples must deal. 

Here in the land of the free and the home of the brave we have a race 
problem between the white man and the Negro. We feel that the two fac- 
tors that will bring about better relations between the white man and the 
Negro is embodied in the two words, Education and Christianity. Education 
can go far in breaking down the barriers that seperate the two races. Chris- 
tianity must go further in creating mutual understanding and in manifesting 
that spirit which makes for the common good of all. 

We are grateful to note that our Southern Baptist Convention and North 
Carolina State Baptist Convention are interesting themselves in Negro Minis- 



44 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

terial Education. This will mean a more adequately trained leadership among 
Negro preachers which will result in better understanding between the two 
races. We wish to commend also the North Carolina W.M.U. in their efforts 
to better interracial relations. When we bring to bear Christian Education and 
vital Christianity upon the race problem, we have gone far in solving it. 

We, therefore, call upon the people of our churches and especially our 
pastors to see that the Negro race has a fair opportunity to secure an educa- 
tion, and to know Jesus Christ as Saviour and Lord. We call upon our 
government, both local and federal, to see that our Negro brothers are accorded 
justice in the courts, and that he has a fair chance in the business world in 
matters of employment and wage. 

We call upon all of our churches and ministers to see that he is treated 
fairly and Christian in all his relationships with his white neighbors. 

Our Relation to Other Denominations 
The war has brought the nations of the earth close together. It has taught 
them the necessity of cooperating one with the other for the mutual good of all. 
Cooperation is the foundation lesson men n«ed to learn today in every realm 
of activity. Cooperation is a good Baptist word. Our Baptist people probably 
understand the word better than any other religious group because it is the 
one link that binds us together in the local church and in our denominational 
work. By it we have built up our churches and our denominational program 
of worldwide redemption. By it we have wrought more things than this world 
dreams of. 

The Baptists are neither unionist nor isolationist in their relationship to 
other Christian bodies and denominations. We believe that we have a dis- 
tinct and unique message to give to the whole world and that all people need 
our message and would be profited and blessed by it. With this conviction 
deep in our souls we refuse both the unionist and isolationist way of life for 
our churches and for our denomination. The unionist way would lead us into 
the broad highway of absorption and loss of identity, and the isolationist way 
would lead us down the narrow corridor of selfishness to death. Therefore, 
we reject both of these ways, and choose to continue in the historic Baptist 
way of cooperation. In those fields where we can cooperate with other de- 
nominations and other Christian organizations, our people have always done so 
and will continue to do so. Your committee believes that it is the desire of 
our local churches and of this Convention to cooperate with other denomina- 
tions in those fields of work and Christian activity where our united efforts 
will accomplish more by common participation than by each working separately. 
This is especially true right now in the field of religious freedom in the 
making of the new national and international structures for the post-war world. 
We should therefore cooperate with all denominations in securing the widest 
possible adoption of full religious freedom for all the people of the w r orld. We 
should also cooperate with other Christian bodies in North Carolina in efforts 
of moral reform and better citizenship. There is the field of juvenile delin- 
quency, the field of temperance, and of rehabilitation of prisoners, and of 
better race relationships, and many other similar fields where we can accomplish 
more by working together than separately. But it must always be understood 
that in these fields of work and areas of activity where we can cooperate for 
the common good, that our church polity and beliefs will in no way be in- 



Annual of Session 1944 45 

volved, and that it will be done without any sort of ecclesiastical or denomina- 
tional federation. With this understanding and in this spirit we stand ready to 
cooperate with other denominations and Christian bodies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. D. Kinnett, Chairman. 

MINORITY REPORT SOCIAL SERVICE AND CIVIC 
RIGHTEOUSNESS 

War and Peace 

We register our opposition to war in the belief that it is opposed to the 
philosophy of love, which is central in the teachings and example of Christ. 
Nevertheless, our country is at war. The position of Baptists toward their 
country in time of war has always been one of loyalty. We have never failed 
our nation during a national crisis of this nature. We desire at this time to 
urge upon the Convention and the churches, the necessity for courageous moral 
conquest on the home front. Our nation is calling for maximum support in the 
contribution of time, money and men. The response has been magnificent. At 
this response we rejoice, in the hope that this expenditure of human life will 
soon be ended and will result, not in decay and destruction, but in a new 
chance for all people of the world to experience the "four freedoms." We 
are reminded, however, that this result can only come through increasing moral 
vigilance and emphasis upon Christian precepts. For not only is war, itself, a 
danger to the moral and spiritual integrity of those who engage in it, but it 
creates inevitable conditions which aggravate the ordinary problems of life. 
Already we can see the effects of the war upon the problems of the family, 
race, education and economic conflict, as well as in the private lives of millions 
of people. As Christians we insist that even in war time, hatred of others 
must be avoided, even when we hate their evil deeds. God is concerned about 
all mankind, and as His children, it behooves us to pray for those who despite- 
fully use us. 

We would further continue to respond to the cause of humanitarian service 
in the name of Christ — cheerfully give for the relief of stricken people all over 
the world, minister to Axis prisoners in our own land, and care for the spiritual 
needs of our service men and women, through personal contacts in communities 
where they are found, and through the local churches, praying for them and 
keeping in touch with them, regularly. We should keep our churches growing 
spiritually so that when our men and women* return home, scarred, in many 
cases, in body, mind and soul, they will find the churches ready to help them 
rebuild or deepen their faith in God and to rehabilitate their whole lives upon 
spiritual lines. 

We rejoice in the many agencies that are planned for the acceptance of 
principles upon which an enduring peace may be formulated. We urge that 
Christ-like attitudes may be demonstrated at the peace table, and that con- 
ditions for rebuilding the world may be such to insure freedom and justice 
for all. To help to avoid future wars we heartily approve a world organization 
which will endeavor to outlaw war and guarantee the peace of the world. We 
further register our conviction that it is the obligation and privilege of our 
Baptist churches, along with all other Christian churches, to lay the foundation 
and to furnish the moral leadership for the peace of the world. We do not 



46 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

feel that a world organization in itself is sufficient to maintain peace. The 
principles of Christianity, therefore^ must be its foundation. Before the world 
can have peace it must first have the Prince of Peace, and it is the primary 
business of Christian churches to give the Prince of Peace to all nations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. R. L. Councilman. 

Upon the question to adopt the minority report on War and Peace, as pre- 
sented by Mrs. Councilman, the motion was lost. Thereafter the original re- 
port as presented was approved upon motion by A. D. Kinnett. 

62. President Herring recognized B. E. Morris, Durham, who presented 
Robert L. Humber, Greenville, who brought the closing address of the evening 
session on International Relations. 

63. After prayer by E. N. Johnson, Fair Bluff, the session adjourned. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

64. President Herring called the closing session to order at 9 :30 and the 
assembled messengers sang "Near the Cross" and "Blessed Assurance." Fol- 
lowing the singing of these songs, favorite passages of scripture were quoted 
by several messengers. 

65. Oscar Creech, Ahoskie, offered prayer. 

66. A special resolution offered by B. E. Morris on World Federation was 
referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

67. The following motion offered by L. J. Rainey, Grover, concerning alco- 
holic beverages was unanimously adopted : 

1. That the North Carolina Baptist State Convention (meeting in 
Charlotte, November 14-16, 1944, with 1,603 registered delegates), go on 
record as favoring the complete outlawing of the sale, use, and adver- 
tising of alcoholic liquors for beverage purposes ; 

2. That we do hereby request and petition the General Assembly of 
North Carolina to outlaw the sale, use, and advertising of all alcoholic 
liquors for beverage purposes within the State of North Carolina; 

3. That if the General Assembly of North Carolina does not wish to 
outlaw the sale, use, and advertising of all alcoholic liquors for beverage 
purposes without another vote of the people, we do hereby request and 
petition a referendum both on the sale, use, and advertising of all alco- 
holic liquors for beverage purposes within the State of North Carolina ; 

4. That the President, the General Secretary, and the Recording Sec- 
retary of this Convention constitute a committee who shall present the 
wishes and will of this Convention to the Governor-Elect and to the 
next General Assembly of North Carolina. 

68. Upon motion by Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte, the President, 
Recording Secretary and General Secretary were authorized to review and 
perfect the proceedings of this Convention. 

69. The President recognized J. S. Lynch, Winston-Salem, Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of the Baptist Hospital who presided during the dis- 
cussion of the Hospital Report (see Section 114, page 122). The report was 
adopted upon motion by Chairman Lynch, after a discussion of the work of 



Annual of Session 1944 47 

the Hospital and Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College, 
by Ray Brown, Administrator of the Hospital and Superintendent Smith 
Hagaman. 

70. A special musical selection, "The Lord Is My Shepherd," was offered at 
this time by Joe Hamrick and Mrs. Joe Hamrick. 

71. J. Louis Price, Hickory, brought the special scripture message and 
offered prayer. 

72. Upon motion by M. L. Bannister, Oxford, the report he presented as 
Chairman of the Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its In- 
stitutions and Members of the General Board, was adopted as follows : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE TRUSTEES OF 

THE CONVENTION, ITS INSTITUTIONS AND MEMBERS 

OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

Trustees of the Convention: 

Terms Expiring 1945: R. L. McMillan, Raleigh; P. H. Wilson, Raleigh; 
F. H. Brooks, Smithfield. 

The General Board: 

Terms Expiring 1947: W. T. Moss, Youngsville ; W. A. Elam, Shelby; J. 
Marshall Walker, Stovall ; G. W. Green, Spruce Pine ; Emmett Griffin, Mon- 
roe ; Miss Addie Mae Cook, Murphy ; T. C. Johnson, Kinston ; R. C. Shearin, 
Hickory; George Beavers, Apex; R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem; J. Roy Clif- 
ford, Lexington; C. Sylvester Green, Durham; R. F. Jarrett, Dillsboro; A. J. 
Buckner, Asheville ; James B. Turner, Laurinburg ; Carl L. Ousley, Siler City. 

Terms Expiring 1945: Fred Forester, Drexel, to replace J. D. McCready, 
Morganton, now in armed service ; Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford, to replace 
James H. Smith, Greensboro, now in armed service. Chas B. Trammel, Troy, 
to replace H. M. Hocutt, Biltmore, resigned. 

Baptist Foundation: 

Terms Expiring 1949: J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; W. L. Bennett, Wades- 
boro ; E. M. Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1947 : Grover H. Jones, High Point, to replace Oscar Hay- 
wood, Mount Gilead, deceased. 

North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc.: 

Terms Expiring 1946: Mrs. C. M. Myers, Elkin ; C. M. Scott, High Point, 
replacing J. Wilbur Crews and J. A. Naylor, deceased. 

Terms Expiring 1948 : Amos S. Bumgardner, Charlotte ; James G. Middle- 
ton, Wilmington; R. E. Earp, Selma ; J. S. Lynch, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Otis 
E. Tucker, Winston-Salem. 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina: 

Terms Expiring 1948: Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; 
Robert A. Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

Biblical Recorder Directors: 

Terms Expiring 1948: J. S. Hopkins, High Point; G. Carl Lewis, Wil- 
mington; E. C. Tatum, Cooleemee ; T. Lacy Williams, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1945 : Eugene Bullard, Wilmington, replacing Marshall 
Mott, resigned. 



48 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Term Expiring 1946 : Santford Martin, Winston- Salem, replacing John T. 
Wayland, Durham, now in the armed service. 

Campbell College: 

Terms Expiring 1948 : James I. Miller, Wilson ; W. C. Downing, Fayette- 
ville ; D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs ; W. H. Upchurch, Oxford ; W. C. 
Lucas, Asheboro. 

Chowan College: 

Terms Expiring 1945 : W. D. Boone, Winton ; B. J. Ward, Sunbury ; John 
O. Askew, Harrellsville; J. Elliott Ward, Sr., Elizabeth City; W. R. Parker, 
Woodland; Dennis Morgan, Elizabeth City. 

Terms Expiring 1946 : W. J. Rountree, Hobbsville ; Harry Stephenson, 
Pendelton; W. T. Love, Jr., Elizabeth City; George Gibbs, Murf reesboro ; 
A. E. Bowen, Windsor ; H. C. Newbold, Elizabeth City. 

Terms Expiring 1947 : John M. Elliott, Edenton ; Mrs. P. D. Sewell, Mur- 
freesboro; W. A. McGlohon, Murfreesboro ; J. Craig Revelle, Murf reesboro ; 
Raynor Woodard, Conway; Harry Fereba, Camden. 

Terms Expiring 1948 : George T. Underwood, Murfreesboro ; Mrs. Sallie 
Parker, Jackson; D. P. Medlin, South Mills; Merrill Evans, Ahoskie ; Charles 
H. Jenkins, Aulander ; Lowell K. Powell, Ahoskie. 

(The committee expressed the wish that Mr. J. H. Matthews, Windsor, who 
is ill, and who has served as Chairman for some years, might be elected as 
an honorary trustee.) 

Mars Hill College: 

Terms Expiring 1948 : W. T. Duckworth, Asheville ; W. Marvin Scruggs, 
Charlotte ; Mrs. Rush Stroup, Shelby ; E. F. Watson, Spruce Pine ; W. H. 
Wray, Gastonia; Mrs. Bertha Carr, Hickory. 

Meredith College: 

Terms Expiring 1948 : Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh ; Z. M. Caven- 
ess, Raleigh ; C. T. Council, Durham ; J. Y. Joyner, La Grange ; LeRoy Martin, 
Raleigh ; Mrs. Anna Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

Wake Forest College: 

Terms Expiring 1948 : Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro ; Charles C. Holland, 
Hickory ; R. P. Holding, Smithfield ; A. J. Hutchins, Canton ; John A. Oates, 
Fayetteville ; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City ; Basil M. Watkins, Durham ; 
J. C. Watkins, Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

73. Having given notice on yesterday, Perry Crouch now presented the 
following motion to amend the Constitution which was approved : 

Paragraph a, Section 1, Article VII, as changed would read as 
follows : 

The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect the 
trustees of said corporation and their regular term of office shall be four 
years. At the first election by the Convention one-fourth of the board 
of trustees shall be elected to serve for one year, one-fourth for two 
years, one-fourth for three years and the remaining one-fourth for four 
years. At each subsequent regular annual session of the Baptist State 



Annual of Session 1944 49 

Convention of North Carolna one-fourth of the members of the Board 
of Trustees of said corporation shall be elected by the Convention to suc- 
ceed the members of said Board retiring, the retiring members being 
ineligible for reelection until one year has elapsed. 

74. Oscar Creech, Ahoskie, made the motion which was adopted that the 
1944 Annual be dedicated to the memory of Mrs. Wesley Norwood Jones. 

75. A report was received from the Baptist Foundation and read by M. A. 
Huggins as a matter of information. (See Section 117, page 129.) 

76. The next order was the electon of a President and three Vice Presidents 
of the Convention. 

The following nominations were received for President of the Convention : 
Sankey A. Blanton, Wilmington; Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill; Ralph A. Her- 
ring, Winston-Salem; and Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh. In the nomination of 
Ralph A. Herring, it was pointed out by Wra. Harrison Willams, that there 
was nothing in the Constitution to prevent the reelection of President Herring 
for a second term. On this point A. D. Kinnett, Burlington, in kindly deference 
to the presiding officer, insisted that his motion adopted at a prior Convention, 
"that it was the sense of the Convention that a President serve for only one 
year," prevail. The matter came to a vote upon motion by Wm. Harrison 
Williams and the Convention failed to sustain its former position and President 
Herring, who spoke to sustain the Convention's former action, remained a 
candidate for President. Upon the ballot Ralph A. Herring, Winston- Salem, 
was reelected President. 

77. In the nominations for Vice President, Arthur S. Gillespie, Wake For- 
est, was nominated for 1st Vice President, Tom P. Pruitt, Hickory, for 2nd 
Vice President, and R. A. Ellis, Salisbury, for 3rd Vice President. 

Upon motion by L. J. Rainey, Grover, the nominations were closed, and 
C. B. Deane, Recording Secretary, upon motion by John Arch McMillan, Thom- 
asville, cast the vote of the Convention for the Vice Presidents as nominated. 

78. A report was received from R. K. Redwine, Hickory, in behalf of Home 
Missions, which was adopted after an address by S. F. Dowis, of the Home 
Mission Board on the subject "City Missions in the Centennial Crusade." 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

The Home Mission Board recognizes that our obligation is not to the 
Southland but to all peoples and it is deeply concerned about giving the 
message of Christ to the whole world. However, we are keenly conscious 
that the length and breadth of power of our missionary spirit and pro- 
gram will depend on our home base. We cannot give that which we do 
not have ourselves. We must have a religion at home that is worth giv- 
ing to people abroad. When the people of the homeland come to know 
and do the will of Christ, we can teach the same to the world. 

Post-War 
The missionary and his message are indispensable both in times of 
peace and in times of war. The war will end some day and when it 
does we will doubtless face new needs and new opportunities. The Home 
Mission Board is vitally concerned about a post-war program and is 
giving it considerable study. You are urged to join in earnest and fre- 



50 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

quent prayer that we might wisely plan and effectively plan to worthily 
discharge our obligations to a post-war world. 

We can't make and maintain a peace program for the world until we 
learn to follow the unselfish principles of the Prince of Peace. H. G. 
Wells in 1916 saw clearly and spoke frankly with prophetic insight. 
"The thought of war," says Dr. Wells, "will sit like a giant over all 
human affairs for the next twenty years. It will say to all of us : 'Set 
your house in order; if you squabble among yourselves, waste time, liti- 
gate, muddle, snatch profits and shirk obligations, I will certainly come 
again. I have all your young men between 18 and 50, and killed and 
maimed such as I please, millions of them. I have wasted your sub- 
stance contemptuously. Now you have multitudes of male children be- 
tween the ages of nine and nineteen running among you. And behind 
them come millions of babies. But go on muddling, each for himself and 
his parish and his family, and none for all the world ; go on in the old 
way. Stick to your rights, stick to your claims, each one of you, make 
no concession and no sacrifices, obstruct, waste, squabble, and presently I 
will come again and take all that fresh harvest of life, and squeeze it into 
red jam between my fingers and mix it with mud of the trenches and 
feast on it before your eyes.' " 

What greater contribution can we make to the new order of the post- 
war world than to make the will of Christ known in the home land and 
get it done here? 

The Fields Are White 

Every field where the Home Board has labored through the years is 
ripening for a larger harvest and calling for more workers. Since we 
have been relieved of the debt load some enlargement has been possible. 
The Board plans even greater enlargement of the work in fields now 
occupied. 

There are some large groups for which we feel a special obligation: 
11,000,000 Negroes, 1,500,000 Mexicans and Spanish-speaking Americans, 
700,000 French, 600,000 Italians and more than 200,000 original Amer- 
icans, the Indians. If we add to these some smaller racial groups like the 
Chinese, Russians, Japanese and half a million Jews, we have a popula- 
tion of about 15,000,000 for whom we are providing less than one mis- 
sionary for each 55,000 people. 

Cooperative Program 

A highly satisfactory arrangement has been worked out in the various 
states that makes the City Alissions Program and the Country Church 
Program cooperative works participated in by the Home Mission Board 
and the State Convention. Rural workers have been placed in a few 
states and the work is making a good start. 

The City Missions Program has far surpassed the expectations of its 
most enthusiastic advocates. Missions have been established in 36 South- 
ern cities. These missionaries work in cooperation with the churches in 
the cities and enlist workers from the churches to do mission work. They 
reported enlistment of 19,494 volunteer workers last year. They also 
reported 6,279 professions and 4,666 additions to the churches. 



Annual of Session 1944 51 

In the Armed Forces 
More than 1,000 Southern Baptist ministers are serving in chaplaincies. 
No man is accepted for this service until endorsed by his denomination. 
The Home Mission Board is the certifying agency for Southern Baptist 
preachers. Dr. Alfred Carpenter and his committee not only pass on 
all applications, but they keep in touch with those who are appointed, 
receive regular reports from them and render valuable assistance to the 
men in the service. The Home Board furnishes financial assistance to the 
work of the chaplains where needed. Many expressions of appreciation 
come from the chaplains for the interest and assistance of our Board 
given the men in service. 

The Centennial Crusade 

We look forward to the Centennial Crusade of Southern Baptists as 
the most significant movement in the history of Southern Baptists. 

The Home Mission Board was charged with the responsibility of pro- 
moting the Evangelistic Crusade to win at least 1,000,000 souls to Christ 
in 1945. 

Through the providence of God and the gracious generosity of the 
First Baptist Church of Shreveport, Louisiana, we have Dr. M. E. Dodd 
to lead this Evangelistic Crusade. He comes with a most challenging, a 
most all inclusive program, one that will sweep us off our feet unless we 
get into it. Nothing that Southern Baptists might do in 1945 would make 
as great contribution to a new world order as giving themselves to God 
to win a million souls to Christ. 

79. A special address on the subject "Evangelism as Preparation for a 
Post-War World" was brought during the closing hour by M. E. Dodd, Shreve- 
port, La. 

80. The Committee on Enrollment reported a final registration of 1,670 
messengers and 223 visitors, the largest Convention registration in many years. 

81. Eugene Olive, Wake Forest, as Chairman of the Committee on Reso- 
lutions made the following committee report and upon his motion it was 
adopted : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee on Resolutions wishes to express for this Convention 
sincere gratitude : 

1. To Dr. C. C. Warren, pastor, and the membership of the First 
Baptist Church for the use of their building and facilities, for their 
numerous kindnesses in providing the conveniences and comforts that 
were essential to the functioning of this crowded Convention ; to the staff 
of workers, including ushers, janitors, committees, and all others who 
shared in making provision for the sessions of this body. 

2. To the pastors and members of all the Charlotte churches for their 
hospitality and assistance in making our stay here pleasant. 

3. To the hotels and places that have supplied us with food and other 
physical comforts, and to the people of Charlotte who opened their homes 
to visitors. 



52 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

4. To city officials, merchants, and other citizens who have provided 
in one way and another for our needs. 

5. To the Royal Ambassadors who have rendered efficient service as 
pages. 

6. To Mr. H. Grady Miller of Winston-Salem, who has led our sing- 
ing; to Mrs. L. K. Wiley of this church, who has played the organ and 
piano, and to all who have rendered special musical numbers, making 
thereby contributions to our worship and inspiration. 

7. To local newspapers, reporters and the press for giving full pub- 
licity to important matters coming before this Convention. 

8. Concerning the resolution introduced this morning calling for the 
Convention to endorse "The Declaration of the Federation of the World," 
your committee recommends : ' 

First : That the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, meeting 
in Charlotte on November 16, 1944, endorse the principle of world fed- 
eration and the establishment of such institutions as may be necessary to 
implement it in international life ; 

Second : That a copy of this statement be sent to the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention and to the Congress of the United States, requesting 
each of these bodies to take positive action in support of World Federa- 
tion and its establishment after this war. 

9. Concerning the work of the American Bible Society : 

Whereas, this Convention, together with the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and other Baptist state conventions, has already recognized the 
essential world-wide service rendered by the American Bible Society in 
its missionary non-profit work of translation, publication and distribution 
of the Scriptures, and has commended this work to the interest and 
financial support of our people, and 

Whereas, the American Bible Society today, in addition to the regular 
work of supplying Scriptures for World-wide Missions, is also (1) pro- 
viding New Testaments and other Scriptures for our Armed Forces, (2) 
supplying Scriptures in many languages for War Prisoners and Refugees 
and (3) preparing and sending large quantities of Scriptures to needy 
people in the war areas as soon as those lands are set free. 

Therefore be it resolved, in view of these needs and opportunities, 
First, that we earnestly request our churches and our people to make 
contributions to the work of the American Bible Society, all such con- 
tributions to be sent through the regular channels to the Baptist state 
headquarters office, designated for the American Bible Society, and 

Second, that we approve a special offering for this work to be pro- 
moted through the office of the General Secretary, and to be taken on a 
day suggested by him, or at such other time as may be more appropriate 
for the local churches. 

82. In the closing minutes President Herring called attention to the mem- 
bers of the Convention (see page 54) who had passed on since the last Con- 
vention, and at his request the audience stood in silent memory, after which a 



Annual of Session 1944 53 

special prayer was offered by President Herring. At the close of the prayer 
it was agreed that the Committee on Order of Business for 1945 make a place 
on the program for Memorials. 

83. M. L. Banister, Oxford, presented the following motion which was 
adopted : 

RECOMMENDATIONS FROM COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE 
MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF TRUSTEES 

In view of certain conditions which we found to prevail regarding the 
work of your Committee, and which we do not think it wise to introduce 
to this Convention at this time we wish to make recommendations as 
follows : 

1. That this Committee be called into session at least once between 
the sessions of the Convention, preferably two or three months before 
the annual sessions of the Convention. 

2. That a personal letter from the Chairman of the Committee be 
written to each Committee member some time before the meeting of the 
Committee, in which these members are asked to study the entire mem- 
bership of these Boards of Trustees, as well as the Constitution of the 
Convention, and any other information that might seem necessary to their 
work. 

3. That if recommendations, or suggestions, are to be made by the 
Boards, Executive Committee, Secretary, or other persons, or persons, 
they be placed in the hands of all the members of the Committee at least 
a month before the first meeting of this Committee, in order that they 
may at least have the opportunity to study these recommendations or 
suggestions before they are asked to vote on them. 

84. The closing song was "Bless Be the Tie That Binds." President Her- 
ring declared the One Hundred Fourteenth Annual Convention adjourned, as 
C. C. Warren, Charlotte, closed the session with prayer. 

Ralph A. Herring, President. 

Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary. 
November 16, 1944. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



54 N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Xote : We call attention to the fact that this list is made up from 
reports received from the associational clerks, to which we add any we 
may know about. We make this explanation because we realize that 
there are perhaps many who have not been included in the list. 

ABEE, OSCAR ALBION Connelly Springs 

BAITY, A. K North Wileksobro 

BEACH, W. R Winston-Salem 

BLE VINS, E Grassy Creek 

BOSTICK, WADE D Shelby 

BRACON, JAMES Mountain City, Tenn. 

CALDWELL, CHARLES A Mount Holly 

CH AUCE, SAM Hayesville 

CHURCH, LEE J Summit 

COLLIER, S. M Charlotte 

CUTSH AW, RUSH Marble 

DAVIS, FLOYD P ' Elizabeth City 

DENTON, LINCOLN Connelly Springs 

EGGERS, CLIFTON Marble 

FOSTER, J. A Roaring River 

GRIGGS, J. M Charlotte 

H AIRE, P. H West Jefferson 

HARRIS, RALPH Albemarle 

HAWKINS, J. P Culberson 

HAYWOOD, OSCAR Mt. Gilead 

HOLDEN, C. S Winston-Salem 

HUNEYCUTT, GEORGE A Faith 

HUNT, J. E Haynham 

HUNT, W. G Lumberton 

JORDAN, J. R Star 

LYON, T. M Traphill 

McKAUGH AN, J. A Winston-Salem 

MILLS. G. T Apex 

NELSON, E. R Henderson 

PALMER, THEODORE JACK Murphy 

SUMMEY, J. A Salisbury 

TATE, R. J Chesnee, S. C. 

TRIVETT, J. S Fleetwood 

TOTHERO W, JOHN Marble 

TURNER, CLAUDE K Concord 

TYNER, J. T Whiteville 

WASHBURN, D. G Shelby 

WEST, B. S West Asheville 

WHITLEY, B. G Greensboro 

WILCOX, D. H Winston-Salem 



PROGRAM 



NORTH CAROLINA PASTORS' CONFERENCE 

First Baptist Church, Charlotte, North Carolina 
November 13, 1944 



General Theme 

BAPTIST RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE POST-WAR ERA 

E. R. Stewart, Windsor, Presiding 

W. Earl Robinson, Saint Pauls, Song Leader 

Mrs. W. Earl Robinson, Pianist 



MONDAY AFTERNOON 

2 :30 Praise and Prayer D. M. Clemmons, Reidsville 

2 :45 Announcements 

2:55 War-time Facts and Trends in Baptist Statistics 

J. G. Blackburn, Lumberton 

3:15 Music 

3 :20 Stewardship Emphasis During Economic Prosperity 

R. L. Councilman, Windsor 

3 :40 Post- War Church Building Programs T. W. Fryer, New Bern 

4 :00 The Church's Approach to the Temperance Question 

I. G. Greer, Thomasville 

4:20 Music 

4 :25 Evangelism in the Post-War Years M. L. Mott, Winston-Salem 

4:45 Adjourn 



MONDAY EVENING 

30 Praise and Worship J. F. Roach, Lewiston 

40 Business 

55 Preaching that Meets Tomorrow's Needs G. D. Heaton, Charlotte 

15 Music 

20 A Demobilized Army Remobilized for Christ... H. Y. Gamble, Statesville 

40 A Faith that Triumphs B. E. Jones, Raleigh 

Adjourn 

J. W. Kincheloe, Jr., President 
E. R. Stewart, Vice President 
Z. A. Caudle, Secretary 



56 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

ALEXANDER (11)— Mrs. J. M. Childers, Mrs. H. C. Colvard, Mr. and Mrs. Jeffie 
Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Echerd, Taylorsville; Homer L. Good, Stony Point; 
James B. Lail, E. C. Shoe, Lucy Thompson, A. E. Watts, Taylorsville. 

ALLEGHANY (0)— 

ANSON (3)— W. A. Knight, J. Tillman Lake, Wadesboro; J. M. Pickler, Wingate. 

ASHE (2)— R. C. Ashley, Bina; Everette W. Powers, West Jefferson. 

ATLANTIC (14)— C. A. Abernethy, Marshallberg; M. O. Alexander, Beaufort; A. L. 
Benton, Swansboro; John H. Bunn, Morehead City; L. C. Chandler, Davis; W. B. 
Cone, Maysville; William H. Covert, Pollocksville; Mr. and Mrs. M. Leslie Davis, 
Beaufort; Thomas W. Fryer, New Bern; H. B. Hines, Oriental; Rev. and Mrs. C. W. 
Kreamer, Dover; Mrs. N. L. McLawhon, New Bern. 

AVERY (2)— Vilas Minton, R. T. Teague, Newland. 

BEULAH (8) — J. N. Bowman, Roxboro; L. V. Coggins, Semora; J. F. Funderburk, Rox- 
boro; R. S. Graves, Yancey ville; W. B. Guthrie, Burlington; B. C. Lamb, Danville, 
Va.; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; Ralph O. Vernon, Blanch. 

BLADEN (7)— D. T. Britt, Clarkton; Jasper Cole, White Oak; Wilbur Edwards, Lumber- 
ton; R. J. Hall, Bladenboro; Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Smith, White Oak; L. L. Todd, 
Bladenboro. 

BLUE RIDGE (16)— W. E. Abrams, Marion; Jeta P. Baker, East Marion; Paul T. 
Brock, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Chambers, R. I. Corbett, M. W. Gordon, Jr., W. F. 
Grant, A. H. Mitchell, M. O. Owens, Jr., C. C. Parker, Marion; Rev. and Mrs. R. L. 
Smith, D. C. Wesson, Old Fort; Rev. and Mrs. W. Gordon Wilson, Marion. 

BRIER CREEK (CD- 
BRUNSWICK (1)— A. L. Brown, Southport. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (3)— Dr. and Mrs. David E. Browning, North Wilkesboro; How- 
ard J. Ford, Wilkesboro. 

BUNCOMBE (37)— H. W. Baucom, St., Black Mountain; Clay R. Barnes, Asheville; 
B. C. Blankenship, Swannanoa; C. R. Browning, Jr., A. J. Buckner, Mrs. C. M. Car- 
ter, Rev. and Mrs. G. Carlton Cox, Rev. and Mrs. W. Perry Crouch, Asheville; Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry R. Gasperson, Black Mountain; J. P. Goodman, J. B. Grice, Ashe- 
ville; Ottis Hagler, Oteen; M. W. Hamrick, Asheville; William L. Hatcher, Ridgecrest; 
Rev. and Mrs. F. W. Haynie, Asheville; Ralph R. Hensley, Candler; H. M. Hocutt, 
Biltmore; Mary Humphrey, Asheville; Morgan A. Kizer, Weaverville; Mrs. W. W. 
Lawton, Sr., Ridgecrest; H. R. Logan, Mrs. Harry Lominac, Asheville; Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest; Johnnie Tiller, J. R. Owen, J. C. Pipes, George A. Roberts, 
Rev. and Mrs. C. F. Rogers, A. P. Sprinkle, Nane Starnes, Asheville; Tom E. Wal- 
ters, Ridgecrest. 

BURNT SWAMP (5)— L. W. Jacobs, Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Locklear, Roy W. Maynor, 
P. A. Underwood, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (59)— G. Fred Agee, Mrs. L. E. Barnhardt, Mrs. J. C. Baucom, W. L. Bost, 
H. L. Bray, J. V. Buff, Nancy Callaway, John H. Connell, J. T. Dabbs, Concord; 
B. A. Davis, Kannapolis; J. T. Davis, T. B. Deese, Concord; Mrs. M. L. Dorton, 
Landis; Bessie Funderburk, W. T. Furr, R. F. Gardner, Kannapolis; H. F. Goodwin, 
Concord; Herbert A. Greene, J. C. Gwaltney, Kannapolis; J. S. Harris, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher L. Hartsell, A. A. Hathcock, Rev. and Mrs. Grady J. Haynes, J. A. Heilig, 
N. J. Helms, C. E. Herrin, Concord; H. B. Hiatt, Kannapolis; J. H. Hill, Salisbury; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Honeycutt, Kannapolis; Dwight H. Ives, Concord; R. C. James, 
Rev. and Mrs. W. Walter Jones, Kannapolis; H. G. Liner, Concord; W. M. McGinnis, 
Kannapolis; R. P. Merritt, Mary Etta Morgan, W. W. Perry, Concord; Crawford W. 
Poplin, B. E. Porter, P. L. Queen, E. C. Roach, Elizabeth Rodgers, Mrs. Lucy Rod- 
well, Kannapolis; Mrs. Allison S. Rogers, Z. W. Rotan, W. B. Shropshire, Concord; 
L. W. Simmons, Kannapolis; Mr. and Mrs. J. U. Stallings, E. S. Summers, W. V. 
Tarlton, Concord; J. S. Tyson, Kannapolis; F. M. Weast, Mrs. M. L. Upright, Con- 
cord; W. P. Yates, Kannapolis. 

CALDWELL (31)— Mrs. D. D. Annas, Rhodhiss; H. S. Benfield, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. 
J. G. Benfield, Ethel Boyle, Granite Falls; H. G. Bryant, Whitnel; Mrs. C. N. Buell, 



Annual of Session 1944 57 

Elizabeth Campbell, Zeb Caudle, Lenoir; Charles F. Cook, Hudson; James G. Cozart, 
Rhodhiss; Eller Dickson, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. P. D. Fletcher, Granite Falls; Paul 
Hester, Hudson; G. W. Hollar, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Kerley, Granite Falls; E. C. 
McCall, Mrs. J. W. McCall, Lenoir; Mrs. M. A. Mackie, Granite Falls; Dr. and Mrs. 
O. R. Mangum, Lenoir; R. B. Miller, Hudson; W. R. Moss, Lenoir; T. E. Payne, 
Hudson; L. B. Robinson, Edith Steele, Ruby Steele, Lenoir; S. A. Stroup, S. M. 
Stroup, Granite Falls. 

CAROLINA (15)— M. F. Arledge, Saluda; W. H. Davis, Lawrence A. Erwin, Hender- 
sonville; B. G. Henry, Tryon; N. A. Melton, Columbus; Dr. and Mrs. J. C. Owen, 
Saluda; Otto Parham, Balfour; George T. Pennell, Hendersonville; H. B. Phillips, For- 
est City; A. V. Reese, O. M. Seigler, J. N. Shuford, Thomas E. Thompson, Hender- 
sonville; E. M. Walker, Tuxedo. 

CATAWBA RIVER (21)— Plennie Berry, Valdese; Phronsie Bizzell, Rev. and Mrs. F. A. 
Bower, J. L. Bragg, Morganton; Rev. and Mrs. John P. Crouch, Valdese; E. M. Hair- 
field, Elbert F. Hardin, Helen E. Harris, Carl Hemphill, Mrs. R. O. Huffman, Mrs. 
J. B. Jones, R. F. Mayberry, Mrs. W. H. Reddish, Rev. and Mrs. W. B. Sprinkle, 
J. O. Summerlin, C. R. Upton, Morganton; R. H. Weaver, Valdese; Mrs. F. H. 
Wyatt, Morganton. 

CHEROKEE (4) — Jarrett B. Blythe, Cherokee; Ben Bushyhead, Whittier; J. Jeter John- 
son, William Welch, Cherokee. 

CHOWAN (14)— W. C. Blue, Manteo; D. P. Brooks, Elizabeth City; Rev. and Mrs. J. 
T. Byrum, Tyner; Rev. and Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins, Hertford; Mrs. J. R. Everett, 
Elizabeth City; Rev. and Mrs. G. A. Martin, Roanoke Island; E H. Potts, W. R. 
Stephens, Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City; Charles B. Williams, Shiloh; Roscoe Wynn, 
Elizabeth City. 

COLUMBUS (20)— J. W. Butler, Whiteville; Winfrey Davis, Tabor City; B. G. Early, 
Cerro Gordo; Rev. and Mrs. J. F. Gaddy, Whiteville; Elbert N. Johnson, Fair Bluff; 
S. N. Lamb, I. T. Newton, Whiteville; A. T. Peacock, Evergreen; Narine Peterson, 
Delco; R. J. Rasberry, Hallsboro; Joseph Stanley, Mrs. Vance Thompson, Whiteville; 
E. Evans Ulrich, Lake Waccamaw; Mrs. Arthur W. Williams, Herman Williams, Irvin 
Williams, Mrs. J. Carl Williamson, Whiteville; H. B. Wyche, J. B. Wyche, Hallsboro. 

EASTERN (14)— J. V. Case, Jr., Rose Hill; T. N. Cooper, Calypso; Mack Herring, Mt. 
Olive; C. H. Hornsby, Clinton; L. L. Johnson, Magnolia; John W. Lambert, Mount Olive; 
Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Marshburn, Salemburg; Mrs. W. P. Martin, Mount Olive; Rev. 
and Mrs. J. C. Powell, G. Van Stephens, Warsaw; Edward A. Walker, Clinton; Mr. 
and Mrs. O. E. Wilson, Mount Olive. 

ELKIN (3) — Stephen Morrisett, J. L. Powers, Mrs. C. N. Myers, Elkin. 

FLAT RIVER (4)— M. L. Banister, Oxford; E. W. Greene, Henderson; W. D. Poe, 
Oxford; J. Marshall Walker, Stovall. 

FRENCH BROAD (11)— Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill; J. J. Buckner, Marshall; Walt N. 
Johnson, Salisbury; Wade Kelly, Marshall; M. H. Kendall, John A. McLeod, Dr. and 
Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill; Rev. and Mrs. E. V. Plemmons, Marshall; L. L. Vann, 
Mars Hill. 

GASTON COUNTY (82)— J. T. Allen, Cherryville; J. W. Auten, D. M. Ballard, Cram- 
erton; Rev. and Mrs. M. L. Barnes, W. Ward Barr, Rev. and Mrs. O. H. Bolch, 
L. E. Bookhout, Billy Page Brafford, Clyde Brafford, Gastonia; Naomi Braswell, Cram- 
erton; Mrs. R. U. Brooks, Lowell; Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Bryson, East Gastonia; D. W. 
Bumgardner, Belmont; E. J. Caldwell, North Belmont; Rev. and Mrs. T. L. Cashwell, 
N. C. Carter, Gastonia; A. E. Clemmons, Lowell; Rev. and Mrs. L. S. Clark, Mrs. 
Marvin Clark, Mount Holly; R. R. Cook, Cramerton; Mrs. I. E. Craig, Stanley; Rev. 
and Mrs. E. S. Elliott, Cherryville; Mrs. W. J. Francis, Belmont; C. V. Garner, East 
Gastonia; W. Luther Hawkins, Cherryville; Rev. and Mrs. P. A. Hicks, Belmont; Dr. 
and Mrs. W. F. Hinesley, Gastonia; W. Arthur Hoffman, West Gastonia; Roy H. 
Hovis, Belmont; E. V. Hudson, Cramerton; John W. Hughston, Jr., Belmont; Mrs. 
J. A. Hunsucker, McAdenville; Mrs. Katie L. Jenkins, Gastonia; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Johnson, Mount Holly; A. W. Kincaid, Bessemer City; Mrs. William L. Lanier, Bel- 
mont; Rev. and Mrs. F. H. Leatherwood, Mount Holly; A. V. Ledford, Gastonia; R. H. 
Lineberger, Stanley; Mrs. R. L. Lofin, Mount Holly; E. T. Mauney, Stanley; Mrs. 
Carrie Montgomery, Mount Holly; Esther Moon, Cherryville; Mrs. Paul Moss, East 



58 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Gastonia; Ola M. Moton, Belmont; Floyd J. Noblett, Bessemer City; R. R. Payseur, 
C. E. Phillips, Gastonia; Mrs. George Rankin, McAdenville; H. H. Roberts, Lowell; 
H. S. Rotan, Cramerton; Bessie Rumfelt, McAdenville; Mrs. M. T. Saunders, Bessemer 
City; Mrs. W. H. Saunedrs, East Gastonia; Mrs. E. C. Sisk, Bessemer City; Rev. and 
Mrs. W. C. Sledge, Lowell; Rev. and Mrs. Ernest M. Smith, McAdenville; Howard 
Smith, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Snow, Stanley; M. W. Stallings, Lowell; A. C. 
Taylor, Stanley; J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer City; A. E. Teague, Gastonia; J. L. Vip- 
perman, Dallas; Mrs. B. G. Weathers, Stanley; Mrs. I. M. Wilson, Lowell; Mr. and 
Mrs. C. S. Withers, Gastonia; Doc Wilbanks, Hardin; Miss Lucy Williams, Bessemer 
City. 

GREEN RIVER (18)— L. P. Barnette, Union Mills; L. G. Blanton, Spindale; Mr. and 
Mrs. Homer E. Brady, Columbus; E. E. Davis, E. H. Freeman, Spindale; Z. Miller 
Freeman, Forest City; Mrs. E. B. Hill, Spindale; Rev. and Mrs. Irby B. Jackson, 
Rutherfordton; F. W. Jarvis, Spindale; Mrs. W. W. Nanney, Rutherfordton; James W. 
Ray, Spindale; B. P. Scruggs, Rutherfordton; Mrs. E. L. Simmons, D. M. Sinclair, 
Spindale; J. J. Tarlton, Rutherfordton; W. R. Wells, Spindale. 

HAYWOOD (17)— Dr. and Mrs. B. A. Bowers, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Clark, Canton; 
L. G. Elliott, Waynesville; Mrs. Fred Fore, P. H. Greene, Canton; S. Madge Lewis, 
Waynesville; J. Doyle Miller, Canton; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville; Mrs. W. B. Norris, 
Ellie O'Diear, Canton; T. H. Parris, Clyde; Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Patrick, Waynesville; 
George C. Rhinehart, Canton; Manuel C. Wyatt, Waynesville. 

JOHNSTON (32)— E. Y. Averett, Benson; Edith Averette, Raleigh; J. Wade Baker, 
Selma; O. E. Bearfoot, Benson; Rev. and Mrs. W. S. Caudle, Raleigh; J. D. Creech, 
Smithfield; Mrs. W. P. Creech, Clayton; Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Davis, Four Oaks; 
R. E. Earp, Selma; Cline D. Ellis, Smithfield; Tom M. Freeman, Selma; C. L. Gil- 
lespie, H. M. Hall, Benson; Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, Clayton; Nina Johnson, Raleigh; 
Bolton Jones, Smithfield; Mrs. Jim Lane, Raleigh; Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Langston, Clay- 
ton; J. Willie Lee, Willow Springs; C. L. Massey, Smithfield; H. E. Mitchiner, Wil- 
son's Mills; Mrs. L. C. Poole, Raleigh; Grace Smith, Clayton; Wesley Sorrell, Raleigh; 
Mrs. E. M. Stott, Garner; Hugh L T pchurch, Wilson's Mills; Rosaline Walker, Garner; 
Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton; Adam J. Whitley, Jr., Smithfield. 

KINGS MOUNTAINS (58)— W. L. Allen, Boiling Springs; B. F. Austin, Kings Moun- 
tain; W. A. Ayers, W. P. Biggerstaff, Jesse Blalock, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. C. B. 
Bobbitt, G. A. Bridges, Kings Mountain; J. A. Brock, Shelby; Mr. and Mrs. Delbert 
Byars, Kings Mountain; D. Boyd Cannon, Shelby; J. R. Cantrell, Boiling Springs; 
J. W. Costner, Lawndale; C. C. Crow, Mrs. T. L. Dedmon, Horace Easom, Henry B. 
Edwards, Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Elam, Shelby; P. L. Elliott, Boiling Springs; T. W. 
Fogleman, Grover; Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Gold, Kings Mountain; Mr. and Mrs. F. E. 
Greene, Mrs. Belle H. Grigg, C. Rush Hamrick, Shelby; Hugh F. Harrill, Moores- 
boro; G. V. Hawkins, Mrs. D. L. Houser, Shelby; Blanche Hoyle, Lawndale; W. H. 
Jackson, Shelby; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs; Byron Keeter, Kings Mountain; A. M. 
Kiser, Waco; Mrs. L. H. Ledford, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Ledford, C. A. Morrison, O. 
M. Mull, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. L. C. Pinnix, Kings Mountain; D. F. Putnam, 
Shelby; Earl M. Redding, Gastonia; J. R. Roberts, Kings Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Roberts, J. Worth Silver, Mrs. Rush Stroup, J. W. Suttle, Shelby; J. L. 
Teague, Kings Mountain; D. A. Tedder, H. E. Waldrop, Zeno Wall, Lee B. Weath- 
ers, Shelby; W. A. Williams, Joe Lee Woodward, Kings Mountain. 

LIBERTY (57)— Rev. and Mrs. C. B. Atkinson, Erlanger; Mrs. Beamer H. Barnes, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. R. Blair, Thomasville; Rev. and Mrs. J. Roy Clifford, Mrs. Irving Cooper, 
Lexington; Mrs. Ben Cox, J. A. Cox, Thomasville; Mr. and Mrs. Carey J. Davis, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. P. Davis, Kernersville; J. W. Dickens, Lexington; C. C. Edinger, South- 
mont; Thomas B. Flowe, Thomasville; Mrs. Z. V. Fulbright, Lexington; Dr. and Mrs. 
I. G. Greer, Thomasville; Mrs. B. L. Hames, Erlanger; Catherine Hilliard, F. G. John- 
son, H. V. Kinney, Lexington; R. L. Kizer, Thomasville; W. H. Lomax, Linwood; 
Dr. and Mrs. W. K. McGee, Thomasville; Mrs. A. G. McCormick, Winston-Salem; 
Sallie L. McCracken, J. A. McMillan, Thomasville; G. W. Miller, Lexington; Rev. 
and Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, Kernersville; G. E. Morefield, Salisbury; Rev. and Mrs. J. 
A. Neilson, Thomasville; Mrs. J. B. Powell, Erlanger; Rev. and Mrs. V. W. Sears, 
Thomasville; Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, Lexington; Mr. and Mrs. Romulus Skaggs, 
Thomasville; Mrs. Daisy Spurgeon, High Point; H. M. Stroup, Denton; Mr. and Mrs. 



Annual of Session 1944 59 

C. V. Talbert, Salisbury; N. C. Teague, Lexington; Mrs. W. E. Tomlinson, Thomas- 
ville; Mrs. J. W. Turtle, Wallburg; Mr. and Mrs. Carroll C. Wall, R. C. Wall, Lex- 
ington; Mrs. J. L. Ward, Jr., Thomasville; Rev. and Mrs. Chas. S. Young, Lexington. 

LITTLE RIVER (34) — Rev. and Mrs. Laurie J. Atkinson, Lillington; Mattie Bain, H. M. 
Baker, Coats; Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Barefoot, Angier; L. P. Beck, Broadway; Mrs. 
Charles H. Brunk, Coats; J. C. Bullock, Lillington; Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek; 
L. L. Coats, Lilian Draughan, Coats; C. W. Flowers, Angier; Sam F. Hudson, Lilling- 
ton; E. C. Keller, Dunn; A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek; Rev. and Mrs. Forest Maxwell, 
Erwin; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; Mrs. Mamie L. Morgan, Angier; Eugene O'Quinn, 
Mary Lee Page, W. H. Parrish, Lillington; Alice Patterson, Lottie Patterson. Zula 
Rogers, Mamers; C. E. Ruffin, Broadway; J. A. Senter, Lillington; B. O. Slaughter, 
Dunn; W. M. Thomas, Swans Station; R. L. Whipple, Buie's Creek; J. E. Womble, 
Lillington; Rev. and Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier. 

MACON (3)— Thorn N. Carter, Highlands; Lysbeth Cox, J. F. Marcham, Franklin. 

MECKLENBURG (123)— Mrs. G. R. Abernethy, Mrs. J. F. Alexander, H. G. Ashcraft, 

C. R. Austin, Catherine W. Bates, Charlotte; W. C. Bearden, Paw Creek; C. L. Big- 
gerstaff, Mrs. Raymond Blanton, David E. Bobbitt, Charlotte; Mrs. A. M. Boyette, 
Matthews; Rev. and Mrs. S. K. Brazil, J. H. Bridges, Mrs. W. D. Briggs, Claude C. 
Broach, Charlotte; L. M. Broom, Paw Creek; A. S. Bumgardner, Guy T. Carswell, 
Mrs. W. L. Chapman, Mrs. J. W. Clamp, Mrs. S. M. Collier, J. M. Crowe, J. J. 
Cummet, Charlotte; J. E. M. Davenport, Pineville; Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Dawson, R. S. 
Dickson, J. W. Digh, Mrs. H. Y. Ditto, Charlotte; R. Love Dixon, Huntersville; Paul 
K. Drum, Cornelius; E. R. Echerd, Jr., Charlotte; N. B. Featherstone, Paw Creek; 

D. W. Fink, Mrs. Edith Fink, Charlotte; W. Justine Flowe, Concord; Mrs. W. B. 
Frink, Matthews; Harry H. Gardner, Louisville, Ky. ; S. Q. Garrison, Mrs. E. B. 
Gentry, Mrs. J. C. Goodman, Frank Grigg, J. P. Hackney, E. W. Haight, Fred W. 
Hartsell, George D. Heaton, James E. Hill, George L. Hocutt, Mrs. B. L. Hocutt, 
Mrs. J. T. Holder, W. R. Hopkins, Mrs. W. Vance Howard, G. D. Hoyle, Charlotte; 
Mrs. W. F. Jackson, Pineville; Mr. and Mrs. W. M. James, Charlotte; J. Clarence 
Jones, Newell; Mrs. Mary Keeter, Charlotte; E. E. Kerley, Huntersville; H. C. Kessiah, 
John R. Knott, Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Lawton, Jr., Mrs. F. D. Lethco, Mrs. W. C. 
Link, Luther Little, Charlotte; Mrs. H. F. McMann, Matthews; Mrs. C. C. Martin, 
C. L. Mason, Charlotte; Herman G. Matheney, Huntersville; J. L. Mauney, Pineville; 
J. M. Medlin, Mrs. R. E. Mingus, Charlotte; R. D. Mooney, Davidson; Alma E. 
Moose, J. D. Moose, Mrs. J. E. Morris, Guy M. Moser, Mrs. John P. Motsinger, 
Charlotte; H. S. Mumford, Matthews; Mrs. E. W. Myers, Charlotte; A. W. Payseur, 
Hawk Creek; C. N. Peeler, Mrs. W. J. Phifer, Mrs. B. U. Pigg, C. W. Propst, L. R. 
Pruette, W. A. Pruett, Mrs. T. F. Ramseur, Fred C. Roberts, Charlotte; T. C. Robert- 
son, Pineville; P. C. Rodwell, Mrs. W. L. Ruff, Mrs. W. E. Ruppelt, E. V. Sapp, 
J. D. Sapp, Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Sargeant, J. M. Scarborough, J. T. Sisk, Mrs. H. M. 
Short, E. L. Spivey, John S. Staton, Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Stephenson, Mrs. G. G. 
Stockbridge, Mrs. C. H. Stockton, J. H. Strickland, L. D. Taylor, Mrs. A. R. Threatt, 
Charlotte; J. P. Thomas, Huntersville; Mrs. Cleave Thompson, Mrs. W. W. Turner, 
Preston S. Vann, Woodrow Wall, C. C. Warren, O. F. Watts, Mrs. J. N. White, Mrs. 
I. W. Williams, William Harrison Williams, A. B. Wood, J. Clyde Yates. 

MITCHELL (3)— W. T. Baucom, Spruce Pine; R. D. Campbell, Bakersville; Roy D. 
Keller, Spruce Pine. 

MONTGOMERY (12)— Mrs. G. C. Dixon, Mount Gilead; L. S. Edwards, Mrs. W. T. 
Ferrell, Troy; Frances Haywood, Mount Gilead; W. D. Haywood, Candor; Theo Mc- 
Queen, Troy; Mrs. H. A. Nanney, Rev. and Mrs. Charles E. Stevens, Mount Gilead; 
Rev. and Mrs. Charles B. Trammel, Miss Margaret Wright, Troy. 

MOUNT ZION (84)— Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Abernethy, Hillsboro; W. C. Adkinson, 
Swepsonville; Rev. and Mrs. Henry B. Anderson, Durham; Mrs. R. H. Andrews, 
Burlington; Ernest W. Bailes, Durham; Dr. and Mrs. Das Kelley Barnett, Chapel 
Hill; Mrs. H. S. Boyce, Durham; H. S. Branch, Saxapahaw; C. E. Byrd, Durham; 
Guy S. Cain, Graham; N. A. Catlett, Cary; Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Cheek, Trela D. Col- 
lins, C. T. Council, Durham; Emma Cox, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Cox, Graham; Florence 
Crutchfield, John Edwards, W. W. Edwards, Mrs. C. D. Faucette, Mrs. H. L. Fergu- 
son, Ella Sue Gravitte, Rev. and Mrs. H. G. Hammett, Mrs. C. L. Hayward, F. D. 
Hemphill, Durham; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex; Owen F. Herring, Robert D. Holle- 



60 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

man, Durham; A. C. Howell, Chapel Hill; J. M. Johnson, Dr. and Mrs. J. Samuel 
Johnson; Mrs. T. Neil Johnson, Chapel Hill; Rev. and Mrs. Charles Jollay, Mrs. G. 
N. W. Jones, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. A. D. Kinnett, Burlington; John H. Knight, 
Mebane; J. H. Lackey, Alamance; Mrs. Beverly Lake, Frank H. Marshall, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. J. Moody, Rev. and Mrs. B. E. Morris, Durham; Luther A. Nail, Burling- 
ton; Rev. and Mrs. J. Winston Pearce, Dr. and Mrs. D. R. Perry, Durham; D. C. 
Phillips, Mrs. Guy Phillips, Chapel Hill; Mrs. J. R. Poindexter, Burlington; William 
H. Poole, Carrboro; J. H. Rice, Chapel Hill; Alice Rowe, C. N. Royal, Durham; 
Mrs. Tom Simmons, Graham; Charles C. Smith, Durham; M. D. Smith, Haw River; 
C. H. Stanfield, Burlington; W. E. Stanley, Durham; A. P. Stephens, Lula Mae 
Teague, Burlington; Z. O. Teel, Mildred Thomas, Mrs. O. G. Tillman, Durham; Mrs. 
J. H. Vernon, Burlington; Mr. and Mrs. Basil M. Watkins, Durham; Mrs. W. M. 
Watts, Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Waugh, Jr., Burlington; Howard L. Weeks, Chapel Hill; 
A. P. Williams, Graham; Mrs. R. B. Wilkins, Durham; E. D. Young, West Hillsboro. 
NEUSE (13)— A. B. Alderman, W. R. Bunn, Rev. and Mrs. B. L. Davis, Snow Hill; 
Worth C. Grant, Mrs. J. E. Hart, Kinston; J. C. Hough, Goldsboro; T. C. Johnson, 
Lucile Reed, Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Reed, Kinston; Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, 
Goldsboro. 
NEW FOUND (CD- 
NEW SOUTH RIVER (30)— G. N. Ashley, Salemburg; Judge and Mrs. J. Abner Barker, 
Roseboro; Mrs. W. M. Beckwith, Fayetteville; J. F. Blackman, Buie's Creek; Mrs. 
George P. Brevard, Mrs. E. M. Brooks, Jr., M. W. Chapman, William B. Corbett, 
Waldo D. Early, Mrs. Jessica C. Frommelt, Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville; J. M. Gibbs, 
Stedman; T. D. Hatcher, Fayetteville; Ethel Herring, Roseboro; A. P. Howard, Salem- 
burg; C. R. Johnson, Fayetteville; Horace E. Jones, Dunn; Rev. and Mrs. W. J. Jones, 
Salemburg; H. P. Naylor, Roseboro; Thadius Naylor, Clinton; John A. Oates, Fay- 
etteville; Delia Poe, Roseboro; C. Parker Poole, E. N. Teague, C. H. Trueblood, 
Fayetteville; J. H. Warren, Clinton; T. H. Williams, Raleigh; C. W. Myrick, Fayette- 
ville. 
PEE DEE (48)— Mrs. Vera T. Allen, Bruce Benton, Rockingham; Mrs. L. E. Benton, 
Laurinurg; Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Carroll, Hamlet; Mrs. T. L. Caudle, B. M. Coving- 
ton, Wadesboro; W. H. Covington, Rockingham; Mrs. J. M. Davis, Wadesboro; Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles B. Deane, C. O. Funderburk, Rockingham; "J. J. Gray, E. B. Gun- 
ter, Hamlet; Mrs. R. L. Hardison, Wadesboro; Mr. and Mrs. J.. W. Hollis, Laurinburg; 
James D. Jones, Wadesboro; Mrs. G. H. Kelly, Rockingham; Eugene Knight, Morven; 
Mrs. F. M. Little, Mrs. H. W. Little, Mrs. Ruth A. Lyon, Wadesboro; Rev. and Mrs. 
O. W. McManus, Gibson; Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Matthews, Laurinburg; J. C. Meigs, 
Pageland, S. C. ; Donald G. Myers, Wadesboro; Mrs. Florence Pope, Rev. and Mrs. 
Edwin F. Perry Rockingham; John Racliffe, Jr., Wadesboro; R. D. Riggins, J. Marvin 
Smith, Rockingham; G. A. Stafford, Hamlet; Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Tadlock, Rockingham; 
H. P. Taylor, Wadesboro; C. H. Teague, Hamlet; J. R. Thomas, Rockingham; Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe W. Thompson, Hamlet; Dr. and Mrs. James B. Turner, Laurinburg; Rev. 
and Mrs. J. B. Willis, Miriam Willis, Hamlet. 
PIEDMONT (58)— J. M. Allred. Pomona; Neil J. Armstrong, Greensboro; Mrs. Grace 
Andrews, High Point; Henry H. Blanchard, L. Grady Burgiss, Greensboro; Mrs. W. 
F. Clayton, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. D. M. Clemmons, Elaine Clemmons, Reidsville; 
J. B. Clifton, C. G. Coe, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. O. P. Dix, High Point; J. 
Huber Dixon, Pleasant Garden; A. H. Dunning, Laura Durant, Greensboro; C. M. 
Floyd, High Point; Arthur S. Gillespie, Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Gillespie, 
Reidsville; Mrs. C. S. Grayson, High Point; Mrs. H. I. Grimes, Ray W. Harrington, 
Greensboro; Julian S. Hopkins, W. Wilbur Hutchins, High Point; Philip Hutchinson, 
Greensboro; R. P. Jackson, High Point; Wade H. James, Fred Koerber, Greensboro; 
A. L. McGee, High Point; John McGinnis, Reidsville; Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Martin, 
Greensboro; Hughey O. Miller, High Point; C. M. Oates, Pomona; D. W. Overby, 
Reidsville; Thelma Patrick, High Point; Mrs. J. I. Phillips, Greensboro; L. J. Rainey, 
High Point; S. L. Riddle, Greensboro; C. C. Roberts, Thomasville; T. L. Sasser, 
Greensboro; Mrs. C. E. Siceloff, C. M. Scott, Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Smith, High 
Point; Mabel Starnes, Greensboro; Hubert M. Stokes, High Point; Mrs. O. B. Teague, 
James R. Thompson, Mrs. Charles Tucker, Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Charles H. 
Walker, Greensboro; George H. Wallace, High Point; Milton Warf, Reidsville; James 
E. Wiggs, Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 



Annual of Session 1944 61 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (71)— Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Adams, King J. Brown, Irving E. Car- 
lyle, Mrs. Floyd Carter, Rev. and Mrs. Avery M. Church, L. Vernon Connell, Paul 
E. Crandall, J. A. Crews, J. J. Currin, Mrs. J. Neal Davis, Winston-Salem; J. P. Davis, 
Leaksville; Mrs. C. W. Dover, Winston-Salem; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. East, Spray; 
Davie Belle Eaton, Winston-Salem; Robert C. Foster, Leaksville; Mrs. J. B. "Futrell, 
J. F. Gant, Winston-Salem; Clyde W. Glosson, Kernersville; W. R. Grigg, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. B. Gresham, Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem; L. C. Hall, Mayodan; Rev. 
and Mrs. James M. Hayes, Mrs. J. E. Hedrick, Mrs. B. T. Henderson, Ralph A. 
Herring, Ronald D. Hicks, J. T. Joyner, Jr., Mrs. J. Lee Keiger, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. T. B. Knight, Madison; J. E. Kirk, Lewisville; Tom S. Lawrence, J. S. Lynch, 
M. E. Manuel, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Mary Meadows, King; V. R. Meadows, Pilot 
Mountain; H. Grady Miller, Winston-Salem; Raymond E. Moore, Rural Hall; Rev. and 
Mrs. W. H. Moore, Winston-Salem; Irene Money, Mayodan; Ora Motsinger, Marshall 
L. Mott, Winston-Salem; E. T. Parham, Madison; C. E. Parker, Mrs. J. A. Roddick, 
Mrs. J. J. Roddick, K. E. Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. John H. Scoff, Mrs. Oscar E. Shouse, 
Mrs. Ida Sink, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Slade, W. E. Southern, Rev. and Mrs. Chas. H. 
Stevens, Winston-Salem; M. C. Swicegood, Clemmons; James E. Swinson, Hanes; 
Burley S. Turner, Winston-Salem; Dr. and Mrs. C. V. Tyner, Leaksville; Mrs. Paul 
Wilson, Winston-Salem; Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Wilson, Rural Hall; Mrs. Geo. C. Yar- 
brough, Winston-Salem. 

RALEIGH (87)— Kathryn Abee, Raleigh; O. L. Beddingfield, Cary; Randolph Benton, 
Wake Forest; T. W. Brewer, Raleigh; S. W. Brewer, Wake Forest; Margaret Bright, 
New Hill; Mrs. B. L. Brown, J. J. Buffaloe, Raleigh; A. G. Bullard, Cary; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Bunn, Dr. and Mrs. Carlyle Campbell, W. C. Card, L. L. Carpenter, 
Raleigh; J. G. Carroll, Wake Forest; J. C. Castlebury, Apex; Dr. and Mrs. Z. M. 
Caveness, H. E. Cherry, Rev. and Mrs. John L. Coley, Joe S. Correll, Mary Currin, 
Raleigh; J. Allen Easley, Wake Forest; Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Virginia M. Franks, 
L. E. M. Freeman, Claude F. Gaddy, Leah Godwin, Raleigh; C. O. Greene, Cary; Jane 
Greene, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. George J. Griffin, Zebulon; J. N. Hare, Apex; L. R. 
Harrill, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. Bruce V. Hartsell, Franklinton; R. L. Hughes, 
Youngsville; A. W. Ieard, Henderson; Don R. Jackson, Raleigh; C. J. Jackson, Wake 
Forest; Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh; I. O. Jones, Wake Forest; Mrs. Doris Joyner, 
Raleigh; Thurman Kitchin, Wake Forest; Albert S. Lamm, Bunn; E. L. Layfield, 
Raleigh; John R. Link, Apex; LeRoy Martin, W. D. Martin, W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; 
J. T. Maynard, Cary; J. L. Memory, Jr., Wake Forest; F. Orion Mixon, Law M. 
Mobley, L. L. Morgan, Mrs. Myra Motley, C. G. Mumford, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. 
J. Gray Murray, Cary; T. L. Newton, Raleigh; Eugene Olive, Wake Forest; L. Bun 
Olive, Raleigh; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs; George W. Paschal, Wake Forest; 
Louise Paschall, Clarence Poe, Raleigh; R. D. Poe, Apex; Mrs. W. I. Powell, R. H. 
Satterfield, Raleigh; Fon H. Scofield, Wake Forest; W. A. Seagraves, Holly Springs; 
B. A. Senter, Raleigh; Mrs. A. T. Seymour, Sr., Apex; Lee C. Sheppard, J. A. 
Sikes, Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Simms, Sr., I. L. Stell, Mrs. A. F. Taylor, S. F. Teague, 
Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh; George E. Upchurch, Jr., Apex; W. H. Weatherspoon, 
J. M. Wilburn, W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

RANDOLPH (12)— Mr. and Mrs. Waldo C. Cheek, Asheboro; W. H. Connor, Central 
Falls; P. C. Gantt, Ramseur; Anne R. Harris, R. E. Heath, G. H. King, Rev. and 
Mrs. H. K. Masteller, Asheboro; J. I. Memory, Randleman; G. F. Settlemyre, C. L. 
Smith, Central Falls. 

ROANOKE (52)— Mrs. Frank Armstrong, Sr., Nashville; Rev. and Mrs. Clyde E. Bau- 
com, Wilson; G. W. Bullard, Rocky Mount; Ross Cadle, Enfield; Rev. and Mrs. A. 
Hartwell Campbell, Greenville; E. C. Chamblee, Farmville; Rev. and Mrs. E. G. Cole, 
Winterville; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; Richard L. Collins, Wilson; G. N. Cowan, 
Rocky Mount; C. E. Crawford, Hobgood; Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Daniel, Wilson; 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Davis, Farmville; Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Finlator, Weldon; 
Ben C. Fisher, Nashville; A. Lincoln Fulk, Washington; W. F. Gentry, Nashville; 
W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck; Ethel Guest, Williamston; Mrs. M. C. Gulley, Nash- 
ville; Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Hardaway, Greenville; Ira S. Harrell, Fountain; Mrs. 
Herbert Harris, Ayden; J. P. Harris, Bethel; J. K. Henderson, Scotland Neck; Lelia 
Higgs, Greenville; L. D. Holt, Bethel; Robert Lee Humber, Greenville; M. M. John- 
son, Spring Hope; W. I. Johnson, Ayden; Robert Joyner, Farmville; J. W. Kincheloe, 
Rocky Mount; Gordon E. Lee, Farmville; H. C. Lowder, Rocky Mount; Mrs. Gilbert 



62 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Peel, Greenville; Lee A. Phillips, Plymouth; Charles J. Shields, Scotland Neck; John 
Sledge, Nashville; Mrs. Ola Tucker, Greenville; H. E. Walden, Jr., Rocky Mount; 

B. Marshall White-Hurst, Roanoke Rapids; J. D. Williams, Tarboro; Mrs. J. L. Win- 
stead, Greenville; L. M. Wooiweaver, Rocky Mount; Pearl York, Scotland Neck. 

ROBESON (31) — J. Glenn Blackburn, Lumberton; E. B. Booker, Fayetteville; Rev. and 
Mrs. T. Paul Deaton, Parkton; Mrs. Elizabeth Doares, Maxton; Dr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Durham, G. P. Hedgepeth, Lumberton ; E. L. Hedgepeth, Fairmont; R. A. Hedgepeth, 
Lumberton; Rev. and Mrs. Carey P. Herring, Fairmont; A. J. Holmes, Lumberton; 
Joel S. Johnson, Fairmont; Mr. and Mrs. Abner Knoles, Raeford; R. A. Mclntyre, 
Lumberton; Mrs. Bessie Nicholson, Maxton; Mamie Niven, Raeford; Mr. and Mrs. 
Rogert R. Pitman, Barnesville; Rev. and Mrs. S. A. Rhyne, Lumberton; Rev. and 
Mrs. W. Earl Robinson, St. Pauls; Mrs. Ivey H. Shankle, Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Whis- 
nant, Raeford; W. R. Tyner, Lowe; Rev. and Mrs. Forrest L. Young, Maxton. 

ROWAN (39) — Rev. and Mrs. Smoot Baker, Spencer; Mr. and Mrs. Joe H. Bland, Rev. 
and Mrs. Milton L. Braun, Salisbury; Tom W. Bray, Faith; A. B. Bumgarner, Kan- 
napolis; Glenn Choate, Salisbury; D. A. Clanton, Kannapolis; Arch C. Cree, H. T. 
Davis, Salisbury; T. A. Dennis, China Grove; Rev. and Mrs. D. W. Digh, Archie 
Ellis, Salisbury; J. C. Hill, China Grove; B. G. Hasty, Mrs. Gordon Hasty, D. L. 
Hendrix, Salisbury; Mrs. J. G. Hicks, Spencer; J. O. Holt, Salisbury; John G. Hicks, 
Spencer; R. N. Huneycutt, Salisbury; I. J. Hunter, A. L. Jarrell, J. L. Kirk, Rev. 
and Mrs. W. R. Kiser, Salisbury; W. A. Loudermilch, Spencer; D. H. Lowder, Coy 
R. Miller, C. R. Myers, C. A. Rhyne, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Trexler, Rev. and Mrs. 
W. H. Walton, W. D. Williamson, Salisbury. 

SANDY CREEK (24)— Rev. and Mrs. K. E. Bryant, Pittsboro;- E. W. Byerly, Bear 
Creek; Mrs. Colin Churchill, V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; Rev. and Mrs. Yancey C. 
Elliott, Sanford; Sam J. Erwin, Southern Pines; Alfred F. Gibson, Siler City; S. C. 
Glosson, Moncure; William H. Griffin, Pittsboro; E. M. Harris, Aberdeen; Victor R. 
Johnson, Pittsboro; Wilbur L. Mclver, Sanford; Mrs. E. C. Macey, West End; Roy 
A. Morris, Sanford; Carl Lee Ousley, Siler City; Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Rogers, Sr., 
Sanford; J. Fred Stimson, Southern Pines; Clyde P. Stinson, Goldston; Rev. and Mrs. 
H. F. Stegall, Jonesboro; Walter L. Warfford, Carthage. 

SANDY RUN (31)— Rev. and Mrs. M. D. Blanton, Forest City; Mrs. J. D. Brown, Cliff- 
side; Mrs. J. E. Cargill, F. E. Dabney, Henrietta; W. W. Davidson, Boiling Springs; 
Blanche DeBrule, Henrietta; Ardalene Gramlich, Forest City; Rev. and Mrs. R. M. 
Hagler, Caroleen; Mrs. C. P. Hamrick, Cliff side; Elijah Hamrick, Ellenboro; R. E. 
Hollifield, W. S. Huntley, Forest City; G. L. Jones, Ellenboro, Olin Kendrick, Forest 
City; Sanford L. Lamm, Avondale; Rev. and Mrs. J. L. McCluney, Henrietta; Mrs. 
Chas. McCurry, Cliff side; A. M. McKinney, Ellenboro; C. C. Matheny, Forest City; 
Rev. and Mrs. O. D. Moore, Cliff side; Joe Parsons, Spindale; R. A. Pate, Bostic; Rev. 
and Mrs. W. E. Pettit, Mrs. Teny Smart, Yates Smith, Forest City; C. W. Walker, 
Mooresboro. 

SOUTH FORK (59)— Rev. and Mrs. Morris Baker, Dr. and Mrs. W. G. Bandy, Lin- 
colton; Mrs. R. K. Benfield, Hickory; Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Burrus, Newton; J. A. 
Burris, Lincolnton; Robert Clark, Maiden; M. G. Cloer, Alexis; Mrs. G. P. Coulter. 
Newton; Mr. and Mrs. Hubert M. Craig, Lincolnton; Guthrie Colvard, M. S. Cropps, 
Hickory; J. E. Crump, Conover; Susie Danner, Catawba; Bertis Fair, Newton; T. C. 
Fowler, Conover; Mrs. L. P. Fraus, Hickory; Mrs. J. H. Gilley, Maiden; Mr. and 
Mrs. L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; Mrs. J. C. Heffner, Maiden; C. H. Henderson, Chas. C. 
Holland, Hickory; W. C. Laney, Brookford; Mrs. Mary L. Lawrence, Hickory; Rev. 
and Mrs. M. L. Lewis, Bruce B. Littleton, Lincolnton; R. G. Mace, Catawba; H. L. 
Phillips, Connelly Springs; J. Louis Price, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Pruitt, Hickory; 
Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Rhoads, Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Rimmer, Rev. and Mrs. Henry C. 
Rogers, Lincolnton; Wm. C. Sand, Maiden; Mrs. J. D. Sharpe, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Sharpe, Newton; R. C. Shearin, Hickory; Haskell L. Sides, Ernest Sisk, Lincolnton; 
Texie Sowers, Newton; Sarah P. Stephens, E. F. Sullivan, Mrs. Mary Wallace, Hick- 
ory; A. R. Waters, Catawba; Rev. and Mrs. W. F. Woodall, Maiden; Rev. and Mrs. 
O. S. Ulmer, Newton; W. D. Yelton, Hickory. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN (3)— John E. Carter, Icard; Seth Ivester, O. S. Long, Lawndale. 

SOUTH YADKIN (44) — Victor L. Andrews, Mocksville; Zeb D. Baker, Statesville; Mrs. 

C. E. Barger, Mooresville; Rev. and Mrs. H. W. Baucom, Jr., Statesville; A. F. 



Annual of Session 1944 63 

Blackburn, Troutman; W. B. Carr, Mr. and Mrs. Z. D. Christenbury, Mooresville; 

Glenn Craig, Statesville; Mrs. W. H. Dodd, Mocksville; Harry Y. Gamble, States- 

ville; Mrs. C. T. Germaine, Mrs. C. I. Gresham; Mrs. J. R. Hendon, Mooresville; 

TV M. Hendrix, Mocksville; J. C. R. Herndon, Mooresville; Rev. and Mrs. E. B. Hicks, 

Harmony; H. W. Hutchins, Mocksville; Claude Johnson, Conover; Mrs. J. C. Jones, 

Mooresville; Mrs. J. W. Jordan, C. E. Kerger, Mrs. W. D. Killian, Rev. and Mrs. R. 

Von King, Rev. and Mrs. H. Fletcher Lambert, Ruby Mayberry, Statesville; S. P. 

Orders, J. H. Penninger, Mooresville; Mrs. R. L. Poovey, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Rimmer, 

Statesville; G. L. Royster, Cooleemee; Jacob Stewart, Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. A. T. 

Stoudenmire, Cleveland; L. R. Tate, Betty Hunt Thomas, Watha Thomas, Statesville; 

E. W. Turner, Mocksville; W. L. Williams, Statesville. 
STANLY (32)— Mrs. C. H. Bowers, Norwood; W. J. Bradley, J. H. Burleyson, U. S. 

Burleyson, Albemarle; Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Carriker, Stanfield; Mrs. C. B. Casper, 

New London; Mrs. J. B. Copple, Albemarle; C. L. Davis, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. 

L. W. Fields, Norwood; J. D. Griffin, Locust; Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Hayes, Badin; Rev. 

and Mrs. C. R. Hinton, Albemarle; Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Honeycutt, Stanfield; W. A. 

Hough, Norwood; O. A. Honeycutt, Norwood; Mrs. B. B. Johnston, Badin; Mrs. E. S. 

Levy, J. H. Mauldin, Norwood; W. F. Mauney, Stanfield; E. L. Melton, Concord; 

Rev. and Mrs. L. D. Munn, Badin; D. J. Robinson, New London; John H. Simpson, 

Concord; Mrs. T. V. Staton, New London; C. L. Taylor, Dwight Wilhelm, Albemarle. 
STONE MOUNTAIN CO- 
STONY FORK (0)— 
SURRY (6)— Willa B. Marks, Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Otey, Rev. and Mrs. R. K. Redwine, 

Julia Swann, Mount Airy. 
TAR RIVER (13)— Mrs. J. T. Alderman, Henderson; J. Edward Allen, Warrenton; A. 

Paul Bagby, Louisburg; Daisie B. Bowers, Mrs. W. Ray Bowers, Littleton; R. E. 

Brickhouse, Warrenton; W. P. Childers, R. R. Campbell, Louisburg; E. N. Gardner, 

W. H. Kimball, Elizabeth Lassiter, Henderson; Rev. and Mrs. Albert E. Simms, 

Littleton. 
TENNESSEE RIVER (3)— W. Herbert Brown, O. G. Dellinger, Mrs. A. J. Franklin, 

Bryson City. 
THREE FORKS (4)— J. C. Canipe, Kathleen Frink,-Grady Hamby, Boone; Mrs. Don C. 

Perry, Sherwood. 
TRANSYLVANIA (6)— J. A. Anderson, Pisgah Forest; S. B. McCall, S.« F. McAuley, 

Rev. and Mrs. B. W. Thomason, Brevard; L. B. Vaughn, Slater, S. C. 
TUCKASEIGEE (9)— F. P. Blankenship, Dillsboro; B. S. Hensley, Sylva; Dr. and Mrs. 

H. T. Hunter, A. C. McCall, Cullowhee; Hugh Monteith, Sylva; H. P. Smith, Cullo- 

whee; C. M. Warren, Sylva; C. C. Welch, Glenville. 
UNION (36) — Jack T. Akin, Monroe; Mrs. Carlton Bivens; John A. Bivens, Wingate; 

Mrs. J. V. Brooks, Monroe; Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Burris, Carolyn Caldwell, Mrs. Joe 
Chaney, Wingate; I. A. Connell, Mrs. H. E. Copple, Monroe; Mrs. J. M. Edwards, 
Marshville; Mrs. J. Grady Faulk, Monroe; Henry Gamble, Waxhaw ; J. T. Garland, 
Mrs. J. Hurley Griffin, Marshville; Mr. and Mrs. Joel W. Griffin, Monroe; Joe Lee 
Helms, M. C. Helms, Indian Trail; A. F. Hendricks, Mrs. H. M. Lilly, W. C. Link, 
Jr., Wingate; Mrs. Eula Marsh, Marshville; Mrs. W. M. Perry, Rommie Pierce, Mrs. 
R. F. Price, Wingate; Mrs. C. L. Rollins, Marshville; M. L. Ross, Concord; W. C. 
Sanders, Monroe; Fred Sandusky, Mrs. Baron D. Smith, Wingate; Loyd W. Teague, 
Camp Sutton; Mrs. G. O. Tucker, Rev. and Mrs. J. N. Watson, Marshville; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Howard Williams, Munroe. 

WEST CHOWAN (IS)— Mrs. Hallie O. D. Baker, Ahoskie; Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Coun- 
cilman, Windsor; Rev. and Mrs. Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; Joseph B. Folds, Aulander; 
Rev. and Mrs. Fletcher Ford, Severn; J. L. Jones, Murfreesboro; Rev. and Mrs. John 
E. Lanier, Winton; Mrs. C. G. Maddrey, Ahoskie; Lonnie Sasser, Murfreesboro; E. R. 
Stewart, Windsor; Paul T. Worrell, Colerain. 

WEST- LIBERTY (0)— 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (2)— R. Lane Akins, Hayesville; L. P. Smith, Andrews. 

WILMINGTON (19)— C. E. Baker, Sankey L. Blanton, Earle L. Bradley, Wilmington; 

H. F. Brinson, Currie; J. Bryan Dosher, Kelly; Mrs. L. J. Jordan, Carolina Beach; 

T. H. King, Rev. and Mrs. G. Carl Lewis, Wilmington; Lewis E. Ludlum, Carolina 



64 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Beach; William A. Poole, Burgaw; Rev. and Mrs. Woodrow W. Robbins, Leland; Rev. 
and Mrs. David K. Shelton, Jacksonville; Rev. and Mrs. H. S. Strickland; J. O. Wal- 
ton, Wilmington; Thomas K. Woody, Jr., Atkinson. 

YADKIN (7)— W. T. Adams, J. G. Allgood, Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville; 
Mrs. J. W. Garner, Brooks X Roads; J. C. Ray, Boonville; George D. Renegar, 
Harmony. 

YANCEY (3) — E. G. Adkins, Ramsaytown; Laura Mae Hilliard, A. Z. Jamerson, 
Burnsville. 

Total Messengers: 1,585. 

VISITORS (242) — Mrs. R. E. Agnew, Charlotte; Mrs. Jack T. Akin, Monroe; Martha 
Ann Allen, Wake Forest; Mrs. J. G. Allgood, Yadkinville; Mrs. Wallace Aman, 
Carolina Beach; Mrs. Hugh G. Ashcraft, Mrs. H. S. Atwell, Mrs. Geo. S. Averett, 
James E. Baker, Lumberton; Barrie B. Barefoot, Angier; E. S. Barnes, Charlotte; 
Mrs. R. F. Beasley, Monroe; R. R. Beck, Salisbury; R. T. Boatwright, Conover; 
Mrs. David E. Bobbitt, Charlotte; Mrs. H. L. Bost, Hickory; Attie T. Bostick, Shelby; 
Mrs. R. H. Bowles, Hickory; Mrs. Basil Boyd, Charlotte; Paul T. Brock, Marion; 
Mrs. B. W. Broome, Wingate; Ray E. Brown, Winston-Salem; Mrs. R. B. Buie, 
Bladenboro; Mrs. A. S. Bumgardner, Charlotte; Mrs. Roscoe Bunn, Snow Hill; Mrs. 
Danford Burroughs, Charlotte; Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Byers, Troutman; Mrs. C. R. 
Caldwell, Charlotte; Harry Cardwell, Reidsville; Mrs. B. C. Carlton, Hickory; Mrs. 
W. O. Carr, Shelby; Hardy A. Corroll, Guilford College; P. H. Carter, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. A. D. Caudle, Albemarle; Marjorie Chapman, Charlotte; Adelaide Charles, Ral- 
eigh; Mrs. Ed Christenbury, Mooresville; Mrs. R. I. Corbett, Marion; Mrs. Glenn 
Craig, Statesville; Mrs. Paul Crandall, Winston-Salem; Anne Crapps, Mrs. M. S. Crapps, 
Hickory; Mrs. F. E. Dabney, Henrietta; R. T. Daniel, Fort Worth, Tex.; G. W. 
Davis, Biscoe; Mrs. H. T. Davis, Salisbury; J. Neal Davis, Winston-Salem; Shirley 
Davis, Kernersville; Jerry Deese, Mrs. J. M. Deese, Kannapolis; Mrs. W. D. Digh, 
Holly; Mr. and Mrs. Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh; Dr. Edith M. Gosnell, Fairmont; 
Spencer; W. H. Dodd, Mocksville; Lucy Echerd, Taylorsville; Hattie Edwards, Thom- 
asville; Mrs. E. M. Eggers, Winston-Salem; R. P. Ellington, Graham; Mrs. John 
Erwin, Salisbury; Rev. and Mrs. J. N. Evans, Jr., Wallace; W. J. Farthing, Valle 
Crucis; Mrs. Ralph Featherstone, Belmont; G. H. Ferguson, Raleigh; Mrs. T. W. 
Fogleman, Grover; Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Foster, Statesville; Mrs. J. H. Fowler, Kan- 
napolis; Rev. and Mrs. H. S. Fox, Charlotte; Mrs. J. H. Fulghum, Mocksville; Mrs. 
Cora Funderburk, Charlotte; James Gibbs, Stedman; Mrs. H. D. Gibson, Mount 
Mae Grimmer, Raleigh; Geo. W. Griffin, Washington, D. C. ; Mrs. Joel W. Griffin, 
Monroe; Mrs. R. H. Graham, Charlotte; Mrs. Mack Guthrie, Wilmington; L. L. 
Hackney, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. P. W. Hamlett, Morganton; Chesley Hammond, 
Fairmont; Mrs. C. L. Hamrick, Davidson; M. W. Hamrick, Asheville; Minnie May 
Hammond, Charlotte; Mrs. J. E. Hancock, Winston-Salem; Mrs. E. J. Harrell, New- 
ton; Mrs. J. W. Hartsfield, Charlotte; J. B. Hatcher, Gaffney, S. C. ; Mrs. A. B. 
Hayes, Charlotte; Mrs. L. L. Haynes, Kannapolis; H. A. Helms, Raleigh; Mrs. O. W. 
Herr, Charlotte; Mrs. Ralph Herring, Winston-Salem; Mrs. C. J. Hicks, Forest City; 
Mrs. J. H. Hicks, Greensboro; W. S. Hicks, Mrs. W. S. Hicks, Mooresboro; C. High- 
smith, Gastonia; Albert Hill, Edneyville; Mrs. R. W. Hill, Salisbury; Mrs. C. Y. 
Holden, Sr., Wake Forest; Thomas C. Holland, Mooresboro; Mrs. Robert D. Holleman, 
Durham; Mrs. Ella T. Holtzclaw, Danville, Ky. ; Mrs. Wilbur Honeycutt, Carolina 
Beach; Paul J. Hopkins, Mount Gilead; Mrs. M. S. Howard, Thomasville; Rev. and 
Mrs. R. T. Howerton, Jr., Raleigh; Mrs. G. D. Hoyle, Charlotte; Mrs. M. A. Hug- 
gins, Raleigh; Wilbur A. Huneycutt, Boca Raton, Fla. ; Mrs. R. W. Hutchins, Salis- 
bury; Mrs. J. C. Hutto, Lumberton; Mrs. Dwight H. Ives, Concord; W. F. Jackson, 
Pineville; Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Jackson, Raleigh; Gretchen Johnson, Sylva; Mrs. J. G. 
Johnson, Charlotte; J. B. Jones, Morganton; Ruth Keller, Raleigh; T. L. Kimbrough, 
Princeton, Ind. ; Mrs. A. W. Kincaid, Bessemer City; Mrs. Fred Koerber, Greensboro; 
W. L. Lanier, Belmont; Mrs. G. G. Lanter, Winston-Salem; Geo. W. Leeper, Parkton; 
Grady Lewis, Lincolnton; Mrs. J. E. Lewis, Charlotte; Mary Liles, Wadesboro; Mrs. 
R. H. Lineberger, Stanley; Mrs. T. V. Lineberger, Lincolnton; Mrs. W. C. Link, Jr., 
Wingate; Mrs. L. A. Loftin, Mount Holly; Mrs. Bettie I. Long, Lilesville; Mrs. R. E. 
Long, Stanley; W. A. McCall, Seattle, Wash.; I. Stuart McElroy, Richmond, Va.; 
H. M. McGinnis, Hamlet; Mrs. C. P. McMahan, Forest City; Mrs. J. B. Mackie, 
Granite Falls; Henri E. Marian, Wilmington; Mrs. Hugh R. Martin, Charlotte; Zeno 



Annual of Session 1944 65 

Martin, Raleigh; Mrs. W. A. Matthew's, Charlotte; Mrs. N. A. Melton, Columbus; 
Mrs. R. C. Menzies, Hickory; Mrs. C. A. Millsaps, Statesville; Mrs. Ira Montgomery, 
Kannapolis; Mrs. Raymond E. Moore, Rural Hall; R. P. Murray, Kannapolis; Mrs. S. I. 
Myers, Lenoir; Jack Newgent, Winston-Salem; Kathryn Oren, Monroe; J. M. Page, 
Raleigh; Mrs. J. F. Parker, Wake Forest; Mrs. Lee A. Phillips, Plymouth; Mr. and 
Mrs. H. W. Pickett, Durham; Maude Pope, Catawba; Mrs. C. W. Poplin, Kannapolis; 
Mrs. Anderson Price, Taylorsville; Mrs. Chas. R. Price, Charlotte; Floyd W. Propst, 
Concord; Mrs. J. L. Putnam, Sr., Lincolnton; Mr. and Mrs. Grady Queen, Spencer; 
Joyce Reep, Belmont; Ronald E. Rice, Burlington; Mrs. H. A. Ridenhour, Monroe; 
Mrs. R. D. Riggins, Rockingham; W. M. Rivenbark, Jr., Wallace; Joe F. Roach, 
Lewiston; Mrs. Robt. L. Robinson, Charlotte; W. D. Robinson, Gastonia; Mrs. M. B. 
Roebuck, Badin; Mrs. F. H. Sadler, Mount Holly; Mrs. E. V. Sapp, Charlotte; Mrs. 
F. G. Satterfield, Durham; Mrs. D. C. Scruggs, Charlotte; F. J. Seago, Lilesville; 
Mrs. G. R. Seaberry, Jr., Concord; Carl Sharpe, Newton; Mrs. J. F. Shuford, Salis- 
bury; Mrs. A. B. Simmons, Mrs. G. F. Sinclair, Mrs. W. D. Sloan, Charlotte; Mrs. 
A. G. Smith, Spencer; Edgar W. Smith, Charlotte; Harvey Smith, Kannapolis; Mrs. 
J. E. Smith, Salisbury; Mrs. L. A. Smith, Belmont; Sylvia Smith, Lexington; Mrs. S. I. 
Smith, Charlotte; Mrs. Lawson Snipes, Carolina Beach; Milton Snyder, Hickory; Mrs. 
Sam Southard, Lincolnton; Mrs. R. B. Staton, Monroe; Mrs. J. A. Steelman, Hickory; 
Carroll Stegall, Jonesboro; Mrs. G. D. Stegall, Wingate; Joel Stegall, Jonesboro; Mrs. 
H. M. Stroup, Denton; Mrs. C. W. Teague, Granite Falls; Mrs. J. M. Teague, Char- 
lotte; Elmer Thomas, Dyersburg, Tenn. ; W. M. Thomas, Broadway; E. J. Trueblood, 
Gaffney, S. C. ; Mrs. Laura Turnley, Washington, D. C. ; Mrs. E. W. Turner, Mocks- 
ville; Mrs. Ira B. Turner, Charlotte; Percy B. Upchurch, Raleigh; Mrs. C. R. Upton, 
Charlotte; Dorothy Vann, Raleigh; P. W. Walker, Kannapolis; Mrs. Woodrow Wall, 
Charlotte; Mrs. Zeno Wall, Shelby; Mrs. E. W. Walton, Hickory; Mrs. C. C. Warren, 
Mrs. Emma Warren, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Waters, Manchester; Mrs. R. B. 
Watkins, Mount Holly; Mrs. Jim Watts, Taylorsville; Ruth Anne Weathers, Stanley; 
Mrs. Mertie E. Webb, Charlotte; Mrs. C. C. Welch, Glenville; Mrs. David Wesson, 
Valdese; Mrs. Linwood Westbrook, Salemburg; Mrs. James White, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. I. W. Williams, Mrs. T. P. Williamson, Charlotte; J. E. Womble, Lillington; 
Nell Wright, Charlotte; H. A. Yarbrough, Charlotte; Sarah Yates, Charlotte; Mrs. W. 
D. Yelton, Hickory; Roy J. Young, Rural Hall. 
Total Messengers and Visitors: 1,827. 



REPORT OF 
THE GENERAL BOARD 



85. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

In presenting this report to the one hundred and fourteenth session of the 
Baptist State Convention, the General Board expresses its gratitude once again 
to God and our thanks to the Baptist people of the State. 

On the whole the Board believes it to be an excellent report, and it be- 
lieves that when the reports from the associations are tabulated a substantial 
increase in the number of baptisms will be apparent. With respect to income 
it is sufficient to say that it will be far greater than in any year we have had. 
Multiplied thousands of our church members are wearing the uniform of their 
country, and are in many lands beyond the seas. Others have been uprooted 
from their homes, and have moved into war areas. Mounting casualty lists 
have brought sadness to many homes and many churches. It has, therefore, 
been a year of lights and shadows, but with the lights dominating. 

Before listing those matters which have claimed the particular attention of 
the Board during the year we present a brief report of the meetings of the 
General Board which have occurred during the year, except of course those 
matters considered by the Board at its pre-convention meeting. 

86. 

I. REPORT OF GENERAL BOARD MEETINGS 

Actions of the General Board in its meeting January 17 and 18 follow: 

1. The Board was organized with the election of E. N. Gardner as Presi- 
dent, Clyde E. Baucom, Vice-President and C. B. Deane as Recording Secre- 
tary. Chairmen of the various committees were elected as follows : Clyde E. 
Baucom, Committee on Missions, Louis S. Gaines, Committee on Training 
Activities, Claude F. Gaddy, Committee on Education, and W. A. Ayers, Com- 
mittee on Benevolence. Louis S. Gaines and W. E. Stanley were named mem- 
bers of the Executive Committee to take the place of those whose terms had 
expired. 

2. The Convention, in its 1943 session, appointed a committee of which 
W. H. Weatherspoon was named chairman, to investigate the needs for and 
advisability of procuring a home for the General Secretary of the Convention. 
Following a discussion of the matter is was agreed that this committee should, 
upon the consent and recommendation of the Executive Committee, be clothed 
with sufficient power to make final disposition of the matter. 

3. The Board heard the report of the committee appointed to make a study 
of the rural churches. This committee, composed of Garland A. Hendricks, 
Fon H. Scofield and R. T. Stancil, made a report and presented four recom- 
mendations, which recommendations were adopted by the Board. They follow : 

1. That the General Board endorse and support the movement 
to establish associational libraries for ministers. 

2. That the General Board experiment this year in such asso- 
ciational projects as that being undertaken in the Pilot Mountain 
Association March 18-25, 1944. 

3. That the General Board name a standing Committee for the 
study of the rural churches, to be made up of five men ; that 



70 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

necessary funds be appropriated for materials, books, travel, etc., 
said sum not to exceed $1,000. 

4. That the General Secretary be instructed to inform the Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Home Mission Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention of plans for working with the rural churches, 
and that he invite the Home Mission Board to share in planning 
and financing the work. 

The committee was increased by the election of two other members, Olin 
T. Binkley and Tom M. Freeman. 

4. Appropriations for current support for the first six months of the year 
made to the colleges, upon the recommendation of the Committee on Educa- 
tion, as follows : 

Wake Forest $10,000 

Meredith 10,000 

Mars Hill 7,500 

Campbell 6,250 

Wingate 1,750 

The Committee on Education was empowered to set the appropriations for 
the last six months of the calendar year 1944. 

An appropriation in the amount of $600 was made to take care of the ex- 
penses, travel, et cetera, in connection with meetings of the Education Council. 

5. Authority was granted the Executive Committee to borrow an amount 
not to exceed $75,000 during the calendar year for the purpose of completing 
the housing-in of the Wake Forest chapel building and for State Mission 
Work. 

6. The Board agreed to cooperate with the Home Mission Board in the 
promotion of a program of City Missions, such cooperation to include the 
payment of not more than one-third of the salaries of the city missionaries 
employed in Durham and Greensboro, with the understanding that the same 
agreement would apply with reference to any future missionaries employed in 
other cities. (Later in the year, after a conference with representatives of 
the Home Board, it was found impracticable to work out the program with 
the Home Board except on a fifty-fifty basis. Later in the report a fuller 
statement of the working agreements with the Home Board will be given.; 

7. The Executive Committee was authorized to advise with the General 
Secretary to the end that proper notice be served upon the Baptist churches 
cooperating with the Convention that the General Board in the future will 
not look with favor upon making appropriations to help in rebuilding a church 
destroyed by fire if such church had negligently failed to provide fire insurance 
on the building so destroyed. 

8. The Executive Committee was empowered to advise and direct the 
Trustees of the Baptist State Convention, a corporation, to take, hold, acquire, 
and make conveyance of real estate owned by, or which may be acquired by 
said trustees. (This action was necessary in order that certain lots owned by 
the Convention in the Sunset Park area of Wilmington might be transferred 
and title taken to other lots in lieu thereof.) 



Annual of Session 1944 71 

9. Authority was given the Executive Committee to arrange for continu- 
ance of the North Carolina Baptist Radio Hour for the last three quarters of 
the year, or some part of that time, and that necessary funds be made available. 
Since the Convention in Winston- Salem failed to name a Radio Committee, 
the following committee was named by the Board : Carl M. Townsend, W. 
Wilbur Hutchins, Mrs. Glenn Lassiter, L. L. Carpenter all of Raleigh, W. 
Perry Crouch, Asheville, George D. Heaton, Charlotte and C. E. Parker, 
Winston-Salem. 

10. Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Benevolence it was 
voted that the Relief and Annuity Board be advised that funds held by the 
State Convention for relief would be paid to beneficiaries through the Relief 
and Annuity Board, and not directly by the State Convention. (This action 
was necessary in lieu of an action taken by the Convention, or Board, at some 
previous time, but which had been overlooked in distributing some funds to 
aged ministers, or widows, just before last Christmas time.) 

11. Concerning a reserve fund for State Missions, the following resolution 
was adopted: 

"Be It Resolved by the General Board of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina that out of the surplus existing in 
the State Mission fund as of December 31, 1943 there be deposited 
with the North Carolina Baptist Foundation the sum of Fifteen 
Thousand ($15,000.00) Dollars, same to be held in reserve until 
such time as it may be needed for the purposes of State Mission 
Work ; 

That the North Carolina Baptist Foundation be requested to 
invest this amount to the best advantage possible, paying to the 
treasurer of the Convention from time to time any and all in- 
terest earned ; 

That it be understood that the North Carolina Baptist Founda- 
tion shall refund to the General Board the total amount, or any 
part, or parts, of the total amount when and as the General Board 
may request after reasonable, notice shall have been given to the 
North Carolina Baptist Foundation." 

12. The resignation of M. O. Alexander as General Missionary of the 
Board was accepted and recorded in the minutes. A committee was appointed 
to prepare proper resolutions of appreciation, same to be recorded in the 
minutes of the Executive Committee. 

13. A special committee, appointed to study the salary schedule of employees 
and make recommendations, made the following report which was adopted by 
the Board : 

"That the remuneration for employees of the Convention who 
are married be considered in two divisions (1) base salary and 
(2) allowance for habitation. 

That the increase in salaries in all instances be held to within 
five to ten per cent increase — that is not to exceed ten per cent. 

That the working out of this arrangement be left with the 
Executive Committee." 



72 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

(At a subsequent meeting of the Executive Committee an allowance for a 
home for the full-time employees of the Board who are married was fixed at 
$600 a year. The salary schedule for all employees of the Board will appear 
in the auditor's statement in the minutes of the Convention.) 

14. The Board approved the division of the 60% of the Undesignated Co- 
operative Program for State causes as follows : 

State Missions 15% 

Hospital 5% 

Ministerial Education 1% 

Ministers' Retirement Fund 1% 

Education-Debt Service 24% 

Education-Current Support 14% 

Total 60% 

15. Important actions of the Executive Committee in the interim between 
meetings of the General Board in January and June are recorded as follows : 

(a) An appropriation of $1,000 was made to the Chapel Hill Church in 
order that the church building might be put in first-rate condition before the 
dedication of the building in the summer or fall. 

(b) Appropriations were made for purchase of lots for churches to be 
established in West Thomasville and McLeansville. 

(c) It was voted that the Pastors' Schools in 1944 be held at Mars Hill 
and at Gardner-Webb as in the previous year, but that the school usually held 
at Meredith be transferred to Wake Forest. 

(d) The resignation of W. Wilbur Hutchins as Secretary of the Training 
Union Division was accepted in order that he might accept the call to the 
pastorate of the First Church of High Point. The General Secretary was 
authorized to draw up suitable resolutions of appreciation of his services to 
the Convention, same to be recorded in the minutes of the Board. At the 
same meeting Harvey T. Gibson, at that time assistant professor of English 
at N. C. State College, was employed to succeed Mr. Hutchins at a salary of 
$2700 plus $600 allowance for rent, his services to begin on April 1. Also at 
that meeting Law Mobley, then a senior student at the Southern Baptist The- 
ological Seminary, was employed as Young People's Leader in the Training 
Union Division at a salary of $2400 and Miss Louise Paschal was elected 
Junior Leader at a salary of $1620. 

(e) The resignation of W. H. Moore was accepted in order that he might 
accept the pastorate of Beck's Church in the Pilot Mountain Association. 

(f) The following agreement concerning the City Missions program to be 
carried on jointly by the Home Mission Board and the General Board was 
approved : 

"On March 3, 1944 the following named brethren met in con- 
ference in the office of General Secretary M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, 
North Carolina : M. A. Huggins, S. F. Dowis, and Courts Red- 
ford of the Home Mission Board, T. L. Sasser, Superintendent 
of City Missions in the Piedmont Association, J. Clyde Turner, 
Chairman of the City Missions Committee in the Piedmont Asso- 



Annual of Session 1944 73 

ciation, B. E. Morris, Chairman of the City Missions Committee 
of Durham, North Carolina, and F. D. Hemphill, Superintendent 
of City Missions of Durham, N. C. 

"After a general conference and discussion the following terms 
of agreement were reached as a basis for cooperation between the 
Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention and the 
General Board of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
in the City Missions Program in North Carolina. 

"1. That the City Missions Program shall be directed by a 
local City Missions Committee appointed by 'the district associa- 
tion or the Baptist Council, and that this committee shall make 
reports to the district association or council. 

"2. That the Superintendent of City Missions shall be under 
the direction of the local City Missions Committee ; shall be em- 
ployed by the General Board of the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina and approved by the Home Mission Board of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, and that he shall make reports to 
both these bodies each month as well as to his City Missions 
Committee ; that the salary and the local expense account of the 
Superintendent shall be shared on a fifty-fifty basis between the 
General Board of North Carolina and the Home Mission Board. 

"3. That the City Missions Program shall remain a church- 
centered program, and this will necessitate the appointment of a 
Missions Committee in each local church ; and that the work of 
missions in the city shall be the work of the local church. There- 
fore, it will be the obligation of the City Missions Committee, 
and the superintendent, to enlist the churches in doing the local 
mission work. 

"4. It is to be kept in mind that this program shall be pri- 
marily one which is dependent upon voluntary workers from the 
local churches. 

"5. That the City Missions Program shall remain primarily a 
missionary program, and not become an educational or promotional 
work of the already established churches, but shall be for the 
extension of Kingdom work beyond the local church. 

"6. That each City Missions Program shall call upon the 
churches of its area to provide the necessary local operating 
budget." 

(g) Mrs. Gerald Motley, then a student at the W. M. U. Training School, 
was elected as assistant to Mr. Morgan in the Sunday School Division at a 
salary of $1620. 

(h) Secretary Huggins reported that the matter of the B. F. Huntley will, 
which had been passed on to the Executive Committee with power to act, was 
settled and that $10,105.54 had been received. It was voted that this amount 
be placed with the Baptist Foundation, the income to be used by the General 
Board in accordance with the terms of the will. 

The following actions were taken by the General Board, meeting in Wake 
Forest, on June 6 : 



74 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

1. Claude F. Gaddy, Chairman of the Committee on Education, 
brought a report, which included the recommendation of the Edu- 
cation Council, suggesting that appropriations for current support 
for the schools for the last six months of the year 1944 be the 
same as for the first six months. 

2. Louis S. Gaines made a report for the Committee to Pur- 
chase a Home for the General Secretary, which report follows : 
(This committee was composed of W. H. Weatherspoon, J. M. 
Broughton, Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, J. Winston Pearce, Louis S. 
Gaines, Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn, A. D. Kinnett.) 

"The General Board in its meeting on January 17, 1944 took the following 
action. 

'The Convention, in its 1943 session, appointed a committee of 
which W. H. Weatherspoon was named chairman, to investigate 
the needs for and advisability of procuring a home for the General 
Secretary of the Convention. Following a discussion of the mat- 
ter it was agreed that this committee should, upon the consent 
and recommendation of the Executive Committee, be clothed with 
sufficient power to make final disposition of the matter.' 

"Following that action the special committee, working in close cooperation 
with the Executive Committee of the General' Board, made extensive inquiry 
all over the city of Raleigh for a suitable place, and the Executive Committee 
has considered ways and means of financing such a purchase should a place be 
secured. 

"Your special committee at its first meeting decided that it was wise to 
secure a place the cost of which would not be in excess of $20,000. After a 
thorough canvass of the situation, however, no suitable place could be found 
at that figure. A place was found, however, at 1509 Hillsboro Street, at a 
purchase price of $22,500. However, there is a large garage apartment that 
has been renting for several years at around $50 a month, thus bringing in 
about $600 a year. The committee, therefore, figures that the house itself 
would have a value of about $19,000 and, on the basis of present income, the 
garage apartment a value of $3,500 to $4,000, which will over a period of a 
few years cause the property to cost much less than $20,000. 

"The property is well located, making it easily accessible to people from 
out of town who wish to see the secretary. It is also in walking distance of 
both a grade and high school. 

"Your special committee has learned from the Executive Committee that 
the money for the purchase of the property can be secured and the property 
paid for in the course of a few years without the use of any mission money 
given by the churches, either designated or undesignated. 

"Your special committee, therefore, unanimously recommends that the prop- 
erty be purchased, and that the General Board authorize the Executive Com- 
mittee to secure the necessary funds for said purchase." 

(Pursuant to this action the property was purchased. The income from 
the apartment, now amounting to $64 a month, plus the $600 allowance for a 
home for the General Secretary, will go into a fund to retire the indebted- 
ness.) 



Annual of Session 1944 75 

87. 

II. MEETINGS OF THE COUNCIL ON CHRISTIAN 
EDUCATION 

We bring herewith a summary of the work of the Education Council ap- 
pointed by the last Convention : 

The Council on Christian Education was organized by the Baptist State 
Convention in its meeting in Winston-Salem in 1943. In addition to four 
representatives from each of the five colleges receiving operating funds from 
the Convention, there are five members as follows : President of the Conven- 
tion ; President of the Woman's Missionary Union ; President of the General 
Board; Chairman of the Education Committee of the General Board; and the 
General Secretary of the Convention — thereby making a total membership of 
twenty-five members on the present council. The five colleges are Wake 
Forest, Meredith, Mars Hill, Campbell and Wingate. 

The Council was directed to meet quarterly, at the call of the General Sec- 
retary, and make a report of its work to the Convention in annual meeting. 

A meeting has been held each quarter with nineteen members present for 
two meetings and twenty for the last meeting, which was held in Raleigh on 
October 9. All colleges have been represented in each meeting. 

The permanent organization provides that the Chairman of the Education 
Committee of the General Board and the President of the State W. M. U. 
shall be Chairman and Recording Secretary of the Council. 

The work of the Council has been devoted largely to a study of the prob- 
lems in the operation of the five Baptist colleges and a consideration of the 
equitable distribution of the funds available for operating purposes. With 
the exception of Meredith College there has been a marked decrease in en- 
rollment because of the war. At the present there are approximately 2,300 
young men and young women enrolled in our five Baptist colleges. For the 
education of these young people the Baptists of North Carolina are con- 
tributing $71,000 through the Cooperative Program funds in 1944, or a little 
more than $30.00 per student. The present plans for 1945 should increase this 
from $30.00 per student to more than $56.00, or about double the present 
amount. 

A committee of the Council representing each of the colleges is now pre- 
paring a folder of information on the various colleges to be distributed through- 
out the State, especially to the students in the public high schools. 

In the second quarterly meeting, April 28, 1944, a sub-committee was ap- 
pointed from each college to study and make recommendations regarding the 
allocation of operating funds for 1945. In meeting on October 9, 1944, this 
committee made a report of its findings as follows : 

1. The enrollment in Wake Forest and Meredith colleges for 
1944 are practically the same, and the schedule of charges to stu- 
dents are the same. In the junior colleges with different enroll- 
ments the charges to students are approximately the same. 

2. The endowment funds range from practically nothing in 
Wingate College to more than three million dollars in Wake 
Forest College, thereby making operating income among the col- 
leges a wide variable. 



76 * N. C. Baptist State Convention 

3. The policy with respect to dormitory and dining hall prac- 
tices among the schools varies too widely for the income to be 
considered in the allocation of funds at the present. 

4. That the need for definite information on the amounts to 
be provided for 1945 makes it necessary to have some action based 
on the best information available, with further study to be given 
the problems involved. 

After giving much time in hearing and discussing the various items of the 
report of the committee the Council made the following recommendations to 
the General Board and to the Convention : 

1. That under present abnormal conditions it be the policy of 
the Convention to allocate for operating costs only 50% of the 
Cooperative Program funds for Christian Education, with the 
provision that for 1945 a total of $130,000 be divided among the 
colleges for operating costs as follows : 

Wake Forest College $36,000 

Meredith College 36,000 

Mars Hill 30,000 

Campbell 23,000 

Wingate 5,000 

The matter of allocating the remaining funds is to be given 
further study for future recommendations. 

2. That the General Board be urged, in making the allocation 
of Cooperative Program funds for 1945, insofar as possible to 
maintain the same proportion for Christian Education as is now 
provided. 

In concluding this brief summary of the work done by the Council on 
Christian Education in its first year of existence, the Chairman would like to 
observe that the undertaking seems to have justified the hope of those who 
favored its inauguration in that it has brought together those who are re- 
sponsible for the operation of our Baptist colleges, and in so doing has enabled 
us to see our problems both individually and collectively. Baptists in North 
Carolina are in the midst of great opportunities in Christian education, and this 
Council should be, and can be, their best guide. 



III. THE YEAR 1944— ITEMS OF INTEREST 

1. Changes in Personnel: In the report of meetings of the General Board 
mention has been made of several changes in personnel. We wish to make 
here some further reference. 

During the year General Missionary M. O. Alexander resigned his position 
with the General Board to enter the pastorate, having accepted a call to the 
Beaufort Church. For about nine years Mr. Alexander did a most con- 
structive work in the churches and in the general meetings. The records will 
prove, we think, that scores of churches touched by Mr. Alexander have not 
been the same sort of churches since his visits. Blessed with excellent health 



Annual of Session 1944 77 

he was able to go here and there any time and all the time. We are glad to 
record here sincere appreciation for his effective services. 

W. H. Moore came with the Board to assist the General Secretary in 
spreading the appeal for funds for the Wake Forest chapel and in visiting 
pastors in an effort to enlist them in the Ministers' Retirement Plan. Soon 
after he came, due to the war effort, it was difficult for him to get enough 
gas to do the work assigned to him. He was, therefore, compelled to travel 
by bus much of the time. This placed a heavy strain on him physically. Even 
so he served the Board with great loyalty and devotion. In August of this 
year he reentered the pastorate, having accepted a call to Becks Church in the 
Pilot Mountain Association. 

After nine years of service with our Board Mr. and Mrs. John B. Lane 
resigned as associates in the Sunday School Division. Mr. Lane was called 
to South Carloina as State Training Union Secretary. We express our thanks 
to Mr. and Mrs. Lane, and to Mr. Lane our congratulations upon the call 
that has come to a larger field of service, in which his responsibilities and 
opportunities will be greater. 

During the year the First Church of High Point extended a call to W. 
Wilbur Hutchins, our State Training Union Secretary, and he felt led to 
accept the call. To the work of the Training Union in the State he brought 
marked ability and devotion. It was in his mind and heart to enlarge the 
work of the Training Union and to enlist the multiplied thousands of our 
young people now unenlisted. To succeed him the Board considers itself most 
fortunate in the selection of Air. Harvey T. Gibson as State Training Union 
Secretary. Mr. Gibson was at the time of his election assistant professor of 
English at State College. Prior to that time he had taught for some years in 
the Durham High School. During these, years, however, he has been most 
active in Sunday School and Training Union work. To this work he brings 
a strong body, a well-furnished mind and deep devotion. 

As Mr. Gibson's associate, working in the main with the young people, 
Law M. Mobley, a native of South Carolina and a graduate of our Southern 
Seminary at Louisville in 1944, was elected. 

For some time we have been looking around for someone to become an 
associate in the Training Union Division to give attention principally to juniors. 
To this position Miss Louise Paschal, a 1944 graduate of the W. M. U. 
Training School, was elected. She brings to the task excellent training. She 
has had much experience in association-wide and state-wide training schools. 

Thus for the first time in a long time we have a full complement of workers 
in the Training Union Division, although Miss Margaret Sparks has been 
granted a leave of absence for a year's study at the W. M. U. Training School. 

In the matter of personnel attention is called to the fact that just now there 
is great need for an additional General Missionary, or someone who will give 
his time almost completely to the development of the rural churches. There 
is also needed for a period of one to five years a man whose task it will be 
to assist the General Secretary in enlisting the pastors who are not now mem- 
bers of the Ministers' Retirement Plan. Also there is urgent need for a full- 
time man whose work will be the enlisting of the one hundred thousand Bap- 
tist men in our churches. Soon, we trust, multiplied thousands of our young 



78 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

men will be returning to their churches. It remains to be seen whether they 
will return to active or inactive service in the churches. A leader is greatly 
needed. 

2. Increase in Incomes: The report of the auditor will show that during 
the year, closing with September 30, the income of the Convention has in- 
creased more than 20%. In 1943 the total income for all objects of the 
Convention, designated and undesignated, was $1,403,476.89. During the present 
calendar year we are maintaining an increase of more than 20%, and it appears 
that the total, income for 1944 will be around $1,600,000. 

3. Convention Debts : It appears at the writing of this report that the 
Convention should be out of debt, or well nigh out, on December 31 of this 
year. This has been made possible because of the substantial increase in the 
Undesignated Cooperative Program and gifts through the Hundred Thousand 
Club. Let us recall that at the beginning of 1937 the Convention owed $800,000 
on the old educational debt, and since that time the Convention has undertaken 
to build the chapel at Wake Forest and has also underwritten an indebtedness 
of $95,000 for the Hospital. Recently the final payment of $22,000 was made 
on the original loan, made in 1923, for the first unit of the Hospital. This 
payment and the continued reduction in the loan of $95,000 were made pos- 
sible because of the increase in the Undesignated Cooperative Program and 
the enlarged offering on Mother's Day. The Convention last year ordered 
that all money received in the Mother's Day offering above $75,000 should 
go to the retirement of the debt on the Hospital, which had been assumed by 
the Convention. Since the Mother's Day offering amounted to about $95,000 
there has been about $20,000 available to use for payment on the debt apart 
from the receipts from the Cooperative Program. 

Beginning with the new year the Hundred Thousand Club will not be 
needed. It has fulfilled in large measure the purpose for which it was begun. 
It is very necessary, however, that the churches continue it for the remainder 
of 1944. Whether we get out of debt this year will depend to a large extent 
upon the gifts to the Hundred Thousand Club for the remainder of the year. 

In the sessions of the Convention for the past twenty years much attention 
has been given to the matter of debts. When the Convention meets one year 
hence, the Lord willing, it is hoped that no mention whatever need be made 
of debts, that is so far as debts to creditors are concerned. 

4. Wake Forest Chapel : Thus far we have received about $30,000 from 
individuals and churches, who placed the item in their budgets, for the chapel. 
It will be remembered that the Music and Religion Building was completed 
two years ago. Months ago the main chapel building was housed in and the 
outside virtually completed. The inside remains unfinished. If the recom- 
mendation which the Board is making to this Convention with reference to the 
chapel is followed it is hoped that all the money borrowed to house in the 
chapel can be paid by the end of the year. In that event only an amount of 
money sufficient to complete the inside of the chapel will be needed in 1945. 

5. Ministers' Retirement Plan : Up to this date 588 certificates have 
been issued. To be sure some of these have been cancelled for one reason or 
another. A few of the men who are considered members, together with their 
churches, are in arrears. Since there are more than 1200 active pastors in the 



Annual of Session 1944 79 

State there ought to be that many in the Plan. Recent reports from the Relief 
and Annuity Board, which administers the Plan, reveal the fact that the fund 
is in excellent financial condition. Some pastors who had retired and who 
were receiving an annuity have been called back into active service, while 
others who have reached the age of retirement, sixty-five, and are entitled to 
retire, have not done so because they are needed. These two factors are 
adding strength to the Plan in that they are helping to build up a great reserve 
for the years ahead. 

We call attention once more to this fact. Many pastors have hesitated to 
enter the Plan because of a heavy program of insurance which they are carry- 
ing, some of it endowment insurance. We have urged them to take advantage 
of the fact that they can enter the Ministers' Retirement Plan on a two, three 
or four per cent basis and build up an annuity in proportion to their payments. 
We call attention again to this feature of the North Carolina Plan, a feature 
which the plans of other states do not have. Wise pastors, we believe, will so 
adjust their insurance budget that they may enter the Ministers' Retirement 
Plan on at least a 2 per cent basis. They can switch from the two per cent to 
three or four per cent at any time, even within any given year. 

Along with the auditor's report for the fiscal year, ending December 31, 
1944, we hope to include a statement of the financial condition of the Ministers' 
Retirement Plan. 

In this connection also we call attention to an action taken by the Executive 
Committee, and reported herein in the report of the meetings of the General 
Board, which makes it possible for a pastor who is a member of the Minis- 
ters' Retirement Plan to continue in that plan in the event he should become 
an associational missionary or an employee of the General Board in any way, 
or may join the Plan, as a pastor at large. Such person is also eligible to 
become a member of the Boards Employees Retirement Plan. Following the 
action of the Executive Committee satisfactory arrangements on this basis 
were worked out with the Relief and Annuity Board. 

6. Work in the Camp Areas: Thus far some $60,000 have been expended 
to provide workers and buildings in the war areas. All the opportunities pre- 
sented to us have not been met, but we do record with gratitude that some 
have been met. In the Sunset Park area of Wilmington there stands the 
Sunset Park Church the first unit of which has been completed at a cost of 
some $35,000, and on the adjoining lot there is a pastor's home valued at some 
$7,500. About a mile away is the Maffitt Village Church which was begun 
at a mission of the Sunset Park Church. The Convention has put no money 
into this project, except indirectly through Sunset Park. 

At Carolina Beach there stands a lovely building, and on the lot adjoining 
there is a commodious pastor's home, the two together being worth around 
$30,000. 

Money has been borrowed by the congregations of these churches, with the 
endorsement of the Trustees of the Convention. The title to the property 
remains with the Convention, but payments on the loans are being made monthly 
by the congregations of the churches. 

In Fayetteville there is the Immanuel Church, almost completely paid for, 
and Trinity Church, valued at some $22,500, nearing completion. Into the 



80 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Trinity Church the Convention is putting about $6,000, the New South River 
about $4,000, and the remaining money is being raised, or borrowed, by the 
church. The title for this property is held by the trustees of the church and 
not by the Convention. An effort is now being made to establish a church in 
the Spring Lake section, north of Fort Bragg, where there are some two to 
three thousand people living. 

The Convention owns lots in Wilmington and Holly Ridge upon which no 
buildings have been erected. 

It is likely that the greater part of the money needed for the war areas has 
already been expended. 

7. Lots in Other Areas : In areas other than the war areas the Board 
has continued its policy of purchasing lots in growing and strategic centers. 
Within the year lots have been purchased in Burlington, Greensboro, Thomas- 
ville. In the rural areas some churches have been aided in order that they 
might relocate. 

8. Allied Church League : Last year reference was made to the fact that 
the Allied Church League had been organized and that Mr. L. A. Martin of 
Lexington had become the Executive Director. An appropriation of $5,500 
was made from State Mission funds for the support of this work. We record 
here as a matter of record that the two Methodist Conferences in the State 
appropriated a like amount. Some support has come also from other de- 
nominations. Mr. Martin has been busy throughout the year visiting in the 
churches and in general meetings among Baptists and other denominations 
seeking to arouse the people to the evils of traffic in alcoholic beverages. One 
must admit that it is about time something was being done when we reflect 
that during the present year perhaps $70,000,000 will be expended in North 
Carolina for liquor, beer and wine. Our appropriation should be increased 
somewhat in order that an assistant to Mr. Martin may be secured. There is 
reason to believe that the Methodist Conferences are ready to increase their 
appropriations. 

Perhaps the most effective piece of work Mr. Martin has done is in the 
publication of the paper ToMorrow. It is on the whole, we think, the best 
publication of its kind, and we rejoice that the circulation has now reached 
upwards of around 10,000. Pastors and other church leaders would do well 
to give it circulation among the membership of the churches. 

Last year the Convention, as provided by the Constitution of the Allied 
Church League, nominated to the League fifty-five members. The same should 
be done by this Convention. 

9. Associational Missionaries : Perhaps the most outstanding develop- 
ment in our work has been the employment of a great number of associational 
missionaries. There are at present about twenty men and women giving full 
time to this work, and many other associations are calling for them. It has 
been the policy of the Board to provide about one-half of the salary of many 
of these missionaries. In some instances the full salary is being taken care 
of by the associations themselves, and in one instance the General Board is 
paying only the traveling expense. We know of no case in which the leaders 
of an Association attempted to raise funds for this purpose and failed. The 
main problem now is not one of raising the money, but rather one of securing 



Annual of Session 1944 81 

well-qualified workers. Some of the workers who have been secured are with- 
out much experience, but efforts have been made through conferences of 
various kinds to acquaint them with the opportunities and problems involved 
in the work. The job needs very much to be done. There are nearly half a 
million unreached possibilities for our Sunday schools ; there are perhaps a 
quarter of a million prospects for the Training Unions ; and on the whole one 
may say that fully one-third of the members of our churches are almost wholly 
unenlisted in the total work of the church. These conditions state the task 
of the associational missionary, working always to aid the pastor in every way 
possible. Perhaps no more significant movement is taking place among us now 
than the increased attention given to associational mission work. 

In this connection mention should be made of the cooperation of the Home 
Mission Board in the City Mission work. At the present time the General 
Board is cooperating with the Home Mission Board in carrying on work in 
Durham and the Mount Zion Association under the leadership of F. D. Hemp- 
hill, and in Greensboro and the Piedmont Association under the leadership of 
T. L. Sasser. Plans have just been completed for the employment of H. 
Fletcher Lambert in the Raleigh Association. 

89. 

IV. THE YEAR 1945 

In the foregoing paragraphs we have undertaken to mention some matters 
to which special attention has been given during the present year. In the fol- 
lowing paragraphs we call attention to some matters which must claim our 
attention in the year ahead, including of course a continuance of those things 
which have been mentioned in the preceding paragraphs. 

1. The Southern Baptist Centennial Crusade: In a very real sense 
North Carolina Baptists are called upon to be Southern Baptists during the 
next year. In connection with their Centennial, Southern Baptists are seeking 
to place the main emphasis in the months ahead on evangelism here at home 
and on an increased support for a world program both at home and abroad. 
In short Southern Baptists are seeking to win a million people in the southland 
to Christ in 1945. If we in North Carolina do our part we must seek to win 
at least one hundred thousand. Then in planning for a world mission program 
we must undertake to step up receipts through the Undesignated Cooperative 
Program by at least one-third. Southern Baptists are thinking in terms of a 
goal of $20,000,000 in 1945, including of course all gifts to missions, Christian 
education and benevolence. This means that in North Carolina we must under- 
take a goal of $2,000,000. It is believed that total receipts will reach $1,600,000 
this year ; and this means we must step up our gifts by $400,000. 

In this .connection we point out that a convergence of events is forcing upon 
individuals and upon churches the making of great decisions. These events 
are: Most churches are now out of debt on their buildings and are now in 
position to enlarge their gifts to the objects of the Convention — missions, edu- 
cation and benevolence. This can be done without the giving of any more 
money than they have been giving. The question to be decided is whether 
they are as much interested in missions as in the erection of a church building. 

In the second place the Convention itself will be out of debt, or very nearly 



82 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

out, and therefore, in a position to construct rather than merely to pay for 
what was constructed years ago. 

In the third place the centennial of the Southern Convention should greatly 
stimulate renewed emphasis in evangelism at home and missions abroad. 

Then the war will, we trust, be over soon and the lights, physically speaking, 
will again come on all over the world. It will be a magnificent opportunity 
for the Christian people of the world to see to it that the light from above 
is also turned on. 

Whether we like it or not these facts are forcing upon individuals and 
churches, we repeat, the making of great decisions. With the debts paid there 
should dawn a new day for our educational institutions as well as for our 
benevolent institutions, the Hospital and the Orphanage. In the providence 
of God we are matched with a great hour. God forbid that we should fail. 

2. The Truett Memorial Church : The membership of the Hayesville 
Baptist Church, now worshiping in an inadequate, wooden building, are de- 
sirous of erecting a new building to be known as the Truett Memorial Church. 
The membership is not large and a large building will not be needed. It is 
believed, however, that it should be beautiful, and the desire is to build it out 
of western North Carolina stone. Perhaps $25,000 will be needed. At first 
it was the thought of those interested in the project to issue invitations to 
friends of Dr. Truett in other states to have a part in the erection of this 
building. Upon further reflection, however, it is our thought that the appeal 
should be made to North Carolina Baptists alone. We are well able to do it, 
and perhaps will hardly miss the amount needed. Accordingly the General 
Board is making a recommendation, which will be found at the end of this 
report. 

It should be added that within the year much repair work has been done 
at the birthplace of Dr. Truett, which is located about a mile from Hayesville, 
and which is now owned by the Baptist State Convention. A new roof has 
been placed on the house, the porches repaired, and some grading has been 
done on the road which will enable those who visit the place to encircle the 
house, thus making it much easier for the visitor. The State Historical Com- 
mission has been asked to place a steel marker on the highway. We have 
assurance that this will be done once the war is over and steel is again avail- 
able for such purposes. 

3. The Fruitland Institute Property: This property is owned jointly by 
the Home Mission Board and our Convention. It has a value of perhaps 
$75,000. A tentative offer of $20,000 has been received' for the property. This 
offer has brought up anew the consideration of possible uses to which the 
property may be put. An idea has been advanced that it might be found 
useful for a group of underprivileged children in the State who are not being 
cared for by our Convention forces. These are children who cannot qualify 
as full orphans but who for all practical purposes may be more underprivileged 
than are many orphans. The only institution of this kind in the State, Alex- 
ander Schools located at Union Mills, is doing a noble work in meeting the 
needs of these children. Information has come to us, however, that this school 
cannot meet the needs. It may be that the Fruitland Institute property could 
be utilized to good advanage for such a purpose. To this end a recommenda- 
tion is made at the end of this report. 



Annual of Session 1944 



83 



90. 



V. RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



We bring to the Convention the letter of the auditor and a brief statement 
of receipts and expenditures for the twelve months period ending September 
30, 1944. At the end of the calendar year, which is the fiscal year of the 
Convention, a more detailed audit for the calendar year 1944 will be presented. 

Auditor's Statement 



Executive Committee of the General Board 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Gentlemen: 

According to your instructions, we have audited the books and records of the Convention for the 
twelve months ended September 30, 1944, and prepared the following statements of cash receipts and 
disbursements. 

All cash receipts were found to have been promptly deposited in the banks and disbursements were 
supported by cancelled checks, invoices, etc., with expenses properly classified. Our examination did 
not disclose any evidence of irregularities and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly 
handled and all accounted for. 

After the books have been closed for the current calendar year we will complete the audit and report 
to you in detail the income and expenditures for 1944. 



Raleigh, N. C. 
October 30, 1944. 



Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. Allen & Company, 

Certified Public Accountants. 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 1944 



Cash 
Balance 
10-1-43 



Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 



Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 



Cash 
Balance 
9-30-44 



GENERAL FUND 
Receipts: 

From Churches Undesignated-, 

Disbursements: 

General 

Promotion 

Woman's Missionary Union 



£ 49,386.31 



Total Disbursements General Fund 
and Ending Cash Balance 



STATE MISSIONS 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds 

Miscellaneous Income: 

Baptist Foundation 

Baptist Sunday School Board 

Gifts for Oteen Support 

Refund— B. T. A. Assembly 

Rent McCullers Church 

From Churches for Pastors' Salaries 

Camp Areas 

Share of General Fund — IS per cent 



2 4,991.31 



$ 62,538.19 

465.00 

11,167.34 

714.88 

760.25 

12.00 

1,902.95 
97,012.97 



Total Beginning Cash Balance and 
Receipts 



$ 4,991.31 



$ 174,573.58 



20,802.14 
15,399.80 
13,184.37 



$ 49,386.31 



84 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-43 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-44 


Disbursements: 

Department of Christian Education in the 
Churches: 






3 16,078.70 
12,979.47 
13,132.44 

7,401.74 

1,840.00 

3,146.00 

1,800.00 

13,800.29 

34,620.26 

29,265.01 

3,300.00 

6,063.15 

82.25 

2,365.21 

1,703.47 
1,893.92 

431.00 

355.34 
704.79 

600.00 

17,300.44 

1,907.65 

402.31 




















Other State Mission Work: 






















































i 


Miscellaneous: 








Workers for Temperance and Allied 
























Subscriptions to Pastors ■ — ■ Biblical 
















Salaries — Recording and Statistical 
























Preparation Manuscript History of 








































Total Disbursements and End- 


$ 171,173.44 


$ 8,391.45 




$ 6,863.23 


3 2,050.00 




MINISTERS' RELIEF FUND— SPECIAL 
Receipts: 

From Baptist Foundation and Beginning 


$ 3,125.00 














$ 5,788.23 






$ 1,042.46 
6,467.55 




EDUCATION MINISTERIAL AID 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds and from Baptist Foun- 


$ 6,892.50 




Share of General Fund — 1 per cent 






Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


$ 3,232.61 


$ 7,510.01 








Disbursements: 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


? 6,892.50 


$ 3,850.12 






$ 28,626.09 
32,337.65 




NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL FUND 
Receipts: 














$ 2,957.44 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


$ 60,963.74 









Annual of Session 1944 85 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-43 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-44 


Disbursements: 






3 11,577.06 

23,250.00 

1,647.84 

24,400.00 

612.00 




Payments on Note — Wachovia Bank and 








Payments on Interest — Wachovia Bank 








Payments on Note — Security Life and 








Payments on Interest — Security Life and 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 61,486.90 


3 2,434.28 






3 8,178.25 




MINISTERS' RETIREMENT FUND 
Receipts: 

Share of General Fund — 1943 2 per cent— 


3 7,383.88 
1,642.50 

286.10 

2,488.36 






3 3,821.83 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 
Balance 


3 8,178.25 




Disbursements: 
















Office Expense and Equipment, Printing 
























Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 11,800.84 


3 199.24 






3 41,637.03 

2,234.31 
65,000.00 




WAKE FOREST CHAPEL BUILDING 
FUND 
Receipts: 


3 1,183.99 

45,300.00 

50,000.00 

2,405.00 
14.00 




Transfer of Unexpended Balance at 
12-31-43: 
From Current Support by order of Fx- 














3 7,416.69 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 108,871.34 








Disbursements: 

Salaries, Travel, House Rent, Printing, 








To Treasurer — Wake Forest Chapel Build- 








Paid on Notes — Wachovia Bank and Trust 
Co 








Paid on Interest — Wachovia Bank and 
























Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 98,902.99 


3 2,551.66 






3 2,389.67 




AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
Receipts: 


3 2,114.32 






3 30.08 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 
Balance - . 


3 2,389.67 




Disbursements: 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 2,114.32 


3 305.43 











86 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-43 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-44 


LOUISVILLE SEMINARY CHAPEL 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds and Beginning Balance. 




? 3,604.45 


3 3,550.45 








Disbursements: 

Remitted to Southern Baptist Theological 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 3,550.45 


3 54.00 






$ 667.52 
153,428.07 
55,847.77 




education CONVENTION DEBT 

Receipts: 


3 182,500.00 

3,850.00 

14,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,749.75 

121.00 

150.90 

65.00 




Share of General Fund (1943 23 per cent — 
1944 24 per cent)_._ -.- 






Apportionment from Hundred Thousand 
Club 








224,614.79 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 209,943.36 








Disbursements: 

Borrowed Money Repaid — Wachovia Bank 








































































Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 206,436.65 


3 28,121.50 






3 3,537.25 
90,545.44 




EDUCATION CURRENT SUPPORT 

Receipts: 


3 2,234.31 

82,425.00 

1,350.00 

315.57 












321,138.10 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 94,082.69 








Disbursements: 
Transfer to Wake Forest Chapel Building 
Fund Unexpended Balance at 12-31-43 
























Expense Education Commission and Coun- 
cil 
















Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 86,324.88 


3 28,895.91 






3 67,770.79 

51,248.83 

190,815.35 

2,376.79 

258,701.21 




SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS FUND 
Receipts: 


















Designations — Ministerial Relief — Regular 








341,750.44 




Total Receipts and Beginning Cash 


3 570,912.97 









Annual of Session 1944 



87 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— Continued 





Cash 
Balance 
10-1-43 


Receipts for 
Fiscal 
Year 


Disbursements 

for Fiscal 

Year 


Cash 
Balance 
9-30-44 


Disbursements: 






3 251,559.84 

12,899.90 
194,587.25 
51,066.77 

2,234.45 
55,847.77 




Paid on Designations Hundred Thousand 
Club (Oct. Nov. & Dec. 1943 50 per cent 








Foreign Mission Designations and Expenses. 
Home Mission Designations and Expenses. 
Ministerial Relief — Regular — Designations 




















Apportionment of Hundred Thousand Club 














Total Disbursements and Ending 


3 568,195.98 


3 37,616.07 










Due State Program from September 
Designations Hundred Thousand 




6,851.36 




3101,983.14 


31,292,466.37 


31,269,390.26 




GRAND TOTALS 


3125,059.25 

















91. 

VI. DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

A. HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 

During the twelve months period ending September 30, 1944, we have for- 
warded for all Southern Baptist Convention objects $512,744.08, a gain of 
$117,406.46 over the preceding year. During a corresponding period ending 
September 30, 1943, the gain over the preceding year was $74,873.42. 

Undesignated funds for Southern Baptist Convention objects during 1944 
are divided as follows : 

Per Cent 

Foreign Mission Board 50 

Home Mission Board 23 1/3 

Relief and Annuity Board 10 1/3 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Baptist Bible Institute 4 1/5 

W. M. U. Training School 8 1/5 

American Baptist Theological Seminary 1 1/2 

Southern Baptist Hospital 1 7/10 



100 



B. STATE MISSIONS 

Introduction 

In the first part of this report attention has been called to those matters 
which received our main emphasis in 1944. In that connection mention was 
made of many of the phases of State Mission work. We do not repeat those 
here. We do call attention to the fact that we believe an aggressive State 



88 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Mission program has been carried on, and of course we are committed to the 
proposition that such a program must be continued. 

Last year we were enabled to lay aside in reserve $15,000 out of State 
Mission funds. While money is plentiful it is felt that this should be done 
in order that we may be able to meet the needs which certainly will arise in 
the event there is a decline in receipts. It is hoped that another $15,000 may 
be laid aside out of this year's receipts. This money has been deposited with 
the Baptist Foundation, and is now earning interest which is being used for 
State Mission work. In the event this fund should not be needed in the future 
there will always be the interest accruing for State Mission work. 

1. General Missionaries 

In the report last year we made mention of the election of E. Lowell Spivey 
to succeed Douglas M. Branch. Mr. Spivey was quite ill for a time early in 
this year. We record with joy, however, the fact that after weeks in the 
hospital he has resumed work. Living in Charlotte he is able to touch that 
great area of our State that is very difficult for one living in Raleigh to touch. 
His work has been marked by enthusiasm and devotion, together with ability. 

As yet the Board has not been able to secure anyone to succeed M. O. 
Alexander, who resigned early in the year and to which reference is made in 
another part of this report. 

Brief reports from our two General Missionaries follows : 

(a) Report of J. C. Pipes 

Below is a brief summary of my work as General Missionary of the Bap- 
tist State Convention of North Carolina from October 1, 1943 to September 
30, 1944. 

I attended eight annual associations. 

Conducted four Sunday School study courses of one week each. 

Held five evangelistic revivals. 

Held six pastors' revivals of one week each. 

Attended numbers of one-day pastors' conferences and pre- 
sented different phases of our Convention work. 

Attended one pastors' school at Mars Hill. 

Conducted thirteen one-week stewardship revivals. 

Assisted in two one-week associational wide schools of mis- 
sions. 

Attended the Baptist State Convention, and the Sunday School 
Convention. 

Attended a part of the week of Home Mission Conferences at 
Ridgecrest. 

Besides the above I have served as part-time pastor of the Macedonia Bap- 
tist Church in the Buncombe Association. I have given as much time as 
possible to this little country church. The church has responded in a great 
way to the whole program of Baptists. They have given for all causes more 
than $3100 as compared with the gifts of $1300 during the previous year. 

As best I can see the people of the churches where I have worked are 



Annual of Session 1944 89 

more open to teaching and more responsive to the Program of Jesus than I 
have ever known before. Even the small country churches that have never 
had any organized financial system are anxious to work out budgets and in- 
clude in these budgets all the objects sponsored by our Baptist State Conven- 
tion. The spirit in the Associations that I have attended this year is the best 
I have ever known. It seems to me that our people in general are getting a 
world vision of Christ's Kingdom and are responding to that vision in a great 
way. Where there is vision the people grow. 

(b) Report of E. L. Spivey 

October 1, 1943 I entered the field as your general missionary. The pastors 
and people of our churches have been very gracious in their encouragement 
and co-operation. I am grateful for their fellowship as "workers together 
with God." Our General Secretary, Mr. M. A. Huggins has been patient with 
my inexperience, most helpful in my efforts, and very considerate in my af- 
fliction. I wish here to record my debt of gratitude to this incomparable leader 
of North Carolina Baptists. 

I offer below a brief summary of my activities during the past year : 

Participated in IS annual associational meetings. Presented 
the work of State Missions to 24 missionary societies, Sunday 
Schools and churches. Delivered 15 stewardship messages; con- 
ducted 2 stewardship revivals ; worked in 3 pastors' schools, one 
Training Union School ; and participated in three schools of mis- 
sions. 

Visited 48 pastors and churches in the interest of the Wake 
Forest College Chapel, and communicated with 34 others by let- 
ters and telephone. 

Made many contacts in the interest of 100,000 club, the Retire- 
ment Plan, and the annual Pastors' School at Gardner-Webb 
College. 

Assisted pastors in 6 evangelistic meetings. 

Visited 8 mission Sunday Schools and churches. 

Attended the annual meetings of the General Board, the State 
Sunday School Convention, the Baptist State Convention, and the 
South-wide Bible Teaching Clinic. 

Spoke at dedication of 3 churches ; participated in 3 ordination 
services. 

Attended part of the Home Mission Week at Ridgecrest. 

Participated in several pastors' conferences. 

Discussed the work of the Convention with many pastors and 
laymen. 

Met with several Associational Missionaries and Associational 
Leaders in planning work for 1944-45. 

Spoke over the radio five times on Stewardship and Missions 
and related subjects. 

Supplied for 13 pastors and pastorless churches. 

Cancelled 12 weeks of engagements, Feb. 13 to June 4, because 
of illness. 



90 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

May we dedicate afresh our lives and our substance to the Great Crusade 
for Christ during the coming year. 

2. Missionary Pastoral Assistance 

We give below a summary of the work done by our missionary pastors 
from October 1, 1943 through September 30, 1944: 

Number of Missionary Pastors 66 

Number of churches aided 121 

Sermons 5,842 

Other addresses 2,748 

Revivals held 128 

Training Classes conducted 59 

Visits made 21,682 

Conversions 1,150 

Baptisms 902 

Additions other than by baptism 900 

Churches repaired or being built 42 

Subscriptions secured to Charity and Children 232 

Subscriptions secured to Biblical Recorder 630 

Subscriptions secured to Mission Magazines 463 

The following amounts were reported as gifts made by churches during 
the period: 

Building and Repairs $ 63,476 

Pastors' Salaries 72,284 

Undesignated Cooperative Program 13,690 

State Missions 1,548 

Home Missions 739 

Foreign Missions 3,448 

Heck Memorial 67 

Education 756 

Hundred Thousand Club 1,371 

Orphanage 6,864 

Aid in Evangelistic Meetings 1,794 

Hospital 2,046 

Local Charity, Red Cross, Polio Hospital 1,868 

American Bible Society 101 

Total $170,052 

92. 

3. Church Extension 

The Board has numerous calls for help on buildings from all over the State. 
In most cases the Board has not been able to meet these requests. Except in 
most unusual cases help on buildings has been confined to the war areas where 
buildings were urgently needed, and where churches had to be organized and 
the work started. The Convention had to take the lead in such instances, or 
nothing could have been done in most cases. The Convention has followed its 



Annual of Session 1944 91 

policy of buying choice lots in growing residential sections and holding them 
until such time as it seemed wise to organize churches. The Board could spend 
profitably fifty to one hundred thousand dollars in all sections of the State in 
aiding poorly located churches in the country to abandon their old buildings 
located far away from the highways and relocate on the highways where they 
would be more accessible to the membership. We are happy to announce that 
some progress has been made in this direction. Only a lack of funds prevents 
the doing of the thing we know ought to be done. 

We give below a statement of funds expended from November 1, 1943 
through September 30, 1944. 

Church Association Amount 

Boone Three Forks $ 1,500.00 

Calvary Raleigh 375.00 

Carolina Beach Wilmington 7,000.00 

Cool Springs Three Forks 100.00 

Emmanuel Mecklenburg 500.00 

Fairfield Chowan 118.55 

Fairview Gaston 125.00 

Farmer Memorial Ashe 50.00 

Immanuel, Fayetteville Roanoke 738.69 

Little Glade .West Liberty 100.00 

Long View Macon 200.00 

Maffitt Village Wilmington 500.00 

McConnell Road Mission Piedmont 150.00 

McLeansville .Piedmont 200.00 

Montvale Transylvania 100.00 

New River Alleghany 180.00 

North Beaver Ashe 200.00 

North Warrenton Tar River 50.00 

Pembroke (Indian) Burnt Swamp 147.50 

Pullen Memorial Raleigh 2,750.00 

Sunset Park Wilmington 6,641.14 

Topton Western N. Carolina 100.00 

Union Roanoke 150.00 

West Greensboro Piedmont 753.75 

West Thomasville Liberty 1,200.00 

Windsor Terrace Fayetteville 5,000.00 



93. 



Total $28,929.63 



4. Work Among the Indians 



Rev. and Mrs. P. A. Underwood continue their work among the Indians 
in Robeson County. A year or two ago the Indians themselves erected a small 
home at Pembroke for orphan children. The Board is happy that Mr. and 
Mrs. Underwood have been able to have some part in carrying on that work. 



92 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

They make reference to this phase of the work in the brief report of their 
work for the year ending September 30, 1944, which follows : 

The past years has marked progress in the Burnt Swamp Association. 
The Indian people are interested in their church activities and their reports 
show steady gains. Once they have caught the vision, they press toward the 
mark of the prize of the high calling. 

Two new churches have been organized and buildings for worship have 
been erected for the same. This makes a total of twenty-seven churches in 
the Association. Several other church buildings have been improved, enlarged, 
painted and the grounds beautified. A desire for the esthetic is developing 
among the Indians. 

Two new Sunday schools have been organized, thus making a Sunday 
school in every church. Training courses have been held in important centers. 
An associational organization of the Sunday schools has monthly meetings and 
is doing efficient work under the leadership of J. L. Carter. Eight Vacation 
Bible Schools were held with great success. More were planned but were 
held up due to the polio conditions. 

Evangelism was stressed among the churches during the year. Every 
church had one or more revivals. The pastors often did their own preaching, 
but were sometimes assisted by other pastors. Outside help was secured in a 
few cases. In addition to the meetings, evangelism was stressed in the camps, 
Vacation Bible Schools and Training Courses. As a result nearly two hun- 
dred conversions were reported during the year. 

The Pastors' Conference meets monthly, with a planned program of timely 
topics for discussion. After the meeting refreshments are served. On three 
occasions they were favored with guest speakers : Rev. Ernest Grigg, returned 
missionary from India and now of Canada; Rev. G. G. Lanter of Winston- 
Salem and Dr. Walt N. Johnson of Salisbury. All of these brought inspiring 
messages which were appropriate for the occasion. Dr. Johnson also led a 
three-day institute for our preachers. 

The Woman's Missionary Union reports a good year, having made sub- 
stantial gains. An interesting development in connection with this work is 
the camp movement for boys and girls. Much interest has developed con- 
cerning the movement, and a committee has been appointed to study the situa- 
tion with a view of establishing an Associational Camping Ground. 

The Orphanage is managed and operated by the Indians. The Oldham 
Home for girls has been open for two years, and much of that time it has 
been filled to capacity, eight to ten. The expense of the home is largely taken 
care of by offerings from the church, coming either through special offerings 
in the Sunday schools or through the church budgets. Every church in the 
Association has made some contribution. Gifts from outside sources are wel- 
comed and greatly appreciated. A fund for the erection of a home for boys 
has begun and $2,022.34 has been raised for this purpose. 

Total collections for the year : 



Annual of Session 1944 93 

For local church expenses $21,866.43 

For local Orphanage 3,341.39 

For Missions 1,000.21 

For Hospital 348.50 

Total $26,556.53 

94. 

5. Cooperative Work with the General Baptist 
State Convention 
C. E. Griffin continues as the General Secretary of the Negro Baptist Con- 
vention in the State. It is a joy to the General Board to be in a position to 
aid our Negro brethren in this way, and we rejoice in the progress they are 
making. We enter here the report for the year ending September 30, 1944 as 
presented by Secretary Griffin. 

A. Report of activities of the office of Brother J. F. Wertz, Director of 
Religious Education and Training : 

Sermons preached 84 

Lectures delivered 91 

Training Units organized 11 

Training Courses held 69 

Conferences held 37 

Conference Leaders 14 

Credits received 300 

Faculty members 14 

Enrollment 600 

Sunday School and B. T. U. Conventions 13 

Teacher Training Courses 8 

Vacation Bible Training Schools 23 

Institutes held 29 

Miles traveled 10,157 

Amount spent traveling $302.71 

Letters sent out 2,035 

Meals paid for 25 

B. Report of activities of Brother C. E. Griffin, Executive Secretary : 

Sermons preached 125 

Lectures delivered 191 

Ministers visited 726 

Miles traveled 21,261 

Amount spent traveling $639.83 

Amount spent for meals $ 47.44 

Number of letters sent out 35,247 

In submitting my report covering the past twelve months from October 1, 
1943 to September 30, 1944, I do so in a most humble and reverent spirit to 
our Heavenly Father who has been my constant and ever-present guide and 
strength. Therefore, first of all, I wish to acknowledge my profound grati- 
tude to God for His continued and abiding blessings and mercies granted unto 



94 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

me and the life and work of our Baptist people. Our people have been most 
kind and cooperative in all our work of which I am deeply grateful. 

During the past year our Lord has richly blessed our work in every field 
of endeavor. Every worker of our Convention has done a marvelous job in 
making this year perhaps the best year in the annuals of Baptist activity in 
this great State of ours. Our conventional " leaders have surpassed their 
own expectations. The spirit of harmony and cooperation in every area 
is most encouraging; the manifest interest on the part of our entire constit- 
uency is unusually high ; and the financial contributions given reached a new 
peak. As a result of this almost phenominal growth, we come at the close of 
this fiscal year without a single liability. Thus I am grateful to report that 
we close the year with all our obligations paid in full. This applies to both 
our conventional expenses and to our objectives. 

Associational Pastors' Conferences 

Perhaps one of the contributive factors toward our growth was the pro- 
motion of our Pastors' Conferences promoted in our Associations held this 
year beginning in March and going through June and part of July. After 
our Executive Committee had approved the resuming of these conferences for 
this year, plans were set forth and conferences were held in every association 
for Pastors and leaders with only a very few exceptions. Out of 56 associa- 
tions conferences were held in 53 of them. These conferences turned out to 
be more than small groups who resided close by attending them. Each modera- 
tor cooperated to the extent that his entire association was called and a full 
day was spent in heart-to-heart talks >about our state program. Obviously the 
value of such contacts as these conferences afforded are inestimable. Too 
much thanks and praise cannot be given to the moderators, Pastors, and 
workers in these associations for such splendid cooperation in making these 
conferences possible. 

Our Baptist Headquarters 

Another contributive factor to the progress of our work no doubt is the 
Baptist Headquarters in Raleigh on the campus of Shaw University. The 
Headquarters is fastly becoming the center of Baptist activity. Our con- 
stituency is beginning to look toward the Headquarters as standing for a 
symbol of Baptist interest and achievements. It is looked upon as a symbol 
of Baptist unity. Many Baptists attending to the work of the denomination 
or attending to the affairs for their own local church have passed through the 
portals of our Headquarters during these twelve months. Certainly this sym- 
bol has gone a long ways in further and more completely cementing the spirit 
of unification of all Baptist activity in North Carolina for Baptists in every 
area, "nook and corner" of the state are working together as never before. 
Nearly every association attended by us this year made new and special reso- 
lutions to adopt the program of our General Baptist Convention as their re- 
spective program. Churches visited were found reorganizing their own local 
program to inculcate the program of their state denominational Program This 
is indeed gratifying and encouraging. 

Another outstanding event was the Annual Minister's Conference and Insti- 
tute. Each year it is a part of our program to cooperate with Shaw University 



Annual of Session 1944 95 

in holding an Annual Minister's Conference and Institute combined with the 
Woman's Missionary Conference, Sunday School and Baptist Training Union 
Conference. It was held at Shaw University, from June 12th to June 16th, 
1944. This was a very fine conference. Over 500 were in attendance. Also, 
Minister's Institutes were held in 21 centers involving 27 courses for an ag- 
gregate period of instruction of 47 weeks. 

One of the great contributing factors is surely found in the fact of the 
constant, and, I hope, ever abiding, spirit of cooperation existing between our 
friends — all of them, of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and 
us. This spirit of cooperation cannot be estimated in terms of dollars and 
cents for it is far deeper and more significant than that. Personally, I have 
received untold value in the contacts made at your annual conventions as well 
as contacts made throughout the year over the state in various ways. For 
instance the service rendered by Mr. Morgan and the other workers at our 
State Sunday School arid Baptist Training Union Conventions in Raleigh this 
years is beyond value. Our people believe in the leadership of the Baptist 
State Convention. May our Heavenly Father continue to bless this relationship. 
The Negro Baptists of North Carolina join me in giving thanks for your 
support to our work. 

95. 

6. Oteen Mission 

We continue, with some aid from other states, to support the work at Oteen, 
and Chaplain Ottis Hagler continues in that position. It will be remembered 
that this work has been very close to the Baptists of the Buncombe Associa- 
tion, and they likewise have continued their support. A brief report from 
Chaplain Hagler follows : 

There have been many changes at Oteen Hospital since our 
last Annual Report. The whole program for hospitalizing the 
tubercular veteran has been greatly accelerated and expanded. 
Renovation and remodeling of all buildings has been completed 
so that instead of caring for 850 patients our capacity is now 
1,260. As of this date we are caring for 1,095 patients. This 
number includes soldiers, sailors, marines, army and navy nurses, 
WACS, and WAVES. There are at present 570 veterans of 
World War II. It is expected that our capacity will be reached 
shortly and further expansion undertaken. 

On October 29, 1943 the present Chaplain, Ottis J. Hagler, was 
critically injured in an automobile accident. From that date until 
September 1st of the present year Willis Bennett, pastor of the 
Oteen Church, served as Alternate Chaplain. Chaplain Hagler 
slowly improved and returned to part-time duty May 1, 1944, 
conducting the worship services and doing some visitation. On 
July 1st he assumed duty once again as full-time Post Chaplain. 

During the year 2,130 patients have been received. Each of 
these was visited by the Chaplain on the Receiving Ward. All 
patients are classified according to denominational affiliation or 
preference. Forty-five per cent are Baptist. About eleven per 
~°nt are Catholic and a full-time Catholic Chaplain is provided. 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Worship services are conducted in the Chapel for ambulatory 
patients and broadcast throughout the hospital for bed-patients. 
Devotional literature, Bibles, and Testaments are distributed by 
the Chaplain. This material is supplied by the various denomina- 
tional publishing houses and the American Bible Society. A pro- 
gram of regular visitation is carried on. Special attention is 
given the Receiving Ward and Surgery. The critically ill pa- 
tients have a priority on the Chaplain's time. The Chaplain is 
on call 24 hours a day and is available to all. 

We remember the words of Jesus "I was sick and ye visited 
me." The work of the Chaplain is made possible by the coopera- 
tive support of the Veterans' Administration, Buncombe Associa- 
tion, and the State Mission Program of the various Conventions. 

Pray for Oteen and the men and women who have given their 
health in service of country! 



96. 



7. Sanatorium^ 
We present a brief report from Pastor E. M. Harris of Aberdeen, who 
continues his work with the sick at the State Sanatorium and with the girls 
at Samarcand. Last year we presented a report from our representative at the 
Western North Carolina Sanatorium at Black Mountain, J. N. Watson, who 
was also pastor of the Black Mountain Church. He did an excellent work 
there, but resigned in April to accept the pastorate at Marshville Church. For 
some months we were without a representative there. H. W. Baucom, Sr., 
has now become the pastor of the Black Mountain Church, and has become 
the representative of the Board at Western North Carolina Sanatorium. With 
his past rich experience in this field we can count on him to provide a most 
helpful service to the sick at the sanatorium. 
Brother Harris sends us the following : 

There is possibly no phase of a pastor's work that is more 
appreciated than his ministry to the sick. There are about six 
hundred and fifty patients at the North Carolina Sanatorium — 
men, women and children of all ages, who come from all sections 
of the State. Some have been there for years and others for 
just a few weeks, not long enough to get over their homesickness. 
To most of them a visit from a pastor, an encouraging word, or 
a brief prayer means much. 

In our efforts to bring a little sunshine into their lonely lives 
we know no denominational lines. However, if we happen to 
know they are of our own faith and order we have a point of 
contact that is helpful. So you see if friends will be kind enough 
to send us a note or card and give us the name and church of 
which the individual is a member we may be able to render a 
more helpful service, and that in the early part of the patient's 
stay in the institution. With the scarcity of gas and tires loved 
ones and friends do not visit the Sanatorium as much as they did 
some years ago, which makes our ministry even more needed than 
before. Please let us know if you have a friend or loved one at 
the North Carolina Sanatorium. 



Annual of Session 1944 97 

97. 

8. Samarcand 
(From E. M. Harris) 

This year we have sent out twenty-six church letters to girls who have re- 
turned home or have been placed in Christian homes. Twenty-seven girls have 
been baptized upon a profession of faith. They have been given baptismal 
certificates and New Testaments. Lists of Baptist girls have been given to 
some Y. W. A. organizations who have remembered the Samarcand girls in 
one way or another. When you are instrumental in making a Samarcand girl 
feel that some one is interested in her and cares, it helps her to try harder. 
We have helped place some girls in good Christian homes, and so far as we 
know every one is making good. Mrs. Harris and I often hear from some of 
the girls who have gone out from Samarcand. In order to vary the report 
and give our Baptist people some little idea of one phase of our work, I 
shall quote a few lines from a letter or two, of course omitting places and 
names : 

"Dear Mr. Harris : I will write you to tell you how much I 
appreciate the services at Samarcand. I am getting along just 
fine now and I go to church every chance I get. It is a long ways 
from my home to church. I want you to know I sure do appre- 
ciate your services at Samarcand and I want you to remember 
me in prayer — I know you will'. So I am going to do the best I 
can and make a lady out of myself. From a girl who was once 
in Samarcand." 

I copy from another letter : 

"Dear Mr. Harris : Will drop you a few lines to let you know 
I still go to church. I want my church membership transferred 

to Baptist Church. Give Mrs. Harris my very best regards. 

I often think of you all. I can't thank you enough for what you 
have done for me. I appreciate it very much. I won't forget 
the 24th day of September." (The 24th day of September was 
the day she was baptized.) 

We have received similar letters from a number of the girls, and some from 
pastors saying they were greatly pleased with the attitude and faithfulness of 
the girls. Some have gone so far as to say their changed attitude has helped 
the home life from which they came. 

98. 

9. Report of Rural Church Committee 
(Garland A. Hendricks) 

The territory over which the work of the Southern Baptist Convention ex- 
tends includes 19 states and the District of Columbia, and embraces about 40 
per cent of the land area of the nation and about one-third of the population. 

Here about two-thirds of the Baptists of the world live. This is the Bap- 
tist stronghold of the world. We have about 5,000,000 white Baptists and 
about 4,000,000 Negro Baptists, while there are only about 11,000,000 Baptists 
in the United States and about 13,000,000 in the world. About 40 to 45 per 
cent of all church members in this region are Baptist. 



98 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The South is a rural region. In 1940 we had only 24 cities with a popula- 
tion of over 100,000 each. About one-half of the farm people of the nation 
live here. Approximately 25 per cent of the income is from agriculture, as 
compared with about 12 per cent for the nation. While we have fast changed 
from an agricultural nation living by an agricultural economy to an industrial 
nation living by a paper economy, the folks in the South still live closer to an 
agricultural economy than any others in America. 

About 70 per cent of the people of the South are native-born whites, about 
25 per cent are native-born Negroes, and only about 5 per cent are foreign. 
Here we have a desirable type of individual, who is steady and reliable. Here 
the birth rate exceeds that of any other region, and we provide the source of 
the nation's population supply. 

The rural South is rich in natural resources and in human wealth, but poor 
in technology, artificial wealth, and institutional services. So many of our best 
minds consider it necessary for us to become more efficient in turning our 
primary forms of wealth into artificial forms of wealth if we are to share in 
and benefit by the products and services of an industrial age. At the same time, 
it is necessary for us to conserve the values derived from living close to nature 
and in* association with large families. To conserve the higher values in a pe- 
riod of transition we shall have to keep a religious motivation in the hearts 
and a religious interpretation of life in the minds of our leaders and people. 

Herein is our great Baptist responsibility and opportunity. A religious 
denomination which has gained so large a following amongst the people is in 
a position to play an important part in shaping the destiny of the region. We 
must make a determining impact upon the new life-movement of the South 
with our Baptist principles, policies and programs. 

As we prepare to make this impact we must give consideration, emphasis, 
recognition, and stimulation to all groups and elements which make up our 
great denomination. We must be careful to observe fair play, to maintain 
wholesome balance, to look objectively at our difficulties and our opportunities. 
We should not turn our attention from any phase or aspect of our work, but 
to be at our best we must give due consideration to all of our work. 

Here are some facts about our Baptist churches in North Carolina : 80 
per cent of the churches are located in the open country or in villages, and 
about 60 per cent of all church members belong to these churches. 80 per 
cent of the churches have fewer than 300 members each, and more than half 
of all members are in these churches. By nature our denomination is pre- 
dominantly rural and small-church. In recent years we have tended to mini- 
mize the values contributed by and the importance of the work of the rural 
churches and the small churches. 

What about the condition of the churches? A study of the associational 
minutes of forty-five associations for 1941 reveals the following facts : 34 per 
cent of the rural and 80 per cent of the city churches reported mid-week 
prayer services. Churches reporting baptisms: rural, 71 per cent; city, 90 
per cent. Number of members per baptism : country, 24 ; village, 31 ; city, 29. 
82 per cent of the rural buildings are constructed of wood, but 69 per cent of 
the city buildings are constructed of brick or stone. 72 per cent of the value 
of all church property is accredited to the 20 per cent of the churches located 



Annual of Session 1944 . 99 

in the cities. Churches carrying insurance : rural, 24 per cent ; city 80 per 
cent. Churches owning pastor's homes : country, 4 per cent ; village, 22 per 
cent; city, 60 per cent. Average value of the pastor's homes: rural, $2,152.00; 
city, $5,734.00. Churches having full Training Union : country, 5 per cent ; 
village, 10 per cent; city, 34 per cent. Churches having full W. M. U. : coun- 
try, 4 per cent; village, 10 per cent; city, 43 per cent. Churches reporting 
Vacation Bible School: country, 15 per cent; village, 36 per cent; city, 50 per 
cent. Churches having Sunday School : rural, 97 per cent ; city 98 per cent. 
Average number of rooms in the buildings : country, 4 ; village, 9 ; city, 23. Per 
capita gifts: country, $3.55; village, $6.80; city, $11.24. 

By the nature of our region, by the location of our churches and church 
members, and by the condition of our churches one can readily see that the 
greatest field for denominational development is the rural church. But at the 
present time the personnel of our Convention boards and committees is made 
up of the pastors and lay members of a few large urban churches. These are 
good men and women, and many of them came from the country. But they 
are engaged in urban work, and think along urban lines. A study of the report 
of the 1942 Baptist State Convention Committee on Committees shows that the 
persons named by that Convention to places of leadership were of the follow- 
ing proportions : Town and city pastors, 67 per cent ; laymen, 19 per cent 
(most of them from the large churches) ; women, 7 per cent; retired or in- 
active persons, 5 per cent ; country and village pastors, 2 per cent. No coun- 
try preacher or layman has been President of the Baptist State Convention 
since the last term served by the late Rev. R. H. Marsh, who served from 1891 
to 1904. Very few rural pastors have preached Convention sermons or par- 
ticipated on Convention programs within the past quarter of a century. A 
few prominent persons serve in several different positions of responsibility, 
while the great masses of North Carolina Baptists are given little or no repre- 
sentation in Convention affairs. * 

In view of these facts about our region, our churches, and our Convention, 
we, the members of the Committee for Study of the Rural Churches, make the 
following recommendations to the Convention : 

First, that this Convention authorize the General Board and the General 
Secretary to employ a full-time rural field worker on the following conditions : 
The Convention shall cooperate with the Home Mission Board in working 
out plans and in financing the program, and that the worker be called with a 
view to a permanent program of rural work in cooperation with all agencies 
of the Convention. 

Second, that this Convention authorize the General Board to create a stand- 
ing Committee on Rural Work to work in co-operation with the rural worker 
and the General Secretary in an advisory capacity. 

99. 

10. Report of the Radio Committee 
(Carl M. Townsend, Chairman) 

Your Radio Committee cooperated with the Radio Committee of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention in broadcasting the Southwide Baptist Hour during 
January, February and March of this year. This program was broadcast over 
WPTF in Raleigh, WBIG in Greensboro and WSJS in Winston-Salem. 



100 N, C. Baptist State Convention 

During the next quarter special recordings of sermons by Dr. George W. 
Truett and Dr. M. E. Dodd were broadcast from several stations in North 
Carolina. 

We call attention to the current series of programs of the North Carolina 
Baptist Hour, broadcast each Sunday morning 8 :30-9 :00 A.M. This series, 
continuing through October, November and December, is broadcast from 
WPTF in Raleigh, WBIG in Greensboro, WSJS in Winston-Salem, and 
WSOC in Charlotte. The program on October 22nd was also broadcast from 
WWNC in Asheville. 

We wish to thank all of these Radio Stations for their splendid cooperation 
in broadcasting the North Carolina Baptist Hour, Southwide Baptist Hour, 
and the special recordings. 

We are delighted to express our sincere appreciation for the splendid work 
of the Radio Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention and express our 
sincere desire to continue to cooperate with the Committee as appointed by the 
Southern Baptist Convention. We believe there is a great opportunity imme- 
diately ahead for preaching the Gospel in the ever-widening and increasingly 
important field of radio. 

We are reminded of the forthcoming Southwide Baptist Hour for 1945 
which begins next January 7th. You are urged to acquaint your church with 
the hour, the speakers and the stations over which the programs may be heard. 
Pastors are requested to contact radio stations in your own communities in 
reference to broadcasting these special recorded sermons, including a new 
series by Dr. Ralph A. Herring of Winston-Salem, which may be secured 
through the Southwide Radio Committee in Ajtlanta, Georgia. 

The Committee is deeply grateful to all who have taken a part on the 
North Carolina programs and wishes to express to our General Secretary, Mr. 
M. A. Huggins, the genuine appreciation of the Committee for his wise coun- 
sel and helpfulness during the year. 

Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh, N. C. 

W. Wilbur Hutchins, High Point, N. C. 

Mrs. Glenn Lassiter, Raleigh, N. C. 

W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, N. C. 

George D. Heaton, Charlotte, N. C. 

L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, N. C. 

C. E. Parker, Winston- Salem, N. C. 



100. 

VII. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

We divide this report on Christian Education into two divisions : A, 
Christian Education in the Churches; B, Chrstian Education in the Colleges. 

A. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE CHURCHES 

We present here reports from Mr. Morgan, Mr. Gibson and Mr. Hower- 
ton. These reports will reveal the excellent progress that has been made 
in all these departments during the year. We believe the programs promoted 
by these departments have been richer and fuller than in any previous year. 



Annual of Session 1944 101 

101. 

1. Division of Sunday Schools 
L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

This is my ninth annual report as secretary, and my nineteenth year with 
the Convention. In spite of war conditions and many other things to he 
desired, I am more optimistic about the future of our Sunday School work 
than I ever have been. It is too early to tell about membership gains or 
losses, but that will be recorded in the Statistical Tables and Statistical 
Summary in the Convention Annual. 

We express sincere appreciation for our Associates in the work who have 
rendered excellent service throughout the year : Mr. and Mrs. John B. Lane, 
and Mrs. Myra Motley, Associate; Miss Joy Wood, Office Secretary; our 
approved and qualified workers : Mrs. L. R. O'Brian, Mrs. C. R. Hinton, 
Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. F. A. Bower, Mrs. Clyde Baucom, Mrs. L. L. Car- 
penter, Mrs. Harvey Gibson, and Mrs. Ford Burns. We are grateful for 
the continual help received from the Baptist Sunday School Board. The 
financial aid and the help of a fine field force makes it possible for us to 
increase greatly our work in North Carolina. Above all, we appreciate the 
continuous effort of Associational Officers, Pastors, Educational Directors, 
and the Officers and Teachers in local churches who faithfully work at the 
job through the years. No progress is possible except as it comes through 
the efforts of these good Soldiers of the Cross. 

We were fortunate to have Mrs. Myra Motley who came to us as a full- 
time Associate the first of June. She is rapidly making a place for herself 
in the hearts of our people. We regret to lose Mr. and Mrs. John Lane to 
South Carolina after eight years of faithful service. Mr. Lane is now Train- 
ing Union Secretary in South Carolina. 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

1. State Sunday School Convention : 

This meeting was held at the First Baptist Church, High Point, February 

1. 2, and 3 with an attendance of about 1,200. The program was of the 
highest order and our people were greatly helped. Our next Convention 
will be held at the First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, February 6, 7, and 
8, 1945. 

2. Associational Officers and Conferences: 

April 4 at the First Baptist Church, Sanford, and April 6 at the First 
Baptist Church, Hickory, our Associational Officers met for a day of Train- 
ing and Planning. Most of the Associations were represented and much 
good was accomplished. Mr. J. N. Barnette, Mr. W. P. Phillips, Mrs. H. M. 
Wynn, and Miss Mary Alice Biby were with us from Nashville. 

3. Ridgccrest Assembly: 

Interest in Ridgecrest has increased so much that two weeks were given 
to Sunday School work. July 5-19 hundreds of our North Carolina leaders 
had fellowship and inspiration with leaders from every state in the South. 
The program was one of the best, and our people were greatly inspired- 



102 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

4. Better Bible Teaching Clinics: 

Our Department joined with the Sunday School Departments of Ala- 
bama, Georgia, and South Carolina in promoting the Baptist Clinic on Bible 
Teaching at La Grange, Georgia in 1942, at Atlanta, Georgia in 1943, and 
at Charlotte, North Carolina this year. In Charlotte, we had an average 
attendance of 630 and reached more than 1,000 different people. We believe 
this type of Clinic is the answer to the need of better teaching in our Sun- 
day Schools. By the first of December we will have completed this year 
seven of these Association-wide Better Teaching Clinics in North Carolina, 
and will have touched more than 4,000 of our leaders with this vital program. 

5. Enlargement Campaigns: 

Our aim at the beginning of this year was to conduct six Association- 
wide Enlargement Campaigns. Despite the fact that war conditions have 
been most serious and our State has had a serious epidemic of polio we 
have succeeded in conducting five of the Campaigns. One had to be can- 
celled entirely and two others were greatly reduced in the number of 
churches cooperating. The chart on page 37 shows some of the results of 
our efforts. We used the largest number of summer workers we have had 
in several years, and they were the best to be found in the South. You 
will join us in expressing sincere thanks to all who assisted us through 
the year. 

6. Vacation Bible Schools: 

Until the fifteenth of June, we had the best prospects for a good year in 
Vacation School work we have ever had, but like a storm, an epidemic of 
polio struck our State and most of the boys and girls were placed under 
quarantine for the remainder of the summer. So far we have received 495 
reports but they are not all in. We express appreciation to our Associational 
Missionaries for their faithful work in conducting a big percentage of the 
schools. 

7. Training Awards: 

The polio epidemic during the summer greatly reduced our Training 
work, but we are happy to report that 7,501 awards have been issued from 
October 1, 1943 to October 1, 1944. This is only 218 less than we reported 
last year. 

8. Looking Ahead: 

1. January 18 and 19, the Sunday School Board forces will join us in 
conducting two Associational Officers Conferences in preparation for the 
celebration of our Centennial year in every Association in our State and 
Southland, March 6. 

2. Our State Sunday School Convention will be held at the First Baptist 
Church, Winston-Salem, February 6, 7, and 8, 1945. Dr. G. S. Dobbins and 
others will be with us for this meeting. 

3. The weeks of June 28-July 4 and July 5-11 have been selected for 
Sunday School work at Ridgecrest. We hope to have 800 of our leaders 
there. ' Plan now to go. 



Annual of Session 1944 



103 



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104 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

4. Already we are planning for six Association-wide Enlargement Cam- 
paigns and six Association-wide Better Bible Teaching Clinics. 

9. Our Goals: 

1. Teacher Training in 1,200 churches. 

2. Ten Thousand Training Awards. 

3. Special Emphasis upon local Training during April and October. 

4. One hundred Standard Sunday Schools. 

5. Special Emphasis upon Denominational Days in the Sunday School. 

6. A five per cent increase in Sunday School Enrollment. 

7. Emphasis upon Teaching for Christian Living. 

8. Seven hundred Vacation Bible Schols. 



102. 



2. Training Union Division 
Harvey T. Gibson, Director 



PERSONNEL 

In another part of this report Secretary Huggins has called attention to 
several personnel changes in the Training Union Division. We do not need 
to reiterate those changes. However, a word of appreciation needs to be 
said concerning the excellent work done by Miss Margaret Sparks during 
the past year or two from the time of the resignation of Nathan C. Brooks, 
Jr., until after the coming of Mr. Gibson. During this period she was a 
tremendous assistance to Mr. Hutchins and also to Mr. Gibson in that she 
carried a large responsibility for the promotion of the work. 

Miss Mary Lou Wall has served the Department as office secretary for 
eight years. Her faithfulness and efficiency, and her knowledge of the many 
details of the state training program have been a real contribution to the 
growth of the work. 

During the summer months the Department was assisted by a number of 
college and seminary students and school teachers. They were as follows : 
Mary Cox, Juanita Davis, Helen Knott, Martha Jane Mitchell, L. J. New- 
ton, Jr., Nora Padgett, Arlene Parnell, James Pegram. Celeste Porter, Cletus 
Speagle, Martha Stroupe, Emma Julia Wallace, and Eleanor White. These 
young people did splendid work for churches in which they labored and 
they did it at a financial sacrifice because they are interested in our Baptist 
program. The chart on page 41 (Training Union Chart No. 1) is a partial 
picture of the work they did. 

SOME ACHIEVEMENTS IN 1944 

In spite of unsettled conditions due to war, the necessary break in work 
resulting from a change of personnel, and the poliomyelitis ban on meetings 
for the younger people, Training Union work has progressed and some 
notable results have been achieved : 

1. An Associational Enlargement Campaign was sponsored in the South 
Fork Association in April with sixteen churches participating. 

2. Thirteen churches were reached in the Caldwell Association in two 
weeks of work by summer workers and the State Department. 

3. Nineteen churches were reached in a similar way in the Haywood 
Association. 



Annual of Session 1944 105 

4. Seven churches were aided in enlargement efforts in the Liberty, Hay- 
wood, Pilot Mountain, Transylvania, and Wilmington Associations. 

5. In addition to the above work study courses were conducted by state 
field workers in nineteen churches representing sixteen associations. 

6. Ten Regional Conventions were held in the spring with a total regis- 
tration of 1,964. 

7. Twelve hundred and ninety-seven persons registered for the State 
Assembly at Ridgecrest and more than 500 North Carolinians attended the 
three Southwide Training Union Conferences there. This means that ap- 
proximately 1,800 persons were reached by the Training Union meetings at 
Ridgecrest. 

8. Miss Paschall, Miss Sparks, Mr. Mobley, and Mr. Gibson each served 
for two weeks on the faculty at the Southwide Training Union Leadership 
Assembly at Ridgecrest during the summer. 

9. During the Ridgecrest conferences two hundred and three North Car- 
olina boys and girls made the commitment to full-time religious service. 
Many of them are now training themselves in our colleges and seminaries. 

10. Another phase of the State program promoted by the Department was 
the Simultaneous Associational Mass Meetings on November 23, 1943. Fifty- 
two associations participated and 5,716 people attended these meetings. 

11. Associational officers were brought together in one of two Training 
Meetings in the State — one at Tabernacle Church, Raleigh, and the other at 
Western Avenue Church, Statesville — to plan for the November 23rd Mass 
Meeting. These meetings were under the leadership of the Southwide 
Training Union force. Forty-one associations were represented. 

12. The chart on page 41 (Training Union Chart No. 1) gives a picture 
of the work done in the Enlargement Campaigns, and the chart on page 42 
(Training Union Chart No. 2) is a picture of Training Union organizations 
in the State as reported through the office in Raleigh. It should be explained 
here that a partial loss in units, directors, and churches having Training 
Union work is due to the fact that we adopted the policy last year of dis- 
carding from our files records of churches from which we have had no 
report in three years. It is important, then, that we have at least one 
report each year from every church with a Training Union in order that 
we may have up-to-date information for the Convention report. Actually 
eighty churches that had no training work at all have added Training 
Union work since the last Convention report, but many churches have made 
no report to us within the past three years and that explains why we must 
show a net loss in churches with Training Union work, units, etc. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

We face the future with faith and enthusiasm. North Carolina churches 
on the whole offer a friendly atmosphere for our training program. Our 
consecrated and devoted pastors are recognizing in an increasing measure 
the need for better-trained church membership and are making use of 
the Training Union, the "People's Seminary," to meet the needs of their 
people. 

There is an urgent need that our training organization take a positive 



106 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

stand in regard to the sale and use of alcoholic beverages, Sunday amuse- 
ments that draw so many of our people away from church, and the whole 
matter of juvenile delinquency. 

Faced with the prospect of thousands of returning service men, broken in 
body and spirit, it is imperative that we revitalize our church program to 
meet their needs, challenge them to a greater sphere of service, and make 
use of the rich experiences and talents which they will bring to us. 

The war and defense centers have made a heavy drain on the personnel 
of our Young People's Departments all over the State, but there are many 
young people still left in our churches and we should rally them to the 
training program in order that there be no gap between Intermediates and 
Adults. 

There is an ever increasing and urgent need also that we develop a train- 
ing program that will furnish leadership for the younger people in our 
Training Unions, train teachers and officers for the Sunday School and 
other church organizations, and create in the hearts and minds of our church 
membership a new sense of responsibility to their church. 

SOME GOALS FOR 1945 

1. Every association represented at one of the two Training Meetings for 
associational officers: Tabernacle Church, Raleigh, February 20; Calvary 
Church, Morganton, February 22. 

2. Eight thousand present at the 'Simultaneous Associational Training 
Union Rallies on April 24. 

3. Seventy-five new churches with Training Unions. 

4. Sixty thousand Baptists in North Carolina Training Unions. 

5. Twenty thousand study course awards for 1945. 

6. Fifteen hundred registered at the State Training Union Assembly, 
Ridgecrest, June 21-27. 

7. Six weeks of associational enlargement work. 

IN APPRECIATION 

The Training Union Department wishes to express its deepest apprecia- 
tion to the hundreds of sympathetic and cooperative pastors, educational 
directors, associational missionaries and workers, and local Training Union 
officers who have promoted the training program in the State. It is like- 
wise grateful to Secretary M. A. Huggins for his unqualified support of the 
Department and to Dr. T. L. Holcomb, Mr. J. E. Lambdin, and others of 
the Sunday School Board for their generous help in carrying on the work 
in North Carolina. We want to thank also the many pastors, teachers, and 
others who have assisted in putting on enlargement campaigns and without 
whom the program of training could not have been promoted. The faculty 
of the Ridgecrest Assembly was made up almost entirely of North Carolina 
ministers and religious leaders whose contribution to the Baptist people in 
attendance was of inestimable value. They have our gratitude. 

Your State Baptist Training Union Department is anxious to serve the 
churches of the State and wants to be used to promote a real Christian 
training program. We ask your prayers for the success of the work over 
the entire State, as well as in your church and association. 



Annual of Session 1944 



107 



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108 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 
TRAINING UNION CHART NO. 2 



Associations 



Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Atlantic 

Avery 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Blue Ridge 

Brier Creek 

Brunswick 

Brushy Mountain. 

Buncombe 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Central 

Chowan 

Columbus 

Dock 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Gaston County 

Green River 

Haywood 

Johnston 

Kings Mountain.. 

Liberty 

Little River 

Macon County 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mount Zion 

Neuse 

New Found 

New South River. 

Pee Dee 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Raleigh 

Randolph 

Roanoke 

Robeson 

Rowan 

Sandy Creek 

Sandy Run 

South Fork 

South Mountain.. 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain.. 

Stony Fork 

Surry 

Tar River 

Tennessee River.. 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Tuckaseigee 

Union 

West Chowan 

West liberty 

Western N. C 

Wilmington 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Burnt Swamp 

Cherokee 



Totals. 



Churches 



Units 



With 
T. U. 



7 
2 
1 

3 

9 

2 

8 

6 

13 



4 

5 

43 

18 

25 

21 

20 

IS 

14 

8 

2 

17 

2 

5 

9 

35 

6 

25 

22 

35 

19 

14 

12 

29 

4 

6 

34 

8 



15 

7 

42 

23 

27 

13 

23 

24 

18 

14 

29 

24 

6 

14 

11 





14 

10 

5 

7 

7 

9 

9 

23 



3 

19 
1 

11 
6 
1 



923 



With 

Direc 

tors 



5 
11 



4 

4 
38 
16 
22 
21 
16 
14 
11 

8 

1 
15 

2 

4 

8 
35 

5 
23 
17 
33 
18 
14 
10 
28 

3 

6 
33 

7 


15 

5 
40 
21 
26 
13 
20 
24 
18 
12 
27 
23 

6 
14 
11 




14 
10 

4 

r- 

6 

7 
8 

21 



3 
18 

1 
10 

6 

1 



Story 
Hour 



Junior 



4 




2 

2 
1 
8 

2 
1 

18 
14 
12 
9 
14 
3 
2 
1 
1 

11 

1 
1 
26 
5 

17 
5 
9 
10 
7 
3 

19 
1 
3 

13 
2 

4 
3 
23 
8 
11 
10 
11 
13 
11 
2 
12 
22 
2 
12 
8 


3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
6 
2 
13 

2 
12 

5 
3 




854 I 434 



5 
1 

1 

6 

1 

7 

2 

15 



4 

1 

29 

19 

22 

13 

17 

7 

5 

5 

1 

16 

2 

2 

5 

41 

5 

25 

13 

22 

20 

10 

11 

29 

4 

5 

23 

5 



10 

3 

34 

15 

17 

10 

16 

25 

15 

■ 9 

16 

26 

4 

14 

9 





7 

7 

4 

4 

3 

5 

4 

21 



3 

15 

1 

8 

1 





Inter- 
medi- 
ate 



5 


1 
6 

6 
2 
13 

3 
3 

27 

16 

20 

16 

17 

12 

6 

6 

1 

14 

1 

5 

4 

39 

5 

24 

14 

19 

17 

10 

11 

22 

3 

6 

25 

7 



9 

3 

33 

14 

16 

7 

16 

19 

18 

7 
17 

27 
2 

13 

10 


6 
7 
2 
4 
2 
6 
3 

22 

4 

12 


10 
2 




Young 
People 



4 

2 



2 

9 

1 

5 

4 

9 



3 

1 

23 

13 

18 

16 

10 

16 

6 

1 

1 

9 

1 

4 

16 

24 

4 

14 

9 

14 

13 

10 

10 

22 

5 

4 

19 

1 



9 

5 

31 

12 

15 

6 

18 

13 

11 

7 

13 

19 

3 

9 

7 





5 

5 

4 

5 

4 

6 

5 

9 



3 

13 

7 
2 




Adult 



6 
1 

1 

4 


5 
2 
9 

1 
2 

29 
21 
19 
15 
14 
7 
4 
2 
1 

12 
1 
3 
4 
27 
5 

20 

7 

11 

11 

9 

7 

20 

2 

6 

19 

2 



6 

2 

26 

15 

11 

11 

6 

11 

10 

6 

10 

27 

2 

11 

10 





7 

2 

2 

4 

2 

5 

2 

13 



1 

8 

2 

6 

1 

1 



Total 
Num- 
ber 
Units 



24 
4 


5 
27 

2 
25 
11 
54 


13 

8 
126 
83 
91 
69 
72 
45 
23 
15 

5 
62 

5 

15 
30 
157 
24 
100 
48 
75 
71 
46 
42 
112 
15 
24 
99 
17 


38 
16 
147 
64 
70 
44 
67 
81 
65 
31 
68 
121 
13 
59 
44 




28 
23 
14 
20 
13 
28 
16 
78 


13 
60 

3 
36 

9 

1 



Net Gain 
or Loss 
in Lnits 



705 677 569 I 529 2,914 



Loss 1 
Gain 1 
Loss 5 
Gain 2 
Gain 10 
Loss 1 
Gain 5 
Loss 5 
Loss 21 
Loss 10 
Loss 3 
Loss 5 
Loss 9 
Loss 32 
Gain 13 
Loss 5 
Loss 9 
Loss 3 
Loss 13 
Gain 4 

Same 
Loss 23 

Same 
Loss 5 
Gain 3 
Loss 20 
Loss 9 
Gain 43 
Gain 5 
Loss 15 
Loss 20 
Loss 6 
Gain 2 
Loss 21 
Loss 1 
Loss 1 1 
Loss 9 
Gain 2 
Loss 1 
Loss 11 
Loss 7 
Gain 8 
Loss 37 
Loss 23 
Loss 15 
Loss 11 
Less 4 
Gain 5 
Loss 9 
Gain 2 
Gain 9 
Loss 19 
Loss 12 
Gain 8 
Loss 1 
Loss 7 
Gain 9 
Loss 14 
Gain 2 
Loss 27 
Loss 6 
Gain 2 
Loss 8 
Loss 4 

Same 
Loss 4 
Gain 6 
Loss 15 

Same 
Loss 2 
Loss 1 



Net Loss 14,981 
359 



Annual of Session 1944 109 

103. 

3. Division of Student Work 
R. T. Howerton, Jr., Secretary 
Personnel 

Miss Laura Durant began her work as Baptist Student Secretary at the 
Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in September, after 
a summer of intensive Bible study at one of the nation's leading theological 
seminaries. Miss Durant is exceptionally qualified for her work. She has 
unlimited enthusiasm. Her consecration to the cause of Christ is sincere 
and contagious, and her dealings with students are firm and challenging. 
Already she has won the loyalty of hundreds of students. The B.S.U. coun- 
cil is enthusiastic in their praise of their new leader. 

The loss the student division sustained when Mrs. John E. Lawrence left 
Greensboro to become assistant to Dr. Broadus Jones of the First Baptist 
Church, Raleigh, was a great one. The three and one-half years she in- 
vested in students' lives were years of the highest Christian service. Seed 
she has sown will continue to bear fruit. 

Another inestimable loss occurred when Miss Cleo Mitchell decided to 
become Mrs. R. H. Edwin Espy. Her husband is the national Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. secretary. Mrs. Espy invested many years as student secretary 
at Woman's College where her maiden name became synonymous with the 
best in student work. Her year of teaching and student work at Meredith 
was exceptionally fruitful. No one has yet been secured to direct student 
work at Meredith, although the council is carrying on most effectively. 

Miss Marjorie Toole, graduate of Woman's Missionary Training School 
in Louisville, succeeded the highly successful Miss Louise Green as student 
secretary at Appalachian State Teacher's College. Miss Toole, like Miss 
Durant, has already won the hearts of countless students of the campus at 
Boone and is leading the students in a program of dynamic Christian living. 

At East Carolina Teacher's College Miss Mary Lee Ernest continues her 
sympathetic and thorough leadership. The longer she remains at Green- 
ville, the more students and town folk admire and love her — and they began 
on a large scale when she first went there. The council is staffed with some 
of the best leaders in college. The student center is constantly alive with 
business meetings, worship services, private conferences and informal suppers. 

In November Miss Judith Joyner will take up her duties as part-time 
student secretary at the University of North Carolina. She will work in 
close connection with the Baptist Church of Chapel Hill and its pastor, Dr. 
Kelley Barnett. Miss Joyner has studied at the Training School in Louis- 
ville and last summer served as Educational Director of the First Baptist 
Church of Statesville. She faces her task with the deepest conviction that 
the student's greatest need is a vital relationship with Christ. 

Mr. Harold Townsend, divinity student at Duke University, continues 
his fine leadership of Baptist students on his campus. There as at Chapel 
Hill, also, the program is seriously hindered by the rapid turnover of men 
in the armed services' tightly scheduled training program. 

In the office of the student division Miss Adelaide Charles has completed 
a year of service as secretary. Because of her deep interest in the work 



110 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

and her friendliness toward students her helpful influence is felt on all of 
the campuses by students who write or come to her for aid. 

ACHIEVEMENTS DURING 1943-44 

1. On. the Campuses 

There are at present 22 active Baptist Student Unions. Please notice the 
B.S.U. Directory Chart on page. 46. 

What does the Baptist Student Union seek to accomplish on its campus? 
The skeleton of an answer can be found by examining the Calendar of 
Events followed out last year, at East Carolina Teachers' College, for 
example. 

REGULAR ACTIVITIES 

Sunday School Classes, Training Unions, Worship Services on Sundays. 
Bible Study Group each Friday afternoon at Student Center. "Pause for 
Power," a prayer meeting, each Thursday. Fellowship Hour, each Satur- 
day night. Bag Suppers, Sunday nights at Student Center. B.S.U. Council 
Meeting, each Monday night. Y.W.A. once every month. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

September 25, 26 — Pre-School Planning Retreat. 

September 28-October 1 — Open House at Student Center. 

September 28-October 1 — Enlistment Campaign. 

October 4 — Meeting of Greater B.S.U. Council. 

October 4-8 — The Baptist Student Magazine Campaign. 

October 10 — Student Join-the-Church-Day. 

October 14 — General Y.W.A. Meeting. 

October 15-18 — Visit to campus by Miss Katherine Abee and missionary, 
for study and training in missions. 

October 18-23— Christian Stewardship for Students Drive. 

October 19-21 — B.S.U. participates in campus-wide religious emphasis 
week. 

October 22-24 — Students attend annual B.S.U. Convention in Winston- 
Salem. 

October 25 — Baptist Training Union Study Course. 

November 1 — Meeting of Greater B.S.U. Council. 

November 13 — Party for all Baptist students. 

November 18 — B.S.U. play at college vespers. 

November 29-December 3 — Week of Prayer for Foreign Missions. 

December 26 — Student Night at Christmas, observed at home. 

January 5-8 — Enlistment of new Baptist students, new quarter. 

January 9-16 — Annual "Week of Deeper Spiritual Thinking," conferences 
and preaching by Rev. Nathan Broks. "Student Evangelistic Week" 
observed simultaneously. 

February 7-11 — Christian Home Week. 

March 6-10 — Home Mission Emphasis Week. 

April 3 — Canvass of students for summer volunteer work. 

April 15 — Newly elected council attends training retreat at Wake Forest. 

April 29 — Installation Service and Party for new council. 

May 5 — Entertainment for High School Seniors and College Seniors'. 



Annual of Session 1944 111 

Each campus B.S.U. council plans a similar program for the college year. 
While some of them are not as full as the above program, all B.S.U's strive 
for the highest goals of campus Christian living. 

The service Baptist Student Union work renders the denomination in 
recruiting and training students for life-time Christian work is invaluable. 
There are on file in the Raleigh Student Office the Christian Life Service 
Commitment cards of thirty-three young men and women who have definitely 
consecrated their lives to full-time Christian service. This does not include 
all. There are, of course, hundreds of others who were not on hand to 
register when these cards were distributed at Ridgecrest in June of 1944. 
The ministers, missionaries, educational directors, Bible teachers of tomor- 
row are in our colleges today. Baptist Student Unions offer them a match- 
less opportunity to develop their best for the highest service. Hundreds 
of them are taking advantage of it. 

For the figures on the enlistment of Baptist students in at least one 
religious activity at college, notice the Baptist Student Union Chart No. 2. 

2. In the Statewide Program 

Student Night at Christmas, now a traditional observance among Southern 
Baptists, was more widely practiced than ever before in North Carolina. 
Numerous reports of the helpful programs in which students at home from 
college participated were mailed to the student office. 

The January Presidents' Planning Conference was held in the First Baptist 
Church of Durham. The church people cordiall}' opened their homes to the 
students. Thirty-five attended the meetings, including the state officers and 
student secretaries. Techniques of student work and plans for the spring 
were made. 

The Annual Spring Retreats were held in April, the Eastern at Wake For- 
est on one week-end, with one hundred twenty-five new council members at- 
tending, and the Western at Mars Hill, with eighty-five attending. Officers 
were trained in their duties, following up training they had received on the 
campuses. There was a splendid spirit at both meetings and the hospitality 
of both college families was sincerely appreciated. 

The Annual All-Southern Baptist Student Conference at Ridgecrest was 
held in June. North Carolinians were the most numerous in attendance on 
a percentage basis. On a numerical basis we were second only to Texas, 
which in all fairness should be considered a territory, not a state. North 
Carolina registered one hundred and thirty-five, Texas about one hundred 
ninety. The grand total was 1,415, a figure that attests the spiritual enthu- 
siasm and faith of youth in a day when faith, hope and love are difficult to 
possess. 

The State Officers are listed below. They are a gifted, courageous and 
capable group, and are supplying a dynamic leadership on their campuses 
and over the state. 

President — Calvin Knight (Wake Forest). 

Enlistment Vice-President — Una Lee Richardson (A. S. T. C). 

Social Vice-President — Elizabeth Shelton (Meredith). 

Devotional Vice-President — Jane Carroll (W. C. U. N. C). 



112 



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Annual of Session 1944 



113 



Baptist Student Union Chart No. 2 
(Enlistment of Baptist students in at least one religious organization, 1943-44.) 



College 


Total 
Baptists 


Number 
Enlisted 


Percent 
Enlisted 


A.S.T.C 

Baptist Hospital 

Campbell 

Duke 


145 

70 
235 
375 
337 
130 

63 
640 
314 

45 
241 

60 
469 


110 
70 

235 

75 

174 

120 

640 

279 
45 

150 
60 

130 


75% 
100% 
100% 

25% 


E.C.T.C 

Gardner-Webb 

Lenoir-Rhyne 


52% 
92% 
75% 


Mars Hill 

Meredith 


100% 

85% 


Pembroke 

Wake Forest 

Wingate 

W.C.U.N.C 


100% 

62% 

100% 

28% 


Total 


3,124 


2,088 


63^% 



Secretary-Treasurer — Florence Gordon (W. C. U. N. C). 

Baptist Student Magazine Promoter- — Pfc. Jim Satterwhite (Bowman Gray 
Medical School). 

Music Director — Elizabeth White (Atlantic Christian). 

Summer Christian Youth Weeks were sponsored by the student division. 
For the first time the leaders were all young people of college age. Six 
churches came in on the plan. The leaders were Mr. Ralph Langley (Baylor 
University), the evening preacher; Mr. Bruce Mclver (Mars Hill College), 
the morning preacher; Miss Elizabeht Shelton (Meredith College), recreation 
and morning worship leader; Miss Florence Gordon (W. C. U. N. C), 
evening worship leader. All of the leaders visited in the afternoon in the 
interest of winning young people to Christ and strengthening their church 
loyalty. In spite of the polio bans the youth weeks were successful in every 
case. They were held in the following churches : First, Oxford, N. C, Rev. 
M. L. Bannister; First, Statesville, Rev. Harry Gamble; First, Thomasville, 
Dr. W. K. McGee; First, Dunn, Rev. Lewis Morgan; Wallace Baptist 
Church, Rev. J. N. Evans ; First, Mount Airy, Dr. R. K. Redwine. Next 
summer there will be more than one team and more than six weeks of work. 

First Magnitude, a standard of rigid requirements, the attainment of which 
denotes genuine merit, was reached by Meredith College and Wingate Col- 
lege. Mars Hill, E. C. T. C. and Campbell Colleges almost reached the 
goal. This fall a new standard even more difficult to attain has been sent 
out over the South. Already many of our campuses have adopted it as 
their goal and no doubt the greater challenge will bring forth a greater effort. 



104. 



B. Christian Education in the Colleges 



We record here brief reports from the colleges, and in this connection we 
call attention to the report of the Council on Christian Education. It is very 



114 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

gratifying to observe that the enrollment at Meredith College is larger than 
ever before, and President Kitchin of Wake Forest reports the largest fresh- 
man class in the history of the college, and all this in spite of the situation 
existing because of war. The reports from the colleges, together with some 
statistical data, follow. If one desires to discover the main facts about our 
educational institutions he can find them here. The auditor's detailed reports 
of the colleges are on file in the office of the General Secretary in Raleigh. 

105. 

(a) CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

B. F. McLeod, President of Board of Trustees 
L. H. Campbell, President 

In 1943-44 Campbell's enrollment of 316 probably reached its wartime low. 
Up to the present this year the over-all registration is 333. Lack of dormitory 
space for girls caused many applicants to be turned away. The last checkup 
since the opening revealed that there were one hundred forty-one girls crowded 
into fifty-five available rooms, some of which are located off the girls' section 
of the campus. 

It is a source of satisfaction now to realize that the institution could so 
adjust itself to the wartime emergency that without aid of government sub- 
sidies or contracts no operating deficit was incurred. Furthermore, in spite 
of increased cost of living expenses, student charges have remained approxi- 
mately constant throughout. 

As with most other institutions rather large inroads have been made upon 
faculty personnel during the past two years. In spite of the serious teacher 
shortage everywhere, the institution is fortunate this year in securing the fol- 
lowing new members for the position designated : R. L. Whipple, formerly 
teacher and counselor at Georgia Military Academy, Vice-President ; G. A. 
Tripp, previously Principal of Long Creek Grady High School, social science; 
J. W. Wray, from State College faculty, head of mathematics department and 
physics ; Mrs. G. T. Proffit, formerly from Dunn High School, head of natural 
science department ; Lucile Nelson, former head of voice department of Wes- 
leyan College, voice ; Minnie Drake Townsend, from Lander College, business 
education: H. M. Baker, natural science; Lillian Maxfield, from Brevard Col- 
lege, librarian. 

By unanimous vote the Board of Trustees committed the institution to an 
effort to raise as a minimum $300,000 for improvement and expansion. In 
addition to the renovation of some of the older buildings, a primary need is 
for additional dormitory space to house approximately one hundred fifty addi- 
tional students. Other urgent building needs include an infirmary, a modern 
physical education building, a vocational education laboratory, and an addition 
to the Carrie Rich Library. Already good progress has been made in com- 
munities near the college. 

While seeking the support of all friends of Christian Education Campbell 
College desires to work cooperatively with all other agencies of our Baptist 
State Convention. Campbell College has been founded and fostered to serve 
God and man. Opportunity for service today and tomorrow seems limited 
only by her physical limitations to meet the expanding needs of a new world 
order. » 



Annual of Session 1944 115 

106. 

(b) GARDNER- WEBB COLLEGE 

P. L. Elliott, President 

(Gardner-Webb is not owned and operated by the Convention.) 

The work at Gardner-Webb is very gratifying. We have an increase in 
students of 30%. Many more would have been here if we had had the room 
for them. The freshman class is of a higher order than we usually get. The 
spirit on the campus is as fine as I have ever seen on any campus. 

Our enlargement campaign is progressing nicely. We have now approxi- 
mately $235,000.00 in cash or its equivalent. We shall begin the construction 
of the thirteen new buildings which will constitute our plant as soon after the 
war as is practical. We are not asking for donations primarily. Anyone who 
has money he wishes to invest, we cordially invite him to come see what we 
are doing and what we plan to do ; if this appeals to him as a real investment, 
we shall be glad for him to make it. 

We covet the prayers and good wishes of the Baptist State Convention. 
We should like to be thought of as worthy associates in the field of Christian 
education. We should like to be a vital part of a great Baptist education 
program. We shall not be a suppliant for recognition; we shall try to make 
ourselves worthy of the recognition that we covet; and we shall do it in the 
faith that when we have made ourselves worthy, the Convention will think 
and act toward us as she does toward all her vital children. 

107. 

(c) MARS HILL COLLEGE 

E. F. W r atson, President of Board of Trustees 
Hoyt Blackwell, President 

The eighty-ninth session of Mars Hill College began auspiciously. The 
faculty is consecrated, efficient, and loyal. The enrollment to date is 709 regu- 
lar college students and 20 special students. In this number there are 25 young 
ministers and two children of missionaries. It is gratifying to report that 
696 of the students enrolled are church members. During the week of October 
9 Dr. Ralph Herring, of Winston-Salem led us in our annual fall revival. 
•Dr. Herring's personal consecration, his gospel messages, and the Christian 
atmosphere of the community were the means of leading hundreds to confess 
their sins and reaffirm their faith in Christ. Thirteen made a profession of 
faith in Chirst and were received as candidates for baptism. This ordinance 
was administered on Sunday, October 15, and all of the thirteen are now 
members in full fellowship of the Mars Hill Baptist Church. 

The second term of the summer school as an integral part of the regular 
schedule of the college was gratifying. The faculty were loyal and aggressive 
Christians and the 223 students enrolled were cooperative. For the second 
year in succession the budget was paid in full without drawing upon the col- 
lege treasury. 

For the calendar year 1943, the Convention made an appropriation of $15,000 
to Mars Hill College for current support. Accordingly, the college is even 
more keenly aware of its obligation to the Convention and of its responsibility 
in promoting every interest of the Kingdom of God. 

Mars Hill College has entered the tenth year of its present enlargement 



116 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

and endowment program. Much has been achieved, but the larger and more 
glorious tasks are ahead of us. This is evidenced by the fact that more than 
100 young women and approximately 25 young men were turned away last 
September because of a lack of dormitory rooms. The college looks, there- 
fore, to a multitude of friends for a place in their prayers and for gifts of 
money and other property. 

The Lord has been good to Mars Hill from the date of its founding in 
1856. There have always been friends ready to respond when its needs have 
been made known. 

108. 

(d) MEREDITH COLLEGE 

W. H. Weatherspoon, President Board of Trustees 
Carlyle Campbell, President 

The total enrollment for 1943-44, including 21 new registrations for the 
1943 summer session, was 518. Students were enrolled from four foreign 
countries, sixteen states, and seventy counties in North Carolina. The aca- 
demic classification of the 476 regular college students shows 183 freshmen, 
94 sophomores, 95 juniors, and 104 seniors. Forty-eight students entered, with 
advanced standing, from other colleges. At the beginning of the year 467 
students indicated the following denominational affiliation : 331 Baptists, 67 
Methodists, 22 Presbyterians, 17 members of no church, 10 Christians, 20 
members of other church groups. 

The auditor's report on operations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1944, 
shows an income of $291,668.29, and expenditures amounting to $280,078.88. 
From the State Baptist Convention $22,000 was received for current support. 
All student accounts receivable had been paid in cash before the 'end of the 
year. 

A factual summary or evaluation of the year's activities is impossible in a 
brief report; but, particularly in view of circumstances, College officials are 
of the opinion that it was a year of substantial achievement and development. 
Special mention should be made of Religious Focus Week, held February 
20-25, 1944, during which time we had the full, splendid services of twelve 
outstanding leaders in our Southern Baptist work. From messages, confer- 
ences, and personal association with them the spiritual life of the College was 
greatly stimulated. To the Sunday School Board we express our gratitude 
for this enriching experience, and also for the assurance that a similar pro- 
gram will be held here in 1944-45. 

The year 1944-45 has begun most auspiciously. We have the largest en- 
rollment in the history of Meredith College. By July 17, every dormitory 
room had been reserved, later admissions being possible only as withdrawals 
occurred. This registration for the first semester, as of October 21, shows a 
total of 593 students. They represent three foreign countries, fourteen states, 
and seventy-five counties in North Carolina. Because of resignations, leaves 
of absence, and necessary additions to take care of the increased enrollment, 
a number of new appointments in the staff had to be made ; these new in- 
structors and officers are giving a good account of themselves. 

The confidence and interest of North Carolina Baptists in Meredith Col- 
lege, as indicated by their generous support of our $565,000 Expansion Pro- 



Annual of Session 1944 117 

gram, is most stimulating and prophetic. Present indications suggest that we 
shall greatly exceed the goal set up, and that a period of significant develop- 
ment is ahead. The responsive attitude of Meredith officials is revealed by 
this unanimous expression of the faculty and staff at a recent meeting : "We 
are servants of North Carolina Baptists, who have entrusted to our care the 
Christian nurture of nearly six hundred young women. They constitute our 
supreme opportunity and sacred obligation." 

109. 

(e) WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

John A. Oates, President Board of Trustees 
Thurman D. Kitchin, President 

The session of 1944-1945 marks the return of Wake Forest College to the 
semester system and the presence of a purely civilian student body. 
The following items are of interest to the Convention : 

I. A year ago I had to report that we had the smallest enrollment in 33 
years, only 448 students not counting those registered in the medical school. 

I thought 1944-45 would be an even worse year for student enrollment. 
I was mistaken. Today we have 560 students on our campus ; 10 students in 
the Duke- Wake Forest Law School in Durham, and 191 students in our medi- 
cal school in Winston-Salem, making a total of 761. An encouraging part of 
this is that of this number 313 are freshmen, making the largest freshman class 
in Wake Forest's history. 

However, I must qualify these encouraging statements with the sober re- 
minder that the great majority of these freshmen are 16 or 17 years old, and 
the military situation will not allow them to remain in college long. 

II. Twenty-six members of our faculty and approximately 2800 Wake 
Forest Alumni are in the Armed Forces. 

III. The exterior of our Chapel is now complete and it is hoped that the 
entire building can be finished in another year. 

The Religion and Music Building, completed more than a year ago, was 
given its first civilian use by the Preachers' School last June. It is now in 
full use by the departments of Religion and Music, and is thoroughly adapted 
to the purposes for which it was planned. 

IV. The temporary arrangement to conduct our Law School in connection 
with the Duke University Law School has been satisfactory, but it is hoped 
that our Law School may be brought back to the Wake Forest campus by the 
time the new session opens next September. 

V. Since the last meeting of the Convention, we have awarded the first 
M.D. degree ever given by this College, and within the past 12 months 69 
such degrees have been conferred. 

VI. It is worthy of note that when the members of the first graduating class 
form the Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College took the 
examination before the Board of Medical Examiners of North Carolina three 
of the four top places went to members of this first graduating class. 

VII. A report to this body would be incomplete without mentioning the 
unusually fine spirit on our campus. Although our students are as a group 
younger than in former years, they have a sense of propriety and a seriousness 
of purpose that must be accounted for at least in part by the grave aspect of 
world conditions. 



118 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

110. 

(f) WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

H. K. Helms, Chairman Board of Trostees 
C. C. Burris, President 

Since 1896 the little town of Wingate has been favored in having an insti- 
tution of learning here. Wingate High School was organized in 1896 and 
opened its doors that year. Professor M. B. Dry was the principal during 
those early years. The Baptist institution was run in connection with the state 
schools until 1917. Union County built a public school building at Wingate 
and the Baptist institution was then on its own. In 1923 it was advanced to 
the standing of a junior college and the ownership was turned over to the 
Baptist State Convention. In 1930, the ownership was returned to its former 
owners, Union, Mecklenburg, Cabarrus, and Pee Dee Associations. Three 
other associations have since become affiliated with the work in full owner- 
ship and management. These associations are the Anson and Stanly in North 
Carolina and Chesterfield in South Carolina. The Trustees are appointed by 
these cooperating associations. At a recent meeting of the Montgomery As- 
sociation, a motion was unanimously passed making the Montgomery Associa- 
tion affiliated with the group mentioned above. Rev. C. B. Trammel of Troy, 
was appointed as a Trustee of the College for the next three years. Due to 
the emergency the curriculum has been broadened and enlarged by the intro- 
duction of a larger Physical Education program and the addition of new 
Science courses. Wingate College is now fully accredited by .the State Edu- 
cation Department of North Carolina and the American Association of Col- 
leges. It cooperates fully with the armed forces in the present emergency. 

The administration was indeed fortunate in securing a complete faculty, 
although teachers have entered many other fields of activity. We believe we 
have the best balanced faculty for the incoming year that we have had. Every 
teacher is fully prepared and equipped for teaching in his or her department. 

Late in the fall of 1943, a financial program was launched with three 
objectives : 

First : To pay the indebtedness which has been carried for many years. 
This objective has been reached and the debt was paid in its entirety on July 
IS, 1944. The College is now ready to move on toward the second objective. 

Second : To renovate and modernize the present plant. This is being done 
as the funds come in and it is hoped by the summer of 1945, that the plant 
will be completely modernized. 

Third : To launch a building program consisting of the following buildings : 
A boys' dormitory which will house about one hundred men; a small library 
that will hold about ten thousand volumes with reading rooms and offices, and 
a dining room with a capacity of two hundred students together with a kitchen 
and other equipment. It is also planned to build a Home Economics building 
on the same general location where the dining room is to be placed. These 
are the immediate needs to which the College has set itself. 

The College is especially fortunate in having two splendid churches in 
sight of the campus. The Methodist Church is just across town and is attended 
by many of our students. The local Baptist Church joins our campus. Rev. 
W. C. Link is pastor of the Baptist Church and we consider him one of the 
outstanding pastors of the state. He is loved by both students and faculty. 



Annual of Session 1944 



119 



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Annual of Session 1944 121 

The enrollment for 1944-45 is somewhat larger than it has been for some 
years and we have students not only from North Carolina, but from several 
states, including Cuba. As stated above, the entire indebtedness has been paid 
and the College is living within its income. Due to the increase in contribu- 
tions from the Baptist State Convention and from the churches in the Associa- 
tions which have been supporting the school through the years, we feel that 
Wingate is now at the "dawn of a new day" and we ask for your earnest 
prayers and support. » 

112. 

VIII. BENEVOLENCE 

Under the present arrangement we think of the orphanage, hospital, and 
aged ministers' relief when the work "benevolence" is mentioned. We should 
not think of the Ministers' Retirement Plan as benevolence. However, we in- 
clude a statement here concerning it. because it is closely akin to relief and 
both are administered by the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. 

A. RELIEF AND ANNUITY 
1. Relief 

We are glad to print here for the information of the Convention, and for 
future reference, facts about relief and annuity obtained from the report of the 
Relief and Annuity Board. We call attention to the fact that the Relief and 
Annuity Board has many different funds and plans, and that beneficiaries in 
North Carolina will receive during 1944 about $70,000. 

(a) Relief 

Benefits paid to pastors and widows during the year 1943 amounted to 
11,668.35. 

(b) Retirement Plans 

1. The Baptist Boards' Employees Retirement Plan at present is supply- 
ng an annuity for Miss Bessie Morgan, who is receiving $500 a year. 

2. In the Ministers' Retirement Plan we have thirty receiving annuities— 
ige, disability and widows— the total amount being $8,241.28. 

113. 

2. Orphanage 

Zeno Wall, President of Board of Trustees 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent 

In our enthusiasm to win the war, in our anxiety about our boys who are 
it the front giving their last full measure of devotion we should not overlook 
he things for which we are fighting. We must win the war but in winning 
t let us continue to make men and women who will be worthy and capable 
ft rebuilding a shocked world and carrying on the work of the Kingdom of 
}od. Each day more than six hundred children must depend upon friends 
)f the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina for support. These friends have 
lot failed in the past, and are not going to fail now. 

1943 saw many changes in the Orphanage, both in personnel and the 
ihysical plants. Our rise in income has enabled us to meet the sharp in- 



122 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

crease in operating costs. Our most difficult task has been the maintenance 
of a capable staff, against the competition of other types of work where 
hours are shorter and cash compensations larger. During this year because 
of the increasing number of small children it has been necessary to employ 
more colored help than ever before. 

The Social Service Department is now under the direction of Mrs. Louise 
L. Blake. Miss Hattie Edwards served in this capacity for many years 
and is known and loved by almost every Baptist in North Carolina. Her 
faithful years of service has and will continue to have its imprint upon the 
lives of hundreds of men and \vomen who will remember her as one who 
went about doing good. She plans now to go to her home at Mars Hill 
where she will still find a place of service. We have cared for in the past 
year 698 children in our two homes, twenty-three in boarding homes, and 
sixty through Mother's Aid in their own homes. In addition to this, other 
adjustments have been made where otherwise the homes might have gone to 
pieces. 

Perhaps in one year there has never been as much improvement in the 
physical plants. At both Mills Home and Kennedy Home a continual pro- 
gram of cottage renovation has gone on. Better living conditions add much 
to the morale of any group, and certainly it is readily manifest in a group 
of children living together. 

As a result of good food, regular hours and the cooperation of workers 
and children, the health of our children is far above that of the outside 
population. The physical education program goes on the year around with 
trained workers in charge. Attendance in school during the past year reached 
about ninety-nine per cent. The Mills Home school is conducted on the 
Orphanage campus as a unit of the Thomasville City Schools and the Ken- 
nedy Home children attend the LaGrange school, traveling by county busses. 

Both homes have their own churches with a full time pastor living on 
each campus. A graded Sunday school, BTU and MMU help in rounding 
out the lives of our boys and girls. 

Charity and Children is published each week at Mills Home and covers the 
activities of the Orphanage. A profitable commercial printing shop is also 
maintained and this adds to the training available for the boys. 

On account of the increased cost of living the monthly contributions and 
the Thanksgiving offering should be larger this year than they have ever 
aeen before, if we are to continue in the one great purpose of guiding upset 
boys and girls. 

In the name of Christ whose love for the orphan child was supreme and 
as an opportunity for enriching our own lives let us rededicate ourselves 
to the task of supporting and training those committed to our care. 

114. 

3. Hospital 
J. S. Lynch, President of Board of Trustees 
Smith Hagaman, Superintendent 
General 

The Board of Trustees of your hospital is again happy to make a report 
►hat they believe reflects a great step forward in the work of the Kingdom. 



Annual of Session 1944 123 

The Board does not claim credit for the great work your institution has 
done during this year, but gives that credit to the real cooperation of the 
pastors, of the public, to the churches and their workers, and most of all to 
the Divine Providence in whose Name our work is done and by whose grace 
we are permitted to carry on. The realization of the tremendous need of the 
hospital's service has been a stimulus during this war handicapped year to 
make us utilize the facilities of our institution to the utmost advantage. We 
also owe a debt of gratitude to the employees of the hospital who have loyally 
carried on its work under the worst labor and supplies handicap of the hos- 
pital's history. 

Professional and Educational 

We would like to call attention to the fact that your hospital has the full 
approval and recognition as an A-l hospital by all the standardizing and 
rating agencies of this country. In many of our fields of endeavor we are 
one of a few hospitals so approved. Again we recognize the place the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College has had in rais- 
ing the caliber of our service to such excellence. Those students in the 
various schools conducted by the hospital itself now number over two hun- 
dred. We give thanks that we are able to carry out the two great services 
of Christ, teaching and healing. In the development of the professional ex- 
cellence and in the responsibilities of the teaching program, your Board has 
not lost sight of the duty of this institution to develop as an outstanding 
Christian center. The expressions of our patients assure us that despite the 
hospital's growth it has not outgrown the influence of Christ. 

Charity Service 

The in-patient load reached the hospital's capacity during the past twelve 
months. We are now averaging over ninety-five per cent occupancy at all 
times. This year we will have over 86,000 patients days of service. Of this 
number, between 29,000 and 30,000 days will be free days provided for pa- 
tients unable to pay anything toward their hospital stay. In addition, there 
will be over 10,000 part-pay days of care given to those unable to pay the 
full charges of the hospital. The free and part-pay groups also will not 
pay a physician's or surgeon's fee. This is another sharp increase in the 
total of charity work done as we were able to do only slightly over 26,000 
free days of care during 1943. The generous answer to our Mother's Day 
appeal has been the controlling factor in this increase of charity work. The 
Board again gives its pledge that every penny contributed for the purpose 
of charity work will be spent only for the purpose for which it was given. 
In this connection, it is pertinent to point out that the free work done for 
the pastors and missionaries is not done with Mother's Day money and is 
not considered charity. The cost of this work this year will amount to 
slightly over $10,000.00 and this cost will be borne from income of the hos- 
pital other than the Mother's Day contributions. .We are proud that we 
can carry a program whereby complete hospitalization is given to every 
minister, regardless of denomination, that is admitted to the hospital in a 
ward bed. Those ministers, missionaries, and ministerial students who de- 



124 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

sire a private room are charged only the differential between the ward and 
private room accommodations. Families of this group are given a flat fifty 
per cent on their total charges. 

As we stated above, the great program of charity service carried on by 
the Baptist Hospital is made possible by the generous support given the 
hospital on Mother's Day. This year's contributions to the Mother's Day 
program will total about $93,000.00. This is a large increase over the dona- 
tions of any previous year. Last year the hospital received $72,584.08. At 
the State Convention in November of last year it was decided that all dona- 
tions above $75,000.00 would be used by the convention toward the retire- 
ment of the debt of the convention made in the interest of the last building 
program of the hospital. To date $92,409.65 has been received, of which 
$17,409.65 has been forwarded to Raleigh for debt retirement purposes. The 
total free work this year will cost the hospital over $200,000.00. $75,000.00 of 
this will come from Mother's Day, and the remaining $125,000.00 will come 
from the Duke Endowment and other charitable agencies. It is realized that 
we are now in a period of abnormal prosperity, and that the contributions 
of outside individuals and agencies will not be maintained when economic 
conditions are not so prosperous. However, it is our hope that the hospital 
will be able to always add an additional dollar to every Mother's Day dollar 
received so that our great charity program will not have to be curtailed. 

Out-Patient Department 

We are happy to announce that the field of usefulness of the hospital 
will be more than doubled in the near future through the construction of a 
very large Out-Patient Building for the diagnostic examination of around 
40,000 patients a year. This addition to our hospital plant has been made 
possible through a donation of a wealthy New York lady and through a 
grant of $20,000.00 made to this project by the Duke Endowment. The single 
greatest need in medical care today is such a diagnostic center that will 
give the local doctors over the State a place of higher resort to which the 
difficult cases can go for diagnosis. These local hospitals and doctors over 
the State for economic reasons cannot have the vast investment in laboratory, 
X-Ray, and other diagnostic equipment, nor the highly trained and highly 
paid technicians required in the use of it. In the Out-Patient Department 
here at the Baptist Hospital nationally known specialists have use of this 
costly equipment and personnel in their exhaustible efforts in behalf of every 
person sent to the Out-Patient Department for diagnosis. 

This greatly enlarged Out-Patient Department will be one of the largest 
in the nation dedicated to those unable to pay a doctor's fee. It is going to 
cost a considerable sum to operate, in fact, it is anticipated that its annual 
cost will exceed its income by $25,000.00. The only charges are a $1.00 regis- 
tration fee and $.50 return visit fee plus reduced charges for X-Ray work. 
No charge is made for the doctors and in many instances the cost to the 
hospital for the laboratory work alone required on a particular patient is 
many times in excess of the nominal fee collected. After its completion, no 
sick person then need ever suffer because it cannot be determined what is caus- 
ing the sickness. A full report will be furnished the family doctor of each 



Annual of Session 1944 125 

out-patient showing what diagnosis was made and what treatments are sug- 
gested. If space is not available to admit the patient into the Baptist Hos- 
pital, this report will enable patients to receive treatment from their local 
doctors when they return home. 

Financial 

In our report last year we were able to state that the hospital had wiped 
out its current indebtedness and was operating within its budget. Despite 
our increase in charity work we are able to repeat that same statement this 
year. It is hoped that such a report can be given again next year although 
we must admit that some anxiety is felt due to the rather large increase in 
prices of supplies and labor. The hospital has been forced to bid against 
local defense industries for non-professional personnel, and this has in turn 
enforced an upward revision of the wage scale until the wage rate is now 
approximately one hundred per cent more in each non-professional job than 
it was three years ago. A similar picture, though not quite as dark, is evi- 
denced in the purchase of supplies. Your hospital has felt this much more 
than the other hospitals of North Carolina since the charity load of the 
Baptist Hospital has increased approximately one hundred per cent during 
the same period while the charity load of the other hospitals in the State 
has decreased. The Duke Endowment recently announced that the charity 
work in other hospitals of the State was approximately only forty per cent 
of what it was four years ago. The dual increase of cost and of charity 
work done has made the hospital officials doubly conscious of expenditures 
in each department of the hospital. 

In our capital fund the hospital has a $60,000.00 obligation still remaining 
from its 1940 expansion program. In addition, we have the new nurses' 
home under construction, and it is expected that the hospital will owe be- 
tween $70,000.00 and $80,000.00 more when this unit is completed. This 
building and its equipment is financed by authority of the convention to 
borrow up to $110,000.00. Arrangements to borrow this money were perfected 
with the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company as directed by resolution of 
the trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital. Funds received from 
the government through the nurses' training program are being applied 
against this construction cost. Approximately ninety-seven per cent of the 
students enrolled in the School of Nursing have voluntarily joined the Nurs- 
ing Cadet Corps. It is hoped that the hospital will be able to bring the 
indebtedness on the nurses' home down to about $70,000.00. Many of our 
newly graduated nurses are now in Army hospitals in the United States and 
abroad. A recent communication from one of these girls serving in the 
South Pacific emphasizes that a victory for Christ may be won as well as a 
victory over the enemy. The tragic need, both medically and spiritually, has 
so impressed her that she would like to return to the same field when the 
war is over. It is our firm belief that all of our girls are utilizing their 
Christian training as well as their professional training in their work of 
mercy at the battle front. 



126 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Expansion Program 

During the past twelve months much study has been given to the plans 
for expansion of the hospital. Realizing that the expansion could not be 
accomplished in one stroke, it was decided to develop an overall plan that 
could be developed by steps taken as resources were made available. A firm 
of architects, specializing in hospital architecture, was employed to facilitate 
this study. The results of the study showed that a minimum of six hundred 
beds was needed if even a justifiable portion of the hospital's requirements 
for bed space were to be met. Our records show that no less than seven 
hundred pastors have communicated with the hospital by letter, by visit, or 
by telephone in the interest of getting patients to the hospital. We are now 
running behind to the extent of almost two months in the admission of pay 
patients, and almost one month in the admission of free patients to the hos- 
pital. Of course, the Board of Trustees realizes that it cannot be expected 
to take care of all the demands for bed space that are made upon it. This 
demand is ever increasing as the hospital becomes more universally known 
because of the outstanding and unusual services rendered by reason of its 
vast facilities. Neither does the hospital have any desire to expand beyond 
the ability of its resources for financing the current cost. On the other hand, 
as a medical center it does have the responsibility to utilize to the fullest 
extent the talents of the trained specialists available here for the care of 
patients suffering from those conditions which the local hospitals over the 
State cannot serve. The increased program of hospital building throughout 
the State will more and more come to take care of the routine hospital cases, 
but these local hospitals will never be able to render a service to the difficult 
cases requiring specialized study, surgery and treatment. Through the co- 
operation of the medical school, we have an accumulation of specialists under 
one roof that only a teaching center can attract. We know that the demand 
will be far in excess of six hundred beds, but we are setting that as our 
goal with the knowledge that many times that number of beds are needed 
for the difficult type of work which is performed here. 

We have taken our first expansion step in securing the funds and prior- 
ities for the construction of the large Out-Patient Building. Our next step, 
and one that must be taken immediately, is the erection of the large south 
wing which will add 140 beds and provide the kitchens, laundry and storage 
space for the final wing which will give us the six hundred beds. The estimated 
cost of the south wing is $800,000.00. If this is made possible, a sizable 
portion will have to come from the Baptists of North Carolina who own 
and control the hospital. We anticipate sizable help from friends of the 
hospital in Winston-Salem and vicinity and from the Duke Endowment, but 
North Carolina Baptists must take the lead in the culmination of this greatly 
needed expansion. Our hope is that the urgent need for additional space 
will be recognized by the many pastors who have occasion to visit the hos- 
pital and who have seen the difficulty under which we are placed in trying 
to provide beds for the real emergency cases. We know that once this need 
is impressed, that the will of our great denomination will be to provide in- 
creased space so that we may render increased service. 



Annual of Session 1944 127 

Recommendations 

The expansion program outlined above is necessary if the hospital is to 
meet even a part of its responsibilities. The new south wing will call for 
an outlay of $800,000.00 plus the annual interest charge on the portion that 
is borrowed. We believe that some portion of this will be forthcoming from 
the friends of the hospital who have thus far been so generous toward us 
in our construction programs. However, we remain dependent upon the con- 
vention from which our help must come. 

It is recommended that the convention maintain its desire to stay out of 
debt. Instead of the convention undergoing further debt, it is recommended 
that the Baptist Hospital, as a going concern, be allowed to borrow up to 
$600,000.00 in order to complete its program for the south wing. In order 
that the hospital may retire this indebtedness and the interest over a ten- 
year period, it is recommended that the hospital be assured of 8 per cent 
of the Cooperative Program receipts for this ten-year period, and that it 
become the duty of the hospital to secure from private sources the additional 
expense of this bond issue in excess of the 8 per cent receipts from the Co- 
operative Program, and that the hospital have the further duty of raising 
from private sources the remaining $200,000.00 of the south wing cost and 
the $130,000.00 for the present indebtedness. 

Your Board of Trustees, hospital personnel, nurses and medical staff 
again reaffirm their obligation of Christian service to the sick and afflicted. 
We continue to give powerful thanks to the support of our brothers in the 
denomination through whose diligent support we are allowed to serve those 
suffering thousands who lay their troubles at your hospital's door. 

115. 

IX. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

We need to be reminded of the following facts : 

The total income of the Convention this year for rhissions, education and 
benevolence will be approximately $1,600,000. Of this amount $300,000 will 
be for the Orphanage, which is not included in the Cooperative Program. 
Of the remaining $1,300,000 about $725,000 will be for the Undesignated Co- 
operative Program. In other words, apart from the Orphanage, designations 
will amount to almost as much as the undesignated funds. However, we 
wish to emphasize the point that in 1945 the Hundred Thousand Club will 
not be needed, and the same may be said of funds for the Wake Forest 
chapel. From these two appeals during 1944 we shall receive nearly 
$100,000. Now our task is to transfer this $100,000 to the Undesignated Co- 
operative Program during 1945. If this can be done then we should receive 
for the Undesignated Cooperative Program $825,000 without the churches 
really giving any more than they are now giving. But if we can step up 
the Undesignated Cooperative Program by 25 per cent— and that is about 
the percentage of increase in 1944 over 1943 — the receipts in 1945 should be 
well beyond the one million mark. That must be our goal, not a penny less. 

In 1944 we are dividing the undesignated receipts on the basis or 60 per 
cent for State Objects and 40 per cent for Southwide Objects. Now that 
our debts are well-nigh paid a change in this division is possible. One of the 



128 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

important matters before this Convention is a wise decision concerning this 
division of funds. A recommendation concerning this matter is made at the 
close of this report. 

We call attention again to the fact that in addition to the Cooperative 
Program there are regular days which should be observed by all the churches 
because of their great educational value. Moreover, until such time as all 
the churches get on a sound budget basis and give a large share of their 
total receipts for Convention objects — perhaps divide their receipts on a 
fifty-fifty vasis — these special days should be used as a means of calling on 
the people to make special offerings. Let us remember that these special 
days are : 

Home and Foreign Mission Day — Some Sunday in March. 

Hospital — Mother's Day in May. 

State Missions — Fourth Sunday in October. 

Orphanage — Thanksgiving Day. 

116. 

X. REPORT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

By G. W. Paschal 

The past year has been one of normal progress. 

In January, 1944, Volumes II and III of the History of Wake Forest 
College, by G. W. Paschal, came from the press. Volume I was published 
in 1935, and the history of the College is now complete from the beginning 
in 1834 to 1943. The three volumes, in their more than 1,750 pages, con- 
stitute not only a definitive history of the College, but contain much of 
general interest on matters relating to the religious and educational devel- 
opment in our state and denomination in the past century. All three vol- 
umes may be ordered' from Mr. E. B. Earnshaw, Bursar, Wake Forest, 
North Carolina. The price for the three is five dollars. 

Constant additions are being made to the Baptist Collection in the Wake 
Forest College Library. Books and pamphlets and periodicals needed to 
fill in gaps are sought for and purchased with a special fund provided by 
the Trustees of the College. Through the cooperation of Secretary Hug- 
gins and Editor Carpenter of the Biblical Recorder, current numbers of our 
more important Baptist papers are regularly received and filed for binding. 
During the past year several church record books, some more than a cen- 
tury old, have been entrusted to the Library for safe keeping. Considerable 
progress has been made in building up complete files of the annuals of the 
Baptist Conventions of the Southern States. Donations have been made by 
more than seventy persons, among them ten volumes of the Christian Index 
given shortly before his death by Dr. B. D. Ragsdale, of Mercer University. 

The resources of the Baptist Collection are in constant requisition by 
students of our Baptist history. Graduate students of other institutions 
sometimes work for weeks in the Library, finding here materials not avail- 
able elsewhere for their theses. At present Dr. L. M. Freeman of Meredith 
College is using the files of minutes of the Raleigh Association in the 
preparation of a much-needed history of that association. 



Annual of Session 1944 129 

117. 

XI. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC. 

T. S. Johnson, Secretary 

On September 25, 1944, the North Carolina Baptist Foundation, Inc., was 
administering trust funds in the total amount of $192,270.98, which includes 
$3,702.59 of cash income received and not yet paid out to beneficiaries as of 
the date of the report of the fiscal agent. 

This represents an increase in assets during the year of $26,149.59. 

The assets of the Foundation and the change made in each classification 
during the past year are as follows : 

Real Estate $ 22,178.02 ? 1,101.00 Decrease 

Building and Loan Stock 11,500.00 700.00 Increase 

Preferred Stock 18,305.00 1,716.50 Increase 

Miscellaneous Bonds 84,457.48 34,870.25 Increase 

Notes Secured by Deed of Trust (4%) ... . 12,122.24 44.44 Increase 

Do (4M%) • • None 1 ,000.00 Decrease 

Do (4ji%).. 12,297.24 750.84 Increase 

Do (5%) 8,003.25 2,001 .93 Decrease 

Do (6%) 7,500.00 2,700.00 Decrease 

Common Stock 9,791.04 2,922.50 Decrease 

Cash Principal Balances 2,414.12 2,689.26 Decrease 

Cash Income Balances 3,702.59 464.25 Increase. 



Totals $192,270.98 $26,131.59 Increase 

The total gross income from these funds amounted to $6,009.49 during the 
fiscal year. Of this amount $5,004.50 was paid out to beneficiaries and the 
cash income balance (not yet paid) to beneficiaries was increased during the 
year by $464.25. 

The following expenses were paid : 

Taxes on real estate $ 91.66 

Repairs on property 41.09 

Insurance premiums 23.30 

General expense 88.96 

Commission of fiscal agent 295.73 



$540.74 

The trust funds of the Foundation are arranged in groups according to 
the purpose for which the trusts were established : 

No. Fund Donors Total Assets 

8900 General T. B. Parker $ 4,372.34 

8901 Aged Ministers' Relief Noah Biggs 57,952.43 

Nannie L. McLean 
W. D. Adams 
P. D. Camp 
W. O. Johnson 

8902 Mills Home W. L. Carter 33,408.31 

Ida Y. Rogers 
O. L. Pittman 
Henrietta S. Jarman 

8903 Roanoke Association Noah Biggs 4,500.00 

8904 Church Buildings Roanoke Association. Noah Biggs 5,000.00 



130 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



No. 
8505 
8906 
8S07 



8 f 09 
8910 
8911 
8912 
8913 
8914 
8915 

8916 

8917 



Fund 



Donor 



Ministerial Association Noah Biggs 

Baptist Hospital W. L. Carter 

State Missions D. P. Bridges 

Y. M. Whisenunt 
Margaret McDade 
H. C. Bridger 
B. F. Huntley 

Meredith College Student Loan Fund. .Henrietta S. Jarman. 

Mills Home and Missions G. H. Church 



Total Assets 

2,214.66 

1,700.00 

40,026.43 



O. L. Pittman 

P. D. Camp 

D.'P. Dellinger 

D. P. Bridges (Cash) 



Gethsemane Baptist Church 

Christian Education 

Boiling Springs Educational Fund 

General 

State Missions O. L. Pittman 

W. M. U. Scholarship 

In Memory of Mrs. Edna R. Harris 

Clement Bapt : st Church John E. Briggs 

Medical Department Dr. Wayland Mitchell . 

Wake Forest College 
Cash Balances 



4,933.50 
8,125.78 
2,424.19 
7,410.06 
735.88 
439.45 
2,497.50 
5,653.19 

3,700.00 
1,500.00 

6,116.71 



Totals $192,270.98 

The following table will show for the past five years the comparative 
income on the total fund and on the assets after deducting unproductive real 
estate : 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Company 

Fiscal Agent 
North Carolina Baptist Foundation 

Statement showing income for period September 5, 1939 to September 25, 

1944. 













Gross 


Income 












Annual 


Paid to 








Incomt 




** Yield 


Beneficiaries 


* 


Assets 




Collected 


% 


or Invested 


$146,040.69 $7,040. 


14 


4.8% 


$6,200.00 


148, 


,398. 


90 


6,526. 


53 


4.4% 


5,340.00 


155 


,466. 


.77 


6,023. 


18 


3.9% 


4,620.00 


162 


,883. 


.05 


6,033. 


.50 


3.7% 


5,210.33 


188 


,568, 


.39 


5,913. 


99 


3.1% 


5,004.50 



Do 9-25-41 

Do 9-25-42 

Do 9-25-43 

Do 9-25-44 

Annual Average for Period . . $160,271.56 $6,307.47 3.9% $5,274.97 (3.3%) 

Yield on Assets after deducting Unproductive Real Estate 

Per Annua' Report of 9-25-40 $133,340.69 5.3% 

Do 9-25-41 135,698.90 4.8% 



Do 9-25-42 

Do 9-25-43 

Do 9-25-44 



143,666.77 4.2% 

151,083.05 4% 

176,768.39 3.3% 



Annual Average for Period . . $148,111.56 4.3% 



(3.6%) 



*Assets as shown include Real Estate, Securities, Notes and Uninvested Principal Cash, but do not 
include Income Cash Balances. 

**Yield based on Assets held in Accounts as of Annual Accounting dates. 



Annual of Session 1944 131 

The Secretary repeats the recommendation made in every annual report 
since 1940, details of which recommendation may be found in our previous 
reports. The Foundation offers an easy, sound and economical way to raise 
money and to provide for its safe investment and management. Every year 
that the Baptists of North Carolina allow the Foundation to go forward with 
only nominal support is a year longer under a less efficient system of 
investment. 

118. 

XII. THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

(Owned jointly by the Baptist Sunday School Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention and the General Board of the Baptist State Convention 
of North Carolina.) 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Manager 

The purpose of the Baptist Book Store is to serve North Carolina Bap- 
tists with the best in books and supplies needed for every department of 
the church, and to encourage the reading of more and better books in the 
homes of our denomination. All books, Bibles, and supplies are sold strictly 
at publishers' prices, at a fair percentage of profit, which is divided equally 
between the Baptist Sunday School Board and the North Carolina Mission 
Board and is used for general mission purposes. Since ours is the only de- 
nominational book store in the State, a great many books and supplies are sold 
to people and churches of other denominations. 

Net sales for the year ending December 31, 1943, amounted to $134,202.22, 
an increase of $36,449.04, or 37 per cent over 1942. This is an interesting 
comparison with the sales ten years ago, 1933, which amounted to only 
$22,647.28. The sales turned over the inventory five times. 

Write for free catalogues. 

119. 

XIII. RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. That the division of Undesignated Cooperative Program funds as be- 
tween State Objects and Southern Baptist Convention Objects be on a 55-45 
basis, and that the funds so designated for State Objects be divided as follows: 

Christian Education (to include not more than 1^4% 
for Ministerial Education and for the education 

of the pastors now serving our churches) 34 

State Missions 11 

Hospital 8 

Ministers' Retirement Fund 2% 

Total 55 

2. That the Convention authorize a continuance of the work with our 
Negro and Indian brethren, and that the appropriations be made as generous 
as the income of the Convention will permit. 

3. That the work at Oteen, Samarcand and at the sanatoriums — Aberdeen 
and Black Mountain — be continued ; and that with reference to Oteen the 



132 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

other states that have soldier-patients there be requested to continue the 
support they have been giving, due to the fact that the recognized Protestant 
chaplain now serving the hospital is a Baptist. 

4. That the Board be authorized to continue to work on the plan which 
will place in the field the best available man, whose duty it will be to solicit 
large contributions in the form of gifts, wills, living trusts, and insurance 
policies, for our several institutions and agencies; and that all tht institu- 
tions and agencies of the Convention be asked to cooperate, in so far as it 
is possible, with respect (1) to providing the salary and expenses, (kj to 
selecting the man, and (3) to furnishing him with full information as to 
needs and prospects. Further, that the Board be authorized to consider 
combining the work outlined above with Laymen's Work, since conceivably 
one man might be able to carry on in an effective way both activities. 

5. That the Convention give assurance to officials and agencies of the 
Southern Baptist Convention of the complete cooperation of officials and 
agencies of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina in the Centen- 
nial Crusade; that North Carolina will undertake to raise an over-all total 
of $2,000,000 as its share of the over-all goal of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention for the uses of the agencies of both conventions ; that full support 
will be given to the effort to reach and win at least one million people in the 
Southland to Christ during the next year, and likewise to enlist those in the 
churches not now enlisted ; that to this end the Convention call on all the 
churches to add to their Cooperative Program goals for 1945 the amount 
received in 1944 for the Hundred Thousand Club, estimated at $60,000; and 
that in addition to that each church undertakes to raise its Cooperative 
Program objective by 33Vs%. 

6. That the General Secretary be authorized and instructed to make an 
appeal to individuals and churches during the remaining weeks of 1944 for 
funds for the Wake Forest chapel, in order that the money now owed on 
the chapel may be paid, if possible ; and that whatever amount may be due 
at the end of the year, together with the amount that will be needed to com- 
plete the chapel, be a first charge against the Cooperative Program funds 
accruing to Education in 1945, and set aside for building purposes. 

7. That the Convention adopt the recommendations of the Education 
Council printed herein with respect to the amount allocated for current support 
as shown by the report of the Education Council appearing on page 76 of the 
Advance Report. 

8. That the Board be authorized and empowered to set aside an amount 
not to exceed $7,500 for the use of the Allied Church League for the Abolition 
of Beverage Alcohol ; and that the Convention nominate 55 persons to be 
elected by the Board of Trustees as the Convention's representatives on the 
board of the League; and that on some Sunday in January, preferably the 
last Sunday in the month, every pastor in the State be requested to give his 
people a message on temperance, and inform them of what is going on 
among the Christian people of the State to rid North Carolina of beverage 
alcohol. 

9. That the Convention authorize the General Board to set aside out of 
State Mission fund an amount not to exceed $7,500 for the purpose of aid- 
ing the church at H'ayesville in their effort to build a church building which 
would be a worthy memorial to Dr. George W. Truett; and that the Gen- 



Annual of Session 1944 133 

eral Secretary be authorized to urge the churches of the State to provide an 
equal amount, it being understood that the members of the Hayesville Church 
will provide a like amount. 

10. That the General Board be authorized to appoint a committee of five to 
investigate the possibility of using the Fruitland Institute property, it being 
understood that this committee will report its findings to the General Board, 
and it being further understood that the General Board shall have authority